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Ap feb scene

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Ap feb scene

  1. 1. Wisconsin Film Talent for Celebrating 15Years! SC NE E APPLETON • FOX CITIES EDITION | WWW.SCENENEWSPAPER.COM | FEBRUARY 2016 VOLUNTARY 75¢
  2. 2. L2  |  SceneNewspaper.com  |  Appleton • Fox Cities | February 2016 Chic Unique Affordable 216 Main Street Menasha WI 111 W. Fulton St., Waupaca, WI therevivalmail@gmail.com 165 North Park Avenue Neenah, WI 54956-2294 Telephone: 920.751.4658 bmmglass.com Free General Admission for Everyone, Always This exhibition is supported in part by a grant from theWisconsin Arts Board with funds from the state of Wisconsin andThe National Endowment for the Arts. A very special thank you goes to LinoTagliapietra, Inc., Schantz Galleries and Bonnie Marx for assistance in organizing the exhibition. Transcending Time a Survey of Works in Glass by Italian Maestro Lino Tagliapietra October 8, 2015 • February 14, 2016 Free Admission–Hours: TU–SA, 10am to 4:30pm, SU 1–4:30pm A A C GArt Alliance for Contemporary Glass Fenice, 2011 Photo by Russell Johnson 165 N. Park Avenue Neenah bmmglass.com
  3. 3. February 2016  |  Appleton • Fox Cities  |  SceneNewspaper.com  |  L3 Advertising deadline for March is February 20 at 5 p.m. Submit ads to ads@scenenewspaper.com.The SCENE is published monthly by Calumet Press, Inc.The SCENE provides news and commentary on politics, current events, arts and entertainment, and daily living.We retain sole ownership of all non-syndicated editorial work and staff-produced advertisements contained herein. No duplication is allowed without permission from Calumet Press,Inc.2016. PO Box 227 •Chilton,WI 53014 •920-849-4551 Calumet PRESSINC. R18 SCENE STAFF Publisher James Moran • 920.418.1777 jmoran@scenenewspaper.com Associate Publisher Norma Jean Fochs • 715.254.6324 njfochs@scenenewspaper.com Ad Sales Maureen Andrejeski 920.522.2381 • mo@scenenewspaper.com CONTRIBUTORS L8 L6 COVER STORY R18 Wildwood Film Festival FINE ARTS R6 Foxy Finds FOOD & DRINK R2 Brewmaster R4 Bravissimo to A’Bravo ENTERTAINMENT L6 Salsa Manzana R4 Iola Winter Carnival R5 Oshkosh Public Museum R8 Dobie Maxwell R8 “Monkey in the Middle” R10 Miss Molly to Release “Snow” R12 Dracula R13 Peridot releases “Lonely Work” R14 Postcards from Milwaukee R15 Eaa’s Hops & Props R16 Concert Watch R18 Wildwood Film Festival NEWS & VIEWS L7 Media Rants L8 Rohn’s Rants L9 Right-Wing Nut OUTDOORS R17 Rob Zimmer EVENT CALENDARS R20 Live Music L24 The Big Events CONTENTS Steve Lonsway Patrick Mares Jean Detjen Dobie Maxwell George Halas Blaine Schultz Rob Zimmer Jane Spietz Joshua Grover-David Patterson Tony Palmeri Rohn W Bishop Robert E Meyer APPLETON • FOX CITIES EDITION 5 O’clock Somewhere Michiel’s Menasha
  4. 4. L4  |  SceneNewspaper.com  |  Appleton • Fox Cities | February 2016 Picture Yourself in Winnebago County Parks! Have we got a trail for you! Trail may vary slightly due to snow conditions.
  5. 5. February 2016  |  Appleton • Fox Cities  |  SceneNewspaper.com  |  L5 Picture Yourself in Winnebago County Parks! Have we got a trail for you! Trail may vary slightly due to snow conditions.
  6. 6. L6  |  SceneNewspaper.com  |  Appleton • Fox Cities | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // SALSA MANZANA BY GEORGE HALAS As previously reported by The Inquisition, Salsa Manzana is one of the most fun bands in the Fox Cities and plays music to which one simply must dance. On February 21st at The Lawrence University Memorial Chapel at 7:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.), there will be a unique opportunity to have fun, dance and support a good cause. Salsa Manzana will join forces with Zeke and Pamela Cribbs of Boogie Ballroom Dance for an evening of music and dancing to support BLUME Haiti (Building Leaders Using Music Education), a non-profit organization that seeks to change the life trajectory of children in Haiti by sup- porting music programs throughout the island. Led by Professor of Music Janet Anthony, Lawrence has been involved in Haiti for almost twenty years. “I first went to Haiti in 1996,” Anthony said. “Since then almost 80 students and several faculty, Jose Encarnacion, Director of Jazz Studies, being the latest, have gone to Haiti to teach with me.  In 2012, along with Haitian colleagues and a number of long- term volunteer teachers including four LU alumni, we formed BLUME Haiti (http://www.blumehaiti.org/), a non-profit that works with Haitian and international partners to develop leadership skills, awaken individual potential and create opportunities for social and civic collaboration and economic development through music education and performance.” In addition to this fabulous 12-piece band featur- ing some of the Fox Cities’ best musicians – including Encarnacion, as well as other LU professors and former students - playing salsa, merengue, Brazilian, Latin jazz, cha cha, bolero and other fun music, the suggested $10.00 donation ($5 for students) includes an auc- tion of painted cellos, an open dance floor and a dance lesson with Zeke and Pamela Cribbs. Salsa Manzana coming to Lawrence University
  7. 7. NEWS & VIEWS  //  MEDIA RANTS February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | L7 BY TONY PALMERI Since 1976, Sonoma State University’s Project Censored has challenged the news media to meet their First Amendment responsibilities. Annually the Project compiles a volume of news stories “under- reported, ignored, misrepresented, or censored in the United States.” Walter Cronkite said that “Project Censored is one of the organizations that we should listen to, to be assured that our newspapers and our broadcasting outlets are practicing thorough and ethical journalism.” Bestsell- ing author and activist Naomi Wolf asserts that, “Project Censored is a lifeline to the world’s most urgent and significant stories.”  P r o j e c t C e n s o r e d is famous i t s n o n - traditional definition of censorship, referring to it as “anything that interferes with the free flow of infor- mation in a society that purports to have a free press.” They argue that censorship includes not just stories that were never published, but also “those that get such restricted distri- bution that few in the public are likely to know about them.” Censored 2016: Media Freedom on the Line (Seven Stories Press) continues the Project’s annual exploration of what a panel of judges determines to be the top 25 most censored stories of the year. The top three are (1) “Half of global wealth owned by the 1 percent,” (2) “Oil industry illegally dumps fracking wastewa- ter,” and (3) “89 percent of Pakistani drone victims not identifiable as militants.” I’d say that #3 is a good answer to the question “why do they hate us?” In fact, just about every story covered by Project Censored is an answer to the question of why there is so much despair and ten- sion in the world. If mainstream media met its responsibility to give the stories proper treatment, we would of course not see an end to despair and tension. But we WOULD see less ignorance and confusion about the causes of trouble in the world, and less ignorance always leads to more positive action on behalf of reform. Over the years when I have written about Project Censored, some readers have responded by saying that the organization’s approach to censorship seems too con- spiratorial. Such readers argue that news media can only cover so much given time and space constraints, and to favor some stories over