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Technology Transfer in the Renewable Energy
Space: Key Challenges and Opportunities for
the Technology Licensing Community...
CambridgeIP Snapshot



CambridgeIP is an innovative and cost-effective
  provider of:
      • Actionable IP intelligence
...
CambridgeIP has developed a comprehensive capability in
deploying actionable IP-based business intelligence



Precise def...
Example: Assignee & Inventor Network Analysis

We discover inventor networks relevant to a client’s technology
  space
Tha...
Our work in the renewable space

A sample of projects in the past year:
        Focus Area                               K...
Renewable Energy: The Broader Context
• We are in the early stages of a transition to a low-
  carbon economy
      – The ...
Renewable are already mainstream:
Example PV Space
PV Competitive Space: Key Players' IP Portfolios
             Company n...
What is the impact on the business of IP
professionals?
We are already seeing the impact in the composition of our
 deal f...
Policy Framework & Economic Context
It is now recognised that the key problem for Climate Change strategies is
    carbon ...
There are long-term challenges to how IP
Management is practiced

Two elements to a successful and rapid transition
 to a ...
Tensions in the current system may build up…

If the current patent system and licensing practices are
   seen as a barrie...
There is a lot that we can do to lead the debate!
The licensing professionals community is in a unique position to pro-act...
In Conclusion: Some Questions to Consider


• What are the innovative IP licensing regimes we have seen
  in the past that...
…and finally…


Feel free to discuss your specific IP Intelligence requirements with us

Sign up to our Newsletter and vis...
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Technology Transfer in the Renewable Energy Space: Key Challenges and Opportunities for the Technology Licensing Community

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CambridgeIP presentation to the \"Licensing Executives Society\" Annual Meeting 2008. We identified the need for creative IP management and royalty sharing model to meet the renewable energy technology transfer needs in coming years

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Technology Transfer in the Renewable Energy Space: Key Challenges and Opportunities for the Technology Licensing Community

