Hand-turnedQuilt BindingBinding for Show
The tools you will need: rotary cutter, snips, fabric markers, a pin with alarge head, sewing needle, a sewing gauge to ac...
Use the largest square ruler you can manage!I love a 16” square ruler, but it’s too big for my hand. The 12-1/2” ruler is ...
This is a much better corner.                           www.cambridgelane.com   4
To make binding:Press binding fabric well, even up on one side. Cut as accurately as possibleinto strips. I almost always ...
Here, I will cut the binding 2 inches wide.                           www.cambridgelane.com   6
Trim selvedges from binding strips.Selvedges don’t act like the rest of the fabric. Get rid of them!                      ...
Stitch binding strips togetherLay one binding strip horizontally to you right side up and cover the cornerwith the second ...
Stitch strips togetherAfter stitching the first two strips together along the marked line, lay the free end ofthe previous...
All sewn together!Time to snip them apart and trim the seams!                         www.cambridgelane.com   10
Trim off the edges of each join ¼” away from seam.                         www.cambridgelane.com       11
Press the binding seam open.                 www.cambridgelane.com   12
Press binding.Press the binding in half, wrong sides together. Here the diagonal seamis almost invisible. Press as accurat...
Roll binding.The larger your quilt, the happier you will be that you didn’t skip thisstep! This keeps your binding tidy an...
Hide the binding if you can …I keep my binding roll under the extension table of my machine. It will feeditself onto the q...
Begin sewing binding to quilt topWith a thread in your bobbin to contrast with your quilt back, find a pointsomewhere in t...
MATH NOTES• It’s important to fill your binding.• As an example, for a 2” binding folded in  half, stitch ¼” away from the...
Mark stopping point on cornerI will mark my corner ¼” from the edge, the same as my seam allowance.Put in a long pin with ...
Sew the binding to the quilt topI will sew this in a 1/4” seam until I reach the pin. I do backtack a littleboth at the be...
Almost there! I will stop on the pin and then sew several stitches back tolock the stitch, as I will be pulling just a lit...
First seam is sewn. Time to check the back.                          www.cambridgelane.com   21
Whoops! I wrinkled up my backing when I put in the marking pin. So Iwill need the seam ripper, as I want this to be as per...
Not quite there!Here I stopped about one stitch short of the ¼” mark. I’ll go back and putin one more stitch, backtacking ...
I like this corner much better. Time to turn the corner and make themiter!                          www.cambridgelane.com ...
First fold.Fold the binding back away from the quilt, making a diagonal fold alongthe binding itself. It should be on a st...
Second fold for a mitered cornerThen fold the binding back on top of itself and straight along the next side ofthe quilt. ...
Stop sewing before you reach the end!Continue around the quilt making all four corners nice and square. Uponreaching the l...
Mark the beginning of the bindingPut a pin right where the binding begins.                          www.cambridgelane.com ...
Lay the end of the binding over the beginning and measure from the pinmarking the beginning of the binding a distance EXAC...
Mark end of bindingPull the fabric firmly. Mark the end of the measure.                          www.cambridgelane.com    ...
Here is my marked end of the binding.                         www.cambridgelane.com   31
You can see the overlap of the end of the binding over the beginning.                          www.cambridgelane.com      ...
And here is the trimmed end of the binding laid over the beginning.                          www.cambridgelane.com        ...
Time to finish the ends!Open up the top binding and lay it right side up horizontally. Don’t twistit, just open it up.    ...
Open up the bottom binding and place it, right side down, on top of theother end, matching the ends to make a square. Put ...
Mark the seam line from the top left of the square to the bottom right ofthe square. Stitch but don’t trim the seam yet!  ...
Check it first!Before I trim it I’m going to check and be sure it’s just the right length. Itwill be a lot easier to adjus...
Trim the final binding seamTrim the final seam to about ¼” width.                          www.cambridgelane.com   38
Finger press the seam open.                         www.cambridgelane.com   39
Stitch the remainder of the seam. Don’t worry if you get a little tuck, it’sprobably just on the top and won’t show once y...