others probably has more to do with commercial pressures and “giving the audience what it wants,” rather than actively “censoring,” certain stories. I think there is some legitimacy to that critique; the northeast Wisconsin corporate media wall to wall Packer coverage for 20 to 30 weeks out of the year probably has more to do with a ratings calculation as opposed to news directors willingly dumbing down the audience’s knowledge of critical labor, political, environmental and other chal- lenges facing regional communities. Sometimes censorship is the simple result of journalistic laziness. My spouse, Lori and I recently experi- enced the consequences of journalistic lazi- ness when she decided to take out nomi- nation papers to run in the April election for Oshkosh Common Council. When she took out the papers in December, she was told by the Oshkosh City Clerk’s office that she needed to obtain 200-400 signa- tures by January 5th. When I asked my friend and former Oshkosh Mayor Paul Esslinger if he could get some signatures, he pointed out that the requirement was actually 100-200 signatures. Republican Senator Rick Gudex and Republican Rep- resentative Jeremy Thiesfeldt were able to get the law changed so as to promote the entry of more candidates in city council races. When Lori showed up to get her 120 signatures certified on January 4th, she was told by the Clerk’s office that the requirement for Oshkosh was still 200-400 signatures; for some unclear reason they believed the law did not apply in a place represented by one of its chief sponsors (Senator Gudex). Even the members of the Oshkosh Common Council we contacted about the signature requirement were not aware of the law. On the morning of Janu- ary 5th, the Clerk’s office contacted Lori to say that they called the Government Accountability Board in Madison and that in fact the requirement was 100-200 sig- natures. Lori will be on the ballot in April. We will never know if potential candidates were deterred from running because they were given inaccurate information. Sure, the Clerk’s office should know the law. But the real problem in my judgement was that the Gannett press, local television and local radio simply did an awful job of reporting on the impending campaign season, and the requirements for running. These are the same media who regularly lament the shortage of candidates. I would argue that the mass media minimization of the enthusiasm for Bernie Sand- ers’ presidential campaign was the most cen- sored national story of 2015. Sa n d e r s h a s spoken to record crowds, raised huge amounts of money from mostly small donations, and c o m p l e t e l y shifted the Dem- ocratic Party pri- mary debate to the left. He also polls well against any Republican nominee. All that, and yet to the New York Times and other establishment media, Sanders is virtually invisible. One New York Times article quoted a senior citizen Trump supporter who said that, “This election is the first in my life where we can change what it means to be a Republican.” Memo to the Times: the same is true for the Democrats this year—your readers would know that, if you would stop cen- soring Bernie’s campaign! Tony Palmeri (palmeri.tony@gmail.com) is a professor of communication studies at UW Oshkosh. Censored in 2015
  8. 8. NEWS & VIEWS  //  ROHN’S RANTS L8  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 BY ROHN W. BISHOP Late in 2015 State Senator Rick Gudex announced he would not be seeking another term as a state senator. This was disappointing news because Rick Gudex is a unique politician. Coming from a blue collar private sector manufactur- ing background, Gudex understood the plight of regular middle class Wisconsites, unlike much of the political class who float through life looking for ways to enhance their government pension. Gudex was also unique in another way, he wasn’t a bull sh**er. It takes a special kind of ‘profile in courage,’ to represent what has become an evenly divided dis- trict, and tell people the truth, instead of what they want to hear. Gudex would speak to a room and explain to people that the transportation budget is a mess, and that we have trans- portation projects that are important to complete, both for our economy and the safety of our drivers, but to pay for it we need to raise the gas tax and the registra- tion fee. Not exactly a popular position. He had to tell both union guys, and some of the area’s largest employers (and Republican Party donors) both of whom strongly opposed ‘Right to Work’ legisla- tion, that he was voting for ‘Right to Work’ because he believes in the freedom to choose, while at the same time explaining to conservative activists being whipped up by Charlie Sykes that he opposed repeal- ing ‘Prevailing Wage,’ because those same union guys and area employers depended on the wage to earn a good living. Most importantly, Gudex was a strong advocate for the unborn, and our Second Amendment Rights, while at the same time he would also be a strong supporter of Governor Walker and defender of ACT 10; while representing the senate district with the second most government workers living within it. Not an easy task. Facing a tough, but likely re-election bid in 2016, and a leadership team he believes threw him under the ‘Prevailing Wage’ bus, Gudex decided to accept an offer, and return to the private sector. Seeing that Rick Gudex was the only senator who’d ever show up on time for events, he’s probably more suited for the private sector anyway. Now What? Once Assembly Representatives Michael Schraa and Jeremy Thiesfeldt made it clear they had no interest in run- ning, the Republican Party is wisely turn- ing to another blue collar private sector guy to succeed Gudex, Republican Party of Fond du Lac County Chairman Dan Feyen. Much like Gudex four years ago, Feyen starts a campaign with low name ID, little money, and is not the preferred candidate of the ‘Madison establishment.’ However, after close to a decade of behind-the- scenes grassroots work in the conservative Republican movement, Feyen is very well connected and is off to a good fundraising start. Feyen, 47, has a connect-ability to the working class district that is the 18th. With one of his children attending UW- Madison and another in public high school, it’s an “everyman” story that many can relate to, and in a year of crabby voters looking for outsiders to run, it might be a perfect fit. (Full disclosure: I serve as Treasure for the FDL GOP and am a volunteer on Feyen’s campaign.) In what is likely to be an expensive race that could determine control of the state senate, it’s likely to be a hard fought and contentious race. The 18th senate district was once a Republican safe seat, with Scott McCallum and Carol Roessler holding onto the seat for many years, easily winning re-election, but since 2008 it’s become something of toss-up. That said, I think this seat still leans Republican. In 2008, with no incumbent in the race, Randy Hopper was elected over Jessica King by 163 votes, in a terrible year to be a Republican and when Obama was winning Wisconsin by 14 points. Hopper would lose a post ACT-10 recall election in 2011, but only by 1,874 votes, at the height of the ACT-10 backlash, and during his messy divorce. A year and a half later, in 2012, another bad year for Republicans, Rick Gudex would reclaim the seat for the GOP with a 601 vote victory over King. I also contend the 2016 electorate won’t be as Democratic as it was in 08 and 12, when people, especially young people, were jazzed up to vote for America’s first black president. Hillary Clinton, the Obama of 2016, just doesn’t excite people as much as did the Obama of 2008. In 2000 and 2004 George W. Bush lost Wisconsin by very close margins, both years in which Carol Roessler easily won re-election. Assuming an electorate more matching of historical norms, and no major screw-ups by the Republicans, (like nominating Trump) this is a seat the GOP should be able to hold onto. What will be interesting to watch in the battle for control of the chamber is, will there be other retirements on the GOP side? Can Dave Hansen survive his “tweet- gate” scandal? Will former Packer Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila challenge Hansen? Will the GOP find a credible challenger to Jennifer Schilling? 2016. It should be an interesting year! Rohn W. Bishop is a monthly contributor to Scene Newspapers. Follow Rohn on Twitter: @RohnWBishop http://new.scenenewspaper.com/category/ entertainment/rohns-rants/ The 18th Senate District and the Fight for Control of the Senate
