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Something Stinks: Issues Surrounding Access to Public Space Recycling and Socioeconomic Inequality

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Something Stinks: Issues Surrounding Access to Public Space Recycling and Socioeconomic Inequality

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Something Stinks: Issues Surrounding Access to Public Space Recycling and Socioeconomic Inequality

  1. 1. Something Stinks: Issues Surrounding Socio-Economic Inequality and Access to Public Space Recycling Services Resources Conservation and Recycling (Revising) By: Dr. Calvin Lakhan http://wastewiki.info.yorku.ca/ lakhanc@yorku.ca
  2. 2. Overview • Study undertook an examination of the relationship between household income levels and access to public space recycling services • Data collected over a five month period from 47 neighborhoods in the GTA • Is there a link between household income levels and access to public space recycling, litter, and bin contamination
  3. 3. Methods • Three municipalities in the GTA (Toronto, Peel and York Region) • Regression model developed to see link between # of bins per sq km, household income, and population density • High traffic public space areas sampled (transit shelters, parks etc) • Anecdotal observations surrounding littering and bin contamination levels
  4. 4. Results • Statistically significant correlation between household income and neighborhood income levels • Higher incidences of litter and bin contamination in poorer communities • Fewer opportunities to recycle in public spaces in lower income neighborhoods
  5. 5. Conclusions • Access to recycling linked to socio economic factors • Is the issue demand (do households in poorer income communities not prioritize access to recycling) or supply (municipalities do not put bins in lower income neighborhoods) side • Likely both • How do we address these issues? Is access to recycling a “right” or a “privilege”?
  6. 6. Conclusions • Access to recycling linked to socio economic factors • Is the issue demand (do households in poorer income communities not prioritize access to recycling) or supply (municipalities do not put bins in lower income neighborhoods) side • Likely both • How do we address these issues? Is access to recycling a “right” or a “privilege”?

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