Ready to start turning the bindingHere’s what the back of my quilt now looks like with the bindingmachine-stitched on all ...
Choose your thread and needles!Always use a thread to match your binding so it doesn’t show. Here I amusing a 50-weight co...
Make a knotI thread my needle and make a rather substantial knot, one that will holdup to a gentle tug.                   ...
Put the needle through just anywhere, and pull the knot up snug to theinside of the binding seam. Keep the needle just und...
Take the first stitch through the binding, just 2-3 threads in.                           www.cambridgelane.com           ...
Gently roll the binding over to the backing side and pull the thread gentlyto secure. The thread should completely disappe...
Take next stitch into the backing, just a thread under the seam line (inside thequilt, not the seam), and through the quil...
Begin the corner.Upon reaching the corner, take one stitch diagonally at the corner andone stitch into the binding. Pull t...
See that little corner right at the end of the seam line?                           www.cambridgelane.com            49
Stitch the binding corner.Take an extra stitch through the back of the quilt and then through thecorner of the binding. Pu...
Stitch the corner closedIf you think it important to stitch the binding corners closed (and somejudges do notice this), no...
I’ve stitched the back corner closed and now going to finish the front ofit.                          www.cambridgelane.co...
Here’s the front corner stitched closed.                           www.cambridgelane.com   53
Back to the back of the quilt!After closing the front seam of the binding, I’ll just come right backthrough to the corner ...
The back of the quiltHere’s the back of that corner.                           www.cambridgelane.com   55
The finished cornerHere’s the front of the quilt! The corner is square, the binding is filledout, the stitches are invisib...
To add a hanging sleeve to your quilt, a great video is onthe American Quilt Society YouTube channel. It covers theofficia...
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Hand turned quilt binding

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An easy finish for your beautiful quilt - and guaranteed to please the quilt judges!

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Hand turned quilt binding

  1. 1. Hand-turnedQuilt BindingBinding for Show
  2. 2. The tools you will need: rotary cutter, snips, fabric markers, a pin with alarge head, sewing needle, a sewing gauge to accurately mark the quiltand the fabric, and a seam ripper (maybe not!). You will also need yoursewing machine and thread to both match your binding and contrastwith your quilt backing. www.cambridgelane.com 2
  3. 3. Use the largest square ruler you can manage!I love a 16” square ruler, but it’s too big for my hand. The 12-1/2” ruler is bestfor me. Be sure to square up those corners – it’s impossible to put a perfectmiter on a not-square corner. This corner was cut initially with a straight rulerand rotary cutter. www.cambridgelane.com 3
  4. 4. This is a much better corner. www.cambridgelane.com 4
  5. 5. To make binding:Press binding fabric well, even up on one side. Cut as accurately as possibleinto strips. I almost always make mine 2” wide as this makes for easier math.Many people prefer to cut a little bit wider binding, 2-1/2” or so. This is finetoo. I’ll cut this one on the straight-of-grain but bias binding is treatedsimilarly. www.cambridgelane.com 5
  6. 6. Here, I will cut the binding 2 inches wide. www.cambridgelane.com 6
  7. 7. Trim selvedges from binding strips.Selvedges don’t act like the rest of the fabric. Get rid of them! www.cambridgelane.com 7
  8. 8. Stitch binding strips togetherLay one binding strip horizontally to you right side up and cover the cornerwith the second strip placed vertically on top, right side down. Pin and markthe diagonal across the square from the top left-hand corner to the bottomright-hand corner. www.cambridgelane.com 8
  9. 9. Stitch strips togetherAfter stitching the first two strips together along the marked line, lay the free end ofthe previously sewn strip (the one on top of the first, now stitched together)horizontally right side toward you. Place another strip down vertically, mark asbefore from upper left corner to bottom right one, and stitch these two together.Repeat until all strips are sewn in one continuous strip. www.cambridgelane.com 9