  9. 9. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R1 Presented by Saturday, March 5, 2016 EAA AirVenture Museum | 7-10 p.m. VIP Dining Experience at 5:30 p.m. For tickets and more information visit EAA.org/HopsProps
  10. 10. R2  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 FOOD & DRINK  //  BREWMASTER BY STEVE LONSWAY This month’s beer report was derived from a recent purchase at our local beer outlet. The brew team of Stone Arch Brew House are hopheads at heart so we wanted to focus on more of a malty brew for this article. To get off our normally beaten path a bit, we chose to go with a Belgian-style that accents the maltiness of the brew. Another reason this was purchased is that every year, to celebrate our anniversary, we brew a Grand Cru. Ours is named Inaugural Brew Grand Cru and when we release it each year on January 11th, we bring out samples from our previous batches. We offer lateral tastings of the Grand Cru and this past month we offered four years worth. It is astonishing the changes that transpire during the years of cold storage. It really adds complexity to an already very complex beer and really rounds out the smoothness. So with the Inaugural Brew Grand Cru fresh on our minds, we chose to report on Ale Asylum’s Mercy Grand Cru. The blue, black and white label of the Mercy made the purchasing decision a bit easier. Three very unique, demonic figures standing as if on guard with arms crossed almost daring you to buy it. Above their confident heads is a brief description of the beer that resides within. A nice touch for those who may not be all that familiar with the Grand Cru style. As we poured the long neck bottles into our snifters (which is the glassware we would recommend for this style), very little head appeared on the surface. The carbonation is evident in taste but not so much in its appearance. As we worked our ways through the samples, there was little evidence of lacing. The appearance was pleasant in the glass. Deep mahogany amber with off- white, almost khaki colored head. In the nose of the Mercy Grand Cru, several very distinctive notes were recorded. We detected plum, dates, fig, banana, clove, cherry, brown sugar, dark fruits, malt and strong B e l g i a n yeast tones. As a Grand Cru style d i c t a t e s , complexity in the nose is a must and Ale Asylum did not leave us hanging. The fla- vors detected by our team were even more com- plex than t h e n o s e produced. The same dark fruits, fig, clove, and cherry tones came through in the flavor as well as red wine, spiced fruit, fusel alcohol, candy sugar, caramel, and intense fruitiness. The Mercy Grand Cru finishes with an obvious warming sensation, very tart and a little on the sharp side. As time passes, a whisky smooth finish was experienced, and a bit of a CO2 prickle at the very end. Food pairings for this beer should start with dark fruits, aged cheddar cheese, brie or better yet, bleu cheese. A beef stew or shepherds pie would certainly work as well as a rich cheesecake for the dessert aspect. Head brewer Craig personally paired it with that days Stone Cellar lunch special; Uphoff Farms ham and brick cheese on a pretzel roll, and he claimed it was destiny. A good music pairing would most likely be an old 90’s jazz band with sharp horns on vinyl. On to the makers; Ale Asylum. Housed at 2002 Pankratz Street in Madison, Wis- consin you will find the makers of the Mercy. With an industrial motif you can enjoy their tasting room and unique menu items that focus a bit more on simplicity and aggressive flavors. The menu is a bit limited, but all items come with a sug- gested beer pairing. They will fill growlers as well as sell their six packs and have a decent array of Ale Asylum gear available for purchase as well. They do offer tours every Sunday on the hour between noon and 5:00 p.m. Founded in 2005, Ale Asylum outgrew their original facility and has since moved into a 45,000 square foot building on Pan- kratz Street at a cost of $8 million. With the goal of going statewide in distribution they are experiencing crazy growth as many other craft brewers around the country are experiencing. With their new facility, larger tanks and super-fast bottler, they are set for success. Of course it helps they make awesome brews and have captivated their customer base, or “inmates” as they are called. FINAL WORD: Have Mercy! You will not regret that decision.   Mercy Grand Cru – Ale Asylum Crescent Moon Architectural Salvage since 1987 Antiques & Salvage 537 N. Main St. Oshkosh (920) 232-MOON (6666) www.crescentmoonantiquesandsalvage.com
  11. 11. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R3
  12. 12. R4  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 FOOD & DRINK  //  A’BRAVO BY PATRICK MARES We blew into A Bravo’ on a cold and blustery winter night. The atmosphere in the establishment was a nice counterbal- ance to the wind outside. While the weather may have kept some folks home, there were a few of we hearty souls provid- ing a nice background buzz. As a dangerously smooth spiced hot rum warmed us (and was the best use of cinnamon I’ve found in recent memory) July Beaudwin, co-owner and hands-on manager for the restaurant, provided a his- tory lesson. “A Bravo’ was originally located in the old Larson Canning Factory office,” Beaudwin said. But after seven years, the promised upgrade of the space never hap- pened.” Originally, July had partnered with her sister Greta, but after the move, Mary Faye and Dana Demara joined the team. Fay in particular brings a skill set not always present in a cookery, balancing the books and the paying of finances and vendors. “When we started, A’ Bravo had only nine tables,” Fay said “now we have thirty. That’s a big step up. It’s full service lunch and dinner, plus an incredible Sunday brunch, and we have a full bar.” The staff has input as well. “We invite all who work for us to offer their opinions,” July said “to help decide the season’s upcoming recipes and menu items. We think it’s a good idea to get everyone’s thoughts. We’ll brainstorm together, and we’re all really proud of that. Plus, it’s fun, and afterward, everyone feels fat because we eat a lot of what might get on the final menu. Hey, we have to taste it to know what we’re talking about with our custom- ers...right?” (laugh) Seared Ahi Tuna The seared Ahi picked up more of the smokey grilled flavor than I’d typically associate with this dish. Solid, and differ- ent from the pack, its no wonder this is a staple. Sesame encrusted ahi tuna over jas- mine rice, spicy spinach, with a sesame vinaigrette & spicy peanuts & almonds. Suggested wine: Ponzi Pinot Gris Lobster Mac & Cheese - The Best Ever This lobster pasta was just perfectly but- tery, complementing the prominent chunks of lobster within. An incredibly creamy blend of four gour- met cheeses and lobster pieces, served piping hot with truffle toast on the side. Bianca Pizza Cutting out the tomatoes is a bold step for pizza. Once again, more savory than its traditional cousin with red sauce. Grilled flatbread topped with a mild garlic cream sauce, mozzarella, prosciutto, fresh basil chiffonade and finished with a drizzle of truffle oil, a sprinkle of panko, then baked. Bravissimo to A’Bravo Iola Winter Carnival ENTERTAINMENT // IOLA WINTER CARNIVAL