  1. 1. Technology Transfer in the Renewable Energy Space: Key Challenges and Opportunities for the Technology Licensing Community Ilian Iliev (CEO) , CambridgeIP Ltd To: Licensing Executives Society Annual Meeting 2nd July, 2008 © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved..
  2. 2. CambridgeIP Snapshot CambridgeIP is an innovative and cost-effective provider of: • Actionable IP intelligence • To the technology sector Number of New Patent Applications by Year 228 • In the UK and internationally 204 140 149 102 97 82 75 71 76 71 61 43 45 38 37 32 34 We are not a legal service provider: 26 27 16 6 2006 2002 2003 2000 2005 1988 1998 1986 1989 1996 1999 2004 1992 1993 2001 1990 1985 1995 1991 1987 1997 1994 • IP Lawyers are our clients too We have offices in Cambridge and London, and 100% 5 Year Growth of Technology Field and Share of All Biosensors Field % of P atents in Last 5 years % of A ll P atents in Field 50% Technology Field as % of All Biosensor Patents 90% 45% Patents Filed in last 5 Years as % of Total 80% 40% representation in Boston, USA 70% 60% 50% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 30% 15% 20% 10% 10% 5% 0% 0% Electrochemical Acoustic Wave Thermometric Fluorescence Chain Reaction Optical Biomimetic Paramagnetic Spectroscopy Photoacoustic Piezoelectric Pyrolysis Polymerase Raman Surface © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 2
  3. 3. CambridgeIP has developed a comprehensive capability in deploying actionable IP-based business intelligence Precise definition of your technology Related Industrial applications History and trends space & key patent ranking Patent Distribution: Top 5 IPCs Number of New Patent Applications by Year H01R 12/00, 5.8% 250 2 28 H01R 13/22, 5.4% 204 H01R 13/24, 5.3% 2 00 149 H01R 11/11, 5.1% 140 150 Development over Time of the Relevant Industry Segments 102 40 97 1 00 82 H01R 11/28, 4.5% Patent Ranking: Score Distribution 75 71 76 71 40 35 61 Keywords Weighting Weight 43 45 50 30 38 37 35 Tech. descriptor 1 2 3 2 34 27 26 Tech. descriptor 2 2 25 16 3 2 4 2 5 6 7 6 30 Tech. descriptor 3 2 1 1 Tech. descriptor 4 2 0 20 2006 2002 2003 2000 2005 1988 1998 2001 1986 1989 1996 1999 2004 1982 1992 1983 1993 1980 1990 1985 1995 1981 1991 1987 1997 1976 1979 1984 1994 1973 1974 25 Tech. descriptor 5 2 Tech. descriptor 6 10 15 Score Tech. descriptor 7 10 20 Tech. descriptor 8 8 Other: 74% 10 Tech. descriptor 9 8 © 2007 15 Tech. descriptor 10 10 5 Tech. descriptor 11 10 10 0 1971 1981 1991 1977 1987 1997 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 1974 1976 1979 1984 1986 1989 1994 1996 1999 1972 1982 1992 1973 1978 1983 1988 1993 1998 5 0 A61N 7/00 A61K 9/50 C12N 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Patent number © 2007 Deep Analysis of Corporate IP Inventor Network Analysis Top Inventors & Top Assignees 70 65 Top 10 Assignees and Number of Patents Portfolios Selected Assignees: Patent Portfolio Key Numbers 60 Rank by Assignee Name #Assignee Year of 1st Total Patents in Total # Search 2A 55 # of Patents in Patent Client Patents by Patents Patents Search 2A Application in Industry* Assignee After 2000 in S.2 Search 2 50 1 ASSIGNEE 1 124 1981 2,568 501,746 23 45 2 ASSIGNEE 2 50 1978 3,857 676,142 6 40 40 3 ASSIGNEE 3 46 1975 3,164 720,028 6 4 ASSIGNEE 4 36 1979 3,413 727,743 11 30 5 ASSIGNEE 5 14 1977 2,659 155,148 3 30 26 20 Selected Assignees: Patent Portfolio Key Ratios 19 18 Rank by Assignee Name Assignee Search 2A Search 2A Overall Search 2A 20 16 # of Patents as % Patents as % of Patents as % of Importance Patents: Patents of all Patents All Assignee Assignee All of Client Growth ` in S.2 in Search 2A Patents in Client Patents Industry* for 2000-6 10 Industry* Assignee 1 ASSIGNEE 1 14% 4.8% 0.025% 0.51% 18.5% 0 2 ASSIGNEE 2 6% 1.3% 0.007% 0.57% 12.0% Assignee 1 Assignee 2 Assignee 3 Assignee 4 Assignee 5 Assignee 6 Assignee 7 Assignee 8 Assignee 9 Assignee 3 ASSIGNEE 3 5% 1.5% 0.006% 0.44% 13.0% 10 4 ASSIGNEE 4 4% 1.1% 0.005% 0.47% 30.6% 10 ASSIGNEE 5 2% 0.5% 0.009% 1.71% 21.4% VISIT WWW.CAMBRIDGEIP.COM © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 3
  4. 4. Example: Assignee & Inventor Network Analysis We discover inventor networks relevant to a client’s technology space That enables clients to identify more licensing opportunities, and develop an approach strategy Legend Blue Bubble: Inventor Red Bubble: Patent Owner (Assignee) Bubble Size: # of Patents Line Thickness: # of joint patents © 2008 © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 4
  5. 5. Our work in the renewable space A sample of projects in the past year: Focus Area Key Questions Alternative Refrigeration ID incumbents’ R&D strategy Technologies Photo-Voltaics Identify value chain changes Air Supply Systems to Fuel- Licensing strategy development & competitor Cells monitoring BioMass Electricity Identify key developing economy world players Clean Coal Technology R&D portfolio of major corporate players We are also working with Climate Strategies to identify technology transfer trends in the renewable space © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 5