  10. 10. All sewn together!Time to snip them apart and trim the seams! www.cambridgelane.com 10
  11. 11. Trim off the edges of each join ¼” away from seam. www.cambridgelane.com 11
  12. 12. Press the binding seam open. www.cambridgelane.com 12
  13. 13. Press binding.Press the binding in half, wrong sides together. Here the diagonal seamis almost invisible. Press as accurately as you can and don’t stretch thebinding. www.cambridgelane.com 13
  14. 14. Roll binding.The larger your quilt, the happier you will be that you didn’t skip thisstep! This keeps your binding tidy and clean and easy to manage. www.cambridgelane.com 14
  15. 15. Hide the binding if you can …I keep my binding roll under the extension table of my machine. It will feeditself onto the quilt without rolling or twisting. Some people wrap theirbinding around a toilet paper tube or a paper towel tube and place it on theircone thread feeder. Do whatever works for you! www.cambridgelane.com 15
  16. 16. Begin sewing binding to quilt topWith a thread in your bobbin to contrast with your quilt back, find a pointsomewhere in the middle of one side of the quilt and mark a spot to beginsewing approximately 6 inches away from the end of the binding. I will beginto sew where my thumb is in this picture. www.cambridgelane.com 16
  17. 17. MATH NOTES• It’s important to fill your binding.• As an example, for a 2” binding folded in half, stitch ¼” away from the edge. For a 2- 1/2” binding folded in half, stitch 3/8” away from the edge.• For a perfect mitered corner, end sewing on each side EXACTLY the WIDTH OF YOUR SEAM away from the corner edge. Mark this distance with a pin that you will definitely see. www.cambridgelane.com 17
  18. 18. Mark stopping point on cornerI will mark my corner ¼” from the edge, the same as my seam allowance.Put in a long pin with a head that’s really easy to see. www.cambridgelane.com 18
  19. 19. Sew the binding to the quilt topI will sew this in a 1/4” seam until I reach the pin. I do backtack a littleboth at the beginning and end of each seam. www.cambridgelane.com 19
  20. 20. Almost there! I will stop on the pin and then sew several stitches back tolock the stitch, as I will be pulling just a little on the binding to make mycorners. www.cambridgelane.com 20
  21. 21. First seam is sewn. Time to check the back. www.cambridgelane.com 21
  22. 22. Whoops! I wrinkled up my backing when I put in the marking pin. So Iwill need the seam ripper, as I want this to be as perfect as possible.Leaving in the pin, I will try again. www.cambridgelane.com 22
  23. 23. Not quite there!Here I stopped about one stitch short of the ¼” mark. I’ll go back and putin one more stitch, backtacking at the end. The extra thread won’t show. www.cambridgelane.com 23
  24. 24. I like this corner much better. Time to turn the corner and make themiter! www.cambridgelane.com 24
  25. 25. First fold.Fold the binding back away from the quilt, making a diagonal fold alongthe binding itself. It should be on a straight line with the edge of thequilt. Finger press the fold. www.cambridgelane.com 25
  26. 26. Second fold for a mitered cornerThen fold the binding back on top of itself and straight along the next side ofthe quilt. Don’t let the fold hang over the top of the quilt or it will make thecorner too full and difficult to turn the binding to the back. Begin to stitchright at the edge of the binding, backtacking to secure stitches. www.cambridgelane.com 26
  27. 27. Stop sewing before you reach the end!Continue around the quilt making all four corners nice and square. Uponreaching the last corner I will sew until I am about 6” again from the loose endof the beginning of the binding. (The distance from the index finger to thethumb will vary on everyone, but for me it’s about 6 inches.) www.cambridgelane.com 27
  28. 28. Mark the beginning of the bindingPut a pin right where the binding begins. www.cambridgelane.com 28
  29. 29. Lay the end of the binding over the beginning and measure from the pinmarking the beginning of the binding a distance EXACTLY THAT OF THEWIDTH OF YOUR BINDING. Here, my binding was 2” wide, so I’mmeasuring 2” past the beginning of the binding. www.cambridgelane.com 29
  30. 30. Mark end of bindingPull the fabric firmly. Mark the end of the measure. www.cambridgelane.com 30
  31. 31. Here is my marked end of the binding. www.cambridgelane.com 31