  13. 13. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R5 ENTERTAINMENT // BE THE DINOSAUR Find us on Facebook! LEINIE’S FRIDAY FISH FRY! Beer Battered Shrimp (Thai Chili, Garlic Butter or Regular) Lightly Hand-Breaded Baby Walleye (Regular or Cajun) Leinie’s Beer Battered Cod Crispy Panko Breaded Cod Hand-Breaded Haddock (Regular or Cajun) Hand-Breaded Butterflied Lake Perch (Regular or Cajun) Grilled 8 Oz. Ribeye Surf N Turf Grilled 8 Oz. Ribeye with Beer Battered Shrimp UPCOMING EVENTS: February 6 - Kitty Corona February 13 - No Stone Soup February 20 - Dave Olsen Band February 27 - Grayling Pingel March 5 - The Hits Where GOOD TIMES & GOOD FOOD come together! live Music • Food • Great atmosphere Book Your Private Parties with Us! The Bridge Bar & Restaurant 101 W Main St. Fremont, Wisconsin 54940 (920) 446–3300 www.bridgebarfremont.com The annual Deck the Halls holiday experience at the Oshkosh Public Museum has truly become a community event. In staying true to its mission, the Museum provided free admission to 526 children under age 18 during this exhibi- tion and over 1,500 adults took advantage of the reduced admission rate. In addition, over 200 local students and caregivers vis- ited as part of a group field trip. Holiday decorations reminiscent of the times filled the historic Sawyer home from November to January, and the life- size Christmas Village exhibit windows showcased a collection of toys on loan from volunteers and community members. The 2016 Christmas Village exhibit theme is “miniature holiday trees,” and once again the Museum is reaching out to the community to help decorate the display cases. Contact Curator Debra Daubert at 920-236-5767 or email ddaubert@ ci.oshkosh.wi.us for more information if you are interested in donating a decorated tree. An exhibition opening premier for Be the Dinosaur™ will be held on Monday, February 1. The Museum will be open from 10 am to 4:30 pm for this special event, and Joseph E. Peterson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology at UW-Oshkosh, will present “Behaviors of Dinosaurs” starting at 3 pm. Dr. Peterson has been studying various injuries in Cretaceous dinosaurs over the last ten years. He will discuss his research on these injuries, or “paleopathologies,” and how they can provide insight into the paleobiology and behaviors of dinosaurs. The lecture is free with general admission and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Pre-registration is requested by contacting Karla Szekeres at 920-236- 5763 or email kszekeres@ci.oshkosh.wi.us. Be the Dinosaur™ is a groundbreaking fusion of state-of-the-art video game tech- nology and traditional exhibits featuring full-size dinosaur bones, a paleontology field station, a Safari Jeep and much more. Unleash your wild side and experience the largest and most complex restoration of an extinct ecosystem ever created. The exhibit will be on view until May 16. Regular hours at the Oshkosh Public Museum, 1331 Algoma Boulevard, are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am−4:30 pm and Sunday from 1 pm−4:30 pm. For more information about the Museum’s program- ming events and exciting exhibits, visit oshkoshmuseum.org, call 920.236.5799 or email museum@ci.oshkosh.wi.us. About the Oshkosh Public Museum The Oshkosh Public Museum is a regional history museum, nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Housed in the historic Sawyer home since 1924, the Museum is entrusted with the care of approximately 250,000 artifacts and historical documents repre- senting all aspects of the region’s people and heritage. The Museum is dedicated to excellence in preservation of historical col- lections strongly focused around the Fox River and the extensive Winnebago water- shed; interactively communicating the story of Oshkosh and the Lake Winnebago region through well-researched, quality exhibitions, programs and publications; and engaging guests in ways that inspire discovery. For admission, hours and more information about the Museum’s exciting exhibits and events, visit oshkoshmuseum. org, call 920.236.5799 or email museum@ci.oshkosh.wi.us. Oshkosh Public Museum Be the Dinosaur Exhibit Opening!
  14. 14. R6  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016R6  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | September 2015 FINE ARTS  //  FOXY FINDS Foxy FindsBY JEAN DETJEN,ARTFUL LIVING Cheers to living artFULLY in the heart of Wisconsin! Send your sugges- tions for Jean’s Foxy Finds to jdetjen@ scenenewspaper.com Illuminate your world with this repurposed globe pendant light fixture by Creative Touch Designs, Menasha. $35. Truly a one-of- a-kind conversation piece! Creative Touch Designs refurbishes old furniture and found items into something unique and beautiful for your home or work space. These eco-friendly Urban Junket hand- bags bring out the best in both form and func- tion. Bold hues and smart design features make these undeniably covetable. Choose from a variety of colors, sizes and styles; prices vary. Found at The Gathered Earth, Appleton, a place to gather, create, and reveal your unique spirit. What’s not to love about these heart themed original painted art squares? Hang on a wall or prop on a shelf singly or in groupings. Discovered at Art on Artesia by Lisa Ritchie, Malone. Choose from a vari- ety of sizes and design motifs. Prices range from $19-39. Alpaca sweat- ers for men and women keep a body toasty with a retro vibe. A variety of styles, colors and sizes - in- cluding Unisex - are available. $45.. Pick one that catches your eye at Satori Imports, a downtown Oshkosh store since 1969 dedicated to providing an everyday shopping experience that is unmistakable, enlighten- ing, beyond description. Rose Quartz and Serenity Pantone 2016 colors of the year take center stage with this gorgeous “curvy girl” tunic by Umgee. Soft and flowy cotton/poly blend. Sizes XL-2XL. $38. Score this at Lillians of Fond du Lac where you can find trendy and affordable women’s fashions, footwear, accessories and more. Keep your tiny ones cozy warm with one of these Green 3 Apparel recyled cot- ton Junior Throws. Several darling motifs to choose from, $29.99 each. Find these at Just Act Natural in downtown Appleton, where you will discover many eco-friendly products that will benefit the well- being of your body, home, community and planet. Top off your boots in style with these Crochet Lace Leg Warmer Boot Socks by Noelle. $24. Many colors and designs to choose from with matching accessories to boot!. Find these in the trendy new accessory line at Joseph’s Shoes, Appleton, serving the Fox Cities with great service, footwear and more from all over the world since 1971.