  6. 6. Renewable Energy: The Broader Context • We are in the early stages of a transition to a low- carbon economy – The last time we did this was in the industrialisation era (electricity, rail, steam) – We are now doing it in a 20-30 year span • This transition will be characterised by technology development and technology deployment on a massive scale – Trillions of dollars of investment in R&D & deployment – Strong role for Government in funding, regulatory frameworks and market creation As a professional community we need to take into account the institutional framework which is emerging: and how that impacts IP management options for our clients © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 6
  7. 7. Renewable are already mainstream: Example PV Space PV Competitive Space: Key Players' IP Portfolios Company name The total number of # of PV patents held Country patents held by the by the company company Japanese Top 10 cell manufacturers Conglomerates Sharp 140,836 433 Japan dominate the Sanyo 143,645 276 Japan patenting space Kyocera 36,108 63 Japan BP Solar 99 15 EU Shell Solar 51 14 US Schott Solar 56 11 EU The Oil majors are JFE Steel Electric Mitsubishi 248,251 5,156 8 2 Japan also entering this Selected EU cell manufacturers space Würth Solar - DE 4 EU SollandSolar -Nl 228 nil or n/a nil or n/a Solterra - Swiss 0 0 EU Selected Jp cell manufacturers Kaneka Solartech 4,927 295 Japan Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 7,545 30 Japan Fuji Electric 56,841 82 Japan Selected US cell manufacturers GE Energy 76 nil or n/a US Solar Power Ind. 77 15 US Ebara Solar 129 12 US SunPower 313 25 Source: Own research © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 7
  8. 8. What is the impact on the business of IP professionals? We are already seeing the impact in the composition of our deal flow: • AIM has been a major destination for alternative energy start-ups • Increased VC investment in alternative energy start-ups • Boom in activity by established corporations • Increased deal flow from University TTOs • Government funding into research (KTNs, Carbon Trust, NESTA, etc.) So far, this has been a patent-intensive field, combining complex multi- disciplinary technologies So far, so good… © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 8
  9. 9. Policy Framework & Economic Context It is now recognised that the key problem for Climate Change strategies is carbon emissions from high-growth developing economies, such as India & China The majority of energy infrastructure investment in the next 20-30 years will be in India and China combined: it is the growth opportunity Already major corporate players are expressing fears about protection of IP by selling & co-developing technology in these markets Policy Framework • The UN Climate Change Conference and the Bali Action Plan (2007) are setting the framework: – All countries are jointly responsible for emissions reductions – Have to pursue measurable, reportable and verifiable actions – Developed countries have obligations to support developing countries through, among other things, technology transfer © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 9
  10. 10. There are long-term challenges to how IP Management is practiced Two elements to a successful and rapid transition to a low-carbon economy 1. Rapid development of new technologies 2. Rapid deployment and diffusion of these technologies Herein lies a paradox: • Patents provide the incentives for private actors to innovate • But a strong patent regime may also discourage and slow down the deployment of new technologies © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 10
  11. 11. Tensions in the current system may build up… If the current patent system and licensing practices are seen as a barrier to innovation and technology diffusion of low carbon technologies, you may see: – NGO action to ‘force open’ the IP portfolios – Government action to go around IP rights – Attachment of ‘open sourcing’ conditions to R&D funding It has happened before!!! © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 11
  12. 12. There is a lot that we can do to lead the debate! The licensing professionals community is in a unique position to pro-actively identify the IP licensing regime most conducive which will incentivise both – R&D Investment & collaborative innovation – and Technology diffusion/deployment Past examples of innovative industry-level licensing models Industry Model Mobile Phone Symbian: formed 1998 in partnership with Operating Ericsson, Nokia, Motorola, Psion System Royalty-free access for mobile app. developers WiMax Intel, Cisco, Samsung, Sprint, Alcatel: joint licensing of WiMax patents to limit Royalties costs Pharma: AIDS Differentiated pricing for drugs according to an drugs economy’s level of development © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 12
  13. 13. In Conclusion: Some Questions to Consider • What are the innovative IP licensing regimes we have seen in the past that could be applied? • How can we balance the interests of incumbents, new entrants and consumers? • What differentiated pricing regimes between different countries can be implemented? • What mechanisms do we have for licensing revenue administration in pooled IP portfolio? • How can we increase transparency? E.g. licensing reporting framework, benchmarking, valuation principles… © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 13
  14. 14. …and finally… Feel free to discuss your specific IP Intelligence requirements with us Sign up to our Newsletter and visit our blog to get regular IP Intelligence insights Thank You ! Ilian Iliev (CEO and Founder) www.cambridgeip.com Tel: 01223 370 098 © 2008 CambridgeIP. All rights reserved.. 14

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