  32. 32. You can see the overlap of the end of the binding over the beginning. www.cambridgelane.com 32
  33. 33. And here is the trimmed end of the binding laid over the beginning. www.cambridgelane.com 33
  34. 34. Time to finish the ends!Open up the top binding and lay it right side up horizontally. Don’t twistit, just open it up. www.cambridgelane.com 34
  35. 35. Open up the bottom binding and place it, right side down, on top of theother end, matching the ends to make a square. Put a pin in it. www.cambridgelane.com 35
  36. 36. Mark the seam line from the top left of the square to the bottom right ofthe square. Stitch but don’t trim the seam yet! www.cambridgelane.com 36
  37. 37. Check it first!Before I trim it I’m going to check and be sure it’s just the right length. Itwill be a lot easier to adjust if I have the extra still on it. www.cambridgelane.com 37
  38. 38. Trim the final binding seamTrim the final seam to about ¼” width. www.cambridgelane.com 38
  39. 39. Finger press the seam open. www.cambridgelane.com 39
  40. 40. Stitch the remainder of the seam. Don’t worry if you get a little tuck, it’sprobably just on the top and won’t show once you turn the binding. www.cambridgelane.com 40
  41. 41. Ready to start turning the bindingHere’s what the back of my quilt now looks like with the bindingmachine-stitched on all the way around. I’m going to use this contrastingthread to mark a nice, (hopefully!) straight line. www.cambridgelane.com 41
  42. 42. Choose your thread and needles!Always use a thread to match your binding so it doesn’t show. Here I amusing a 50-weight cotton thread and a self-threading needle. www.cambridgelane.com 42
  43. 43. Make a knotI thread my needle and make a rather substantial knot, one that will holdup to a gentle tug. www.cambridgelane.com 43
  44. 44. Put the needle through just anywhere, and pull the knot up snug to theinside of the binding seam. Keep the needle just under the seam line onthe backing. www.cambridgelane.com 44
  45. 45. Take the first stitch through the binding, just 2-3 threads in. www.cambridgelane.com 45
  46. 46. Gently roll the binding over to the backing side and pull the thread gentlyto secure. The thread should completely disappear under the binding. www.cambridgelane.com 46
  47. 47. Take next stitch into the backing, just a thread under the seam line (inside thequilt, not the seam), and through the quilt about 1/8 “ or less to catch thebinding again, just a thread or two into the binding. Pull firmly but gently andwork down the binding toward the first corner. www.cambridgelane.com 47
  48. 48. Begin the corner.Upon reaching the corner, take one stitch diagonally at the corner andone stitch into the binding. Pull the binding gently but firmly into thequilt. www.cambridgelane.com 48
  49. 49. See that little corner right at the end of the seam line? www.cambridgelane.com 49
  50. 50. Stitch the binding corner.Take an extra stitch through the back of the quilt and then through thecorner of the binding. Pull it gently and firmly into the quilt, smoothingand pressing with the fingers. www.cambridgelane.com 50
  51. 51. Stitch the corner closedIf you think it important to stitch the binding corners closed (and somejudges do notice this), now’s the perfect time to do that. Stitch to thetop corner and then back around the front of the corner. www.cambridgelane.com 51
  52. 52. I’ve stitched the back corner closed and now going to finish the front ofit. www.cambridgelane.com 52
  53. 53. Here’s the front corner stitched closed. www.cambridgelane.com 53
  54. 54. Back to the back of the quilt!After closing the front seam of the binding, I’ll just come right backthrough to the corner and begin sewing down the next side. www.cambridgelane.com 54
  55. 55. The back of the quiltHere’s the back of that corner. www.cambridgelane.com 55
  56. 56. The finished cornerHere’s the front of the quilt! The corner is square, the binding is filledout, the stitches are invisible. And if I can do this, YOU can do this! www.cambridgelane.com 56
  57. 57. To add a hanging sleeve to your quilt, a great video is onthe American Quilt Society YouTube channel. It covers theofficial sizes and making the extra space so that the quilthangs nicely.I hope this is helpful – please feel free to send me anysuggestions or comments! And let me know if there’ssomething else I can show you how I do! - Marybeth www.cambridgelane.com 57

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