  15. 15. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R7 Hwy Q over looking the Chain O’Lakes 715-258-8289 www.wheelhouserestaurant.com THE WHEELHOUSE PRESENTS, LIVE MUSIC: “WEDNESDAY WITH WAGS” YOUR HOST AND DRUMMER EXTRAORDINAIRE, TONY “WAGS” WAGNER JOINS THESE FINE MUSICIANS FOR EACH PERFORMANCE 2/10 LATIN JASS: WAMI Award Winners: “VIVO” (Wisconsin Area Music Industry). Voted best Jazz Group of 2015. Warren Wiegratz on Sax & Keys. Pam Duronio, Vocalist. WIth Tim Stemper on guitar and Charlie Sauter on bass. 2/24 ORIGINAL BLUES: Featured artist “Otis & The Alligators” The reunion tour; featuring Otis McLennon on blues harp and vocals. Joe Fittante on keyboards and vocals and Jim Prideaux on guitar and Kenny Stevenson on bass. 3/9 ORIGINAL BLUES: Featuring Artist Perry Weber of “The Jimmy’s” on guitar and vocals Larry “3rd Degree” Byrne on keyboards. Tom McCarty on base. 3/23 RHYTHM & BLUES: Featuring “MoJoe & Flipside” with Joe Fittante on keyboards and vocals, Jim Prideaux on guitar and Bill Jordan on vocals and sax. With Charlie Sauter on bass. 4/6 ORIGINAL BLUES: Featuring “Reverend Raven” on guitar and vocals Westside Andy on blues harp and & “P.T.” bass player for The Chain Smoking Alter Boys. 4/20 R&B, JAZZ, FUNK: Featured artists Warren Wiegratz on Sax, and keyboards, Joe Jordan on vocals and Eric Hervey on bass. (all from Streetlife). Special guest Jim Pride- aux on guitar. www.simpsonswaupaca.com Monday to Friday: Open at 11:00 AM Saturday to Sunday: Dining open at 4:00 PM, Bar open at 3:00 PM Visit our Facebook page SINCE 1932 THINK SIMPSON’S FOR THE SUPERBOWL KICK OFF WITH FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS Score a great view from anywhere in the lounge on our 6 hi-def television screens Then complete your experience with a great meal. In addition to our traditional favorites, there are always new & exciting lunch and dinner specials so you are sure to find just what you’re looking for.
  16. 16. R8  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // DOBIE MAXWELL BY DOBIE MAXWELL There comes a point when I think it’s acceptable to ask just how much technol- ogy do we really need? I think that point is now. I can’t speak for anyone else, but I’ve been deeply over my head with all of it for several years now. Five year old kids can run circles around me, and I know it. Email was pretty cool, I must admit. I think I bought my first computer in 1996 or right around there, and it was a desktop behemoth somewhat akin to the old wood grain TVs our grandparents had. I had a dial up AOL connection and I thought I was George Jetson. The future had arrived. I reconnected with old friends online, and made new ones. I was fine with that level of business and had it not gone any further I would be a happy man today. I was never into video games or at the cut- ting edge of needing to have the latest gadgets, and that’s where I got trampled by the herd. Cell phones were another hurdle. I scratched and clawed against getting one for years, as I just couldn’t see a practical need to carry a phone with me for any other reason than my car breaking down. With my luck with cars I should have been one of the very first on the planet to have one. I finally relented around the year 2000 and signed up for a cell phone when I was working in radio in Salt Lake City. The sta- tion had a group discount plan, and I still remember joking on air about how stupid I thought it was for everyone to have to haul them around like modern walkie talkies. I found nothing wrong whatsoever with how the old system was with a phone at home, and others located at strategic locations that could be used by anyone who needed them. Why would we all need to carry our own? Well, I guess none of us actually need to, but it sure has caught our fancy. Who walking the earth in the 21st Century could imagine life without a cell phone? I left mine at home the other day and needed to call someone, and actually tried to find a pay phone. Good luck with that search. I might as well look for two, and if I’d happen to find them I’ll bet Jimmy Hoffa will be talking to Amelia Earhart. I am officially a member of the last dinosaur generation. That’s funny to me, as my grandparents used to look at me as Mr. Spoiled Brat with all the new technology they never had – including indoor plumbing and run- ning water. I heard about all their struggles growing up, ranging from milking cows to cutting wood for heat, and I’d laugh about it. Now everyone is laughing at me. I was at the cell phone store the other day because my, ‘what is supposed to be a smart phone,’ wasn’t functioning properly. It turns out the phone was totally fine, rather I was the moron for not knowing how to program it. Phone - smart. Owner - not. How ironic. The latest obstacle I’ve been fighting is Twitter. Everyone seems to be on it, but I can’t for the life of me see why. Short blasts of meaningless tripe from Ashton Kutcher or Nicki Minaj aren’t a priority in my life, but neither was all the other stuff I now couldn’t live without. I think I need to be very careful before I totally poo poo the idea, but I’m too busy with Facebook and Linkedin, and trying to keep track of everything else I’m not able to keep under control. Life has passed me by. Dobie Maxwell is a stand up comedian and writer from Milwaukee. Visit dobiemaxwell.com ‘TWITTER SHMITTER’ Unique Autobiography of Comedian/ Radio Personality Features Bad Luck, Bikers and a Childhood Best Friend Who Committed TWO Bank Robberies. No Joke! Whatever “normal” is, long time nationally touring comedian Dobie Max- well isn’t it. His life is an amazing story of constant turmoil. Dobie has an incredible talent for being in the proverbial “wrong place at the wrong time”…ALL the time - which is fascinating and funny if it isn’t YOU. Some people get a rough start in life, but Dobie’s start takes the cake, and then some. Born to a drug-abusing mother and, “Outlaws” motorcycle gang member father in Milwaukee, he was estranged from two siblings and raised by his paternal grand- parents from five months old who divorced when he was 11. By the time he finished high school all Dobie had was his best friend. The two became closer than their actual blood brothers, and were each other’s trusted “go to” surrogate family support- ing each other through thick and thin including Dobie’s early years as a standup comedian, local radio personality and pro wrestling promoter. They were inseparable. Dobie was fired from his radio dream job, and called his friend to arrange a cross country road trip to Las Vegas to cheer them both up. His friend had lost his job as head of security at a local bank, and before their trip he decided to ROB that same bank – and stash the money in the trunk of a rental car they used for their trip. Oddly enough, he never told Dobie until almost a year later. The FBI suspected his friend, but could never prove it. Dobie was sworn to secrecy because if he talked he would be an unwitting accomplice. Flush with the thrill of getting away with it, his pal robbed the very same bank AGAIN - this time in a Gorilla Gram outfit. Who would possibly rob a bank in such a wacky manner? Why, a comedian of course! The FBI thought that it was Dobie. Dobie was faced with a horrible choice; turn in his best friend or go to federal prison for a crime he did not commit. Like it or not – and he did not - Dobie became the “Monkey in the Middle.” “Monkey in the Middle” has every- thing from heartache to high adventure, to all out hilarity. The publisher is Eckhartz Press (www.eckhartzpress.com) and the official date of release is Monday March 14th, 2016 – Dobie’s birthday. There will also be a live standup comedy show along with a reading at Zanies Comedy Club at 1548 North Wells Street in Chicago. zanies.com   “Monkey in the Middle”
  17. 17. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R9 搀漀渀ᤠ琀 洀椀猀猀 漀甀爀 昀攀戀爀甀愀爀礀 愀渀搀 洀愀爀挀栀 攀瘀攀渀琀猀℀ 伀渀氀礀 愀琀㨀 䌀愀氀氀 ⠀㤀㈀ ⤀ 㐀㈀㐀ⴀ㈀㌀㔀  漀爀 ㄀ ⠀㠀㘀㘀⤀ 㤀㘀䜀刀䄀一䐀  伀爀搀攀爀 漀渀氀椀渀攀㨀 䜀爀愀渀搀伀瀀攀爀愀䠀漀甀猀攀⸀漀爀最 吀栀攀 匀漀甀渀搀 漀昀 䴀甀猀椀挀 䘀攀戀⸀ ㄀㤀ⴀ㈀  ☀ ㈀㔀ⴀ㈀㜀 愀琀 㜀㨀㌀  倀䴀 䘀攀戀⸀ ㈀㄀ 愀琀 ㈀㨀   倀䴀䄀氀洀漀猀琀Ⰰ 䴀愀椀渀攀 伀猀栀欀漀猀栀 䌀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀 倀氀愀礀攀爀猀 䘀攀戀⸀ ㄀㄀ⴀ㄀㌀ 愀琀 㜀 倀䴀  䘀攀戀⸀ ㄀㐀 愀琀 ㈀ 倀䴀 吀栀攀 䜀爀愀渀搀 伀瀀攀爀愀 䠀漀甀猀攀 䈀漀砀 伀ϻ挀攀  ㄀   䠀椀最栀 䄀瘀攀⸀ 簀 伀猀栀欀漀猀栀Ⰰ 圀䤀 㔀㐀㤀 ㄀  䠀漀甀爀猀㨀 䴀漀渀搀愀礀ⴀ䘀爀椀搀愀礀 ㄀㄀㨀㌀  愀洀ⴀ㔀瀀洀  匀愀琀甀爀搀愀礀 ㄀㄀ 愀洀ⴀ㈀ 瀀洀 䄀 䜀爀愀渀搀 一椀最栀琀 嘀椀挀 䘀攀爀爀愀爀椀 ☀ 匀琀攀瘀攀 䴀愀爀挀栀ⴀ吀漀爀洀  吀漀最攀琀栀攀爀 䄀最愀椀渀 ጠ 䘀漀爀 琀栀攀 䘀椀爀猀琀 吀椀洀攀 匀愀琀甀爀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䴀愀爀挀栀 㔀 愀琀 㜀㨀㌀  倀䴀  䴀漀渀爀漀攀 䌀爀漀猀猀椀渀最 匀甀渀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䴀愀爀挀栀 㘀 愀琀 ㌀ 倀䴀 䌀漀ⴀ匀瀀漀渀猀漀爀㨀 䈀䴀伀 䠀愀爀爀椀猀 䈀愀渀欀愀琀 琀栀攀 伀猀栀欀漀猀栀 䌀漀甀渀琀爀礀 䌀氀甀戀 匀愀琀甀爀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䘀攀戀⸀ ㄀㌀ 愀琀 㘀 倀䴀 
  18. 18. R10  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // THE SPANISH INQUISITION BY GEORGE HALAS There is a rich treasure trove of original music being created in the Fox Cities and some of it fits into pre-existing categories like rock, jazz, country, pop, alt-rock, alt- country, etc. Then there is Miss Molly. The Menasha-based duo, comprised of keyboardist Molly Conrad and guitarist Michael Theroux, incorporates so many different and appealing elements into their music that it fits in only one category: outstanding. Just a little more than two years after the successful release of their debut album, “Fly Tonight,” Conrad and Theroux are in the studio putting the finishing touches on “Snow,” which is targeted for a mid-March release. It is a CD that developed organi- cally into a concept album. “We did not set out to do a concept album,” Conrad said, “but as the songs started coming together, we noticed that they fit together and had a flow. We then wrote an intro, an outro and a number of instrumental passages that connect the songs together.” “The album is not just a bunch of songs thrown together in random order,” Ther- oux added. “I was listening to “Animals” by Pink Floyd when we started – it has a concept aspect to it – and our concept started to emerge as we were recording. We thought it would be cool to tie the songs together.” In addition to jazz, folk, rock, Irish and Celtic influences, the duo cite Bruce Horn- sby, Steve Winwood, Sarah MacLachlin, Tory Amos, Amy Winehouse, and Willy Porter as influences on the songwriting as well as ethnic influences from the British Isles, Spain, India and Africa.  The songwriting process is a collabora- tive effort. Conrad writes most of the melodies and lyrics for the original songs. “I start with piano, find chords that I like, and the melody comes next,” she said. “The lyrics usually flow when the melody has been worked out.” Theroux writes the guitar parts and vocal harmonies as well as creating the intros and outros, bridges and any instru- mental passages the song might need, much of which is initially improvised and later worked into a solo that fits the song. Performing as a duo developed organi- cally as well. In 2011, Conrad wrote a song called “Down.” Theroux heard her practic- ing it, and joined in on guitar. “It worked really well, so we wrote a few more and formed “Miss Molly,” Conrad said. “Michael was really into playing Irish music at the time so we worked on several traditional Irish tunes for our repertoire, and this helped us land our first gig on St. Patrick’s Day at Cannova’s.” They’ve been playing as ‘Miss Molly’ for about four years now. “Since that first show on St. Patrick’s Day 2012 at Cannova’s in Neenah,” she continued. “We were both playing music at the time, but just not together. We started messing around with some original songs and found out we really clicked musically, so we quit what we were doing and joined forces. The rest is history. We still play every other Sunday at Cannova’s.” Conrad is originally from Appleton. She was listening to music, taking piano lessons and writing songs at nine years old. “Before I got my first guitar at 10, I was strumming on a badminton racket and singing,” she said. “My friends and I wrote songs together on the weekends for fun. Our inspirations were ABBA and Elton John as well as a lot of 80’s music and alternative stuff. I was always in choir and jazz vocal groups in college.” A graduate of Appleton West, she studied briefly at UW-Fox Valley and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design  before get- ting a degree in Art Education from the University of Min- nesota. She played music in the folk scene at the Uptown Bar, The Bryant Lake Bowl, 7th St. Entry and local coffee shops. Both Conrad and Theroux teach music in the Fox Cities area. She teaches piano and composition at their studio in Mena- sha while he teaches guitar, bass and several other stringed and percussive instruments at Island Music in Neenah.  Theroux grew up in Grand Forks, North Dakota. He got his first guitar at 12 years old, inspired after attending a Christopher Parkening concert with his mother. He studied classical guitar for a short time, but was really enamored with 70’s prog rock bands like Yes and ELP, “with a large helping of the Stones and the Beatles.” While in high school, he went to the public library and discovered the records of old blues masters like Son House and Robert Johnson and dedicated much of his playing to learning the blues. He joined the Marines right after high school and landed in California four years later. While in Northern California, Michael began studying Celtic, Middle Eastern, and Indian Classical music - those influences can be heard in much of his solo playing. A self-taught computer programmer, he got a “lucrative offer” to do IT work in Minneapolis and moved there on 2000. Six years later, a job as a technical writer for Plexus brought him to the Fox Cities. He also began playing guitar in Unity The Band at the time. In addition to being a musician, teacher, IT consultant, artist and researcher who is going to school online to become a certified homeopath, Theroux is also an author whose new book, “Meetings With Remarkable Kooks,” will be published very soon. One of his previous books, “Rhyth- mic Formative Forces of Music” is available free at his web site, michaeltheroux.com. In addition to releasing “Snow,” their long-term objectives are straight forward. “We want to keep writing, playing, and performing music together,” Conrad said. “We want to be an inspiration for other musicians to write their own music and share it with others.”   Miss Molly to Release “SNOW” in time for Spring Photo credit to Al Kolbeck
  19. 19. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R11 pointbrewsupply.comLocated at 3038 Village Park Drive, Plover, WI 54467 Exit 153 off of I-39 S| | 1-715-342-9535 | Did you know the word “Bock” is German for Goat? Bock beers ferment great in cool basements February stock up special: Get 10% off any in store purchase over $100. Kick your fermentation into high gear. Point Brew Supply.....where advice is always free! Running the Point Bock Run in March? Come in and ask us how to brew a tasty bock that you can share with family and friends after the big race. Why not? You deserve it. Fas t Shipping • Great Prices • F riendlyService
  20. 20. R12  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // DRACULA BY PATRICK MARES On a Tuesday night, February 2nd L.A. Theaterworks will be bringing a radio play rendition of Brahm Stoker’s Dracula to the Weidner Center. Much like the old-is-new growth in podcast audio fiction, L.A. Theaterworks brings literary audio to millions of listeners. Their productions are broadcast across the English speaking world, and even play daily on the radio in Beijing China. We asked Associate Producer Anna Lyse Erikson what separates a L.A. The- aterworks’ productions from a traditional play. “It’s like being backstage at a radio broadcast,” Erikson said “for instance the sound of Dracula biting someone’s neck is done by an actor taking a wedge of iceberg lettuce and crunching it in his hands, which is kinda fun. There are a lot of sound effects which are done by the other actors, doors opening and closing, lots of things.” She said that actors in their radio plays also address the audience directly. “Rather than scene partners kind of facing each other and sharing the scene with one another,” Erikson said “the audi- ence, being this fourth wall, they see this interaction as the actors are actually facing the crowd and interacting with them as much as with their scene partners.” The live audience adds an additional element to a radio play: visual. There are of course a full set and actors garbed in costume. Behind the action is a screen, where animated drawings by Sean Cawelti, their video designer, help bring the play to life. “There is a set and video projection projected on a screen behind the actors,” Erikson said. “Those are animated draw- ings that move throughout the piece creat- ing a really cool setting for it.” Often the troupe will record one ver- sion of the show for distribution and offer another version tweaked for local audi- ences. Since in this case the recorded tour had been captured prior to this season, the cast has been quite free to customize the showings for their live audiences. This production is a mix of old and new. “We chose Dracula because we wanted to do something that was appealing to popular culture,” Erikson said “and there’s so much being done about zombies and vampires right now.  We choose our tours, sometimes based on their social signifi- cance, and sometimes on their entertain- ment value, in the thought that this would be an entertaining and fun piece for the audiences.” S h e s a i d that while the costumes would be period, or at least an L.A. Theaterworks riff on that style: the animations, drawings of bats and wolves, and things that are very important to the story, are attuned, not to historical accuracy, but more modern sensibilities. While no one is pulling out a cell phone on stage, the company is more interested in presenting a truly creepy experience than historical minutia. The production itself runs 90 minutes with no intermission. “Which means like any video or stage production,” Erikson said “quite a bit had to be cut out of the book. The adaptation by Charles Morey focuses on Dr. Helsing. We discovered a great way of telling the story, because Dr. Van Hels- ing’s journals are really what shape the piece. And in a lot of ways we found that he is really the main character as much as Dracula.” L.A. Theaterworks just celebrated its 40th anniver- sary last year. Their founding producer initially started out with an organization called Artists in Prison. Over the years it changed, evolving into a traditional the- ater company and then transitioning the radio plays they do now. “We started recording plays for radio in the mid 80s,” Erikson said. “There wasn’t really another American company doing that at the time.” Erikson herself has been with the group for five years, managing the casting, artistic hiring, play selections, rights acquisitions, and overall live production for L.A. The- atreworks’ live and in-studio recordings and tours. L.A.’s recent productions have included “In the Heat of the Night,” “The Gradu- ate,” and Jane Austin’s “Pride and Preju- dice,” but Erikson said there’s something special about Bram Stoker’s masterpiece. “With the undead so in the public zeitgeist, we thought that this would be an entertaining and fun piece for the audi- ences of our tour.” Dracula - Brought Back to Life!
  21. 21. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R13 ENTERTAINMENT // SERIOUSLY FUNNY BY C Mikes Chamber Story BY GEORGE HALAS ”Loving you is lonely work. I could use a friend.” For months, Trevor Jarvis sat with this line before approaching Appleton native Hillary Reynolds to help develop the song into a duet.  Now, a year later, Peridot has released “Lonely Work” as their first single with 91.1 The Avenue.  Peridot is a re-imagining of the Hillary Reynolds Band, keeping Reynolds and Jarvis from the HRB lineup along with guitarist Marton Bisits. “Over the last year, Hillary and I had been writing all of this new material together, and it just started to feel different to us,” Jarvis said.  “The process became even more collaborative, my voice started playing a bigger role along with hers, and we reached a point where the music just didn’t fit the band name anymore.  Peri- dot’s music is far more focused on what we feel we’re best at which is folk music driven by strong melodies and substantive lyrics.” Rob Moore, vice-president of program- ing of 91.1 The Avenue, is already a fan. “The response we receive to Hillary and Trevor’s music has always been notewor- thy,” Moore said.  “That’s why we are so excited about Peridot.  Sometimes new art- ists come along who create an immediate bond with the audience because the music is at once both original and engaging.  This is true of Hillary’s recorded music as well as her live performances.  The fact that she comes from our neck of the woods makes it even more special.” Lonely Work is accompanied by a music video with a simple concept, designed to marry with the song itself.   “The music video was filmed among friends, champagne, and a small crew from 21summit Productions in Boston,” Reyn- olds said.  “We hatched the song in Trevor’s apartment and it felt like the right place to tell the story.” Peridot will finish recording their upcoming EP this winter and plan to visit Wisconsin this spring for a concert mark- ing its release. Peridot Releases “LONELY WORK” with 91.1 the Avenue
  22. 22. R14  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // POSTCARD FROM MILWAUKEE BY BLAINE SCHULTZ Sure it would be possible to grab four equally diverse musical acts based in Mil- waukee, but the fact they all have recently released albums demonstrates the ongoing vitality of folks who have been at it for decades.  If the quote/unquote music biz has become as harsh and cold as this Wis- consin winter, check out these releases and thaw your ears. Drawing from Bluegrass, Celtic, folk, Old Timey and all manner of acoustic music, Frogwater is what happens when you dedicate your life to making music. Susan and John Nicholson have been at it since 1997. The back cover image of their recent cd Wide Rivers depicts an ancient Martin acoustic hanging alongside a fiddle, sporting a pair of fedoras.   And that image sums it up. Capable of playing nearly any stringed instrument, the Nicholson’s conjure land- scapes of emotion and hint at stories with their playing. Propulsive jigs come alive like taut spider webs.  This is music from and for the ages. Susan’s bouncing pastoral fiddle is supported by John’s sturdy rhythm guitar. He returns the favor as his sprightly plucking gets pushed by her cascading bowed melodies to the drone of Sheila Larkin’s pump organ. Elsewhere, “The Travelogue Set” conjures Orson Welles’ Harry Lime moving through the streets of Old Vienna. If Frogwater’s music can be described as pre-electricity, then let’s call Trolley post- British Invasion. Since the mid ‘90s the Milwaukee quartet has trafficked in all manner of pop, much of it power.  With Caught in the Darkness they spread their wings. While still retaining that sense of mod brashness, big hooks and fearless jangle, the three songwriters continue to grow.  The wise guy listener might play “guess the influence,” pointing to an Only Ones reference or suggesting the royalties for a certain bridge be addressed to Mr. Arthur Lee. Yet all this does is prove these guys did their homework. The stew they come up with results in an updated vibe utilizing vintage keyboard sounds, Paul Wall and Mike Mike Perotto’s ringing guitars and Terry Hackbarth’s driving bass. Yet the glue that holds it all together is John Phillip’s nuanced drum- ming, setting the mood throughout. The crackerjacks here is the final cut “Take My Love,” a seemingly nice psy- chedelic number that snakes its way down a wormhole, turning itself inside out. Then shedding its skin.This kind of sonic monkey business suggests a meeting where the Zombies and an undamaged Syd Barret might have found audio verity common ground. In this one tune, Trolley leapfrogs over their days a pop hatchlings. Xposed Foreheads, on the other hand weren’t hatched, so much as grown in test tubes. If you were lucky enough to survive the heyday of MTV, welcome to your nightmare. Mark G.E., one-time commander of cable-access television icon Joy Farm, leads Xposed Foreheads’ social satire which points back to the likes of DEVO, Oingo Boingo and Kraftwerk.  The irony here is Joy Farm’s old lack of budget charm has zoomed into the future where this band can record using studio technology and virtual reproduction of keyboards that would have cost a small fortune back in the day. Not that it makes any difference to this quintet of mischief makers. All sacred cows are fair game on Choose To Be Human. Social media, handheld devices, informa- tion at our finger tips? Leave it to these beavers to write a song called “I’m Not Social,” whose lyrics are a laundry list of how young moderns define social. Local veterans Bob Jorin, Kelp Cholfs, Carter Hunnicutt and Andy Stillin form the nucleus of the band. Special guests include ringers James Chance and Blaine Reninger, along with Theresa Ala Mode from Joy Farm. Listen at your own risk and be prepared to think. On Distant Planet Dr. Chow’s Love Medicine writes Chapter Three in the band’s history. Once characterized as “The Rolling Stones fronted by Joe Cocker on ‘shrooms covering Frank Zappa,” these guys prove to be an ageless express of punk/ garage energy. (Like the Trolley cd, this one was also mastered by Neenah native Justin Perkins at his Mystery Room Mastering studio.) Fronted by the antic Frank Chandek, the band is anchored by the rhythm section of drummer Dan Glaser and bassist Joe Polizzi.  The low key fireworks are provided by guitarists Paul “The Fly” Lawson and Brian Wensing, who may offhandedly toss off shards of rockabilly riffage, or a psychedelic light- ning bolt with less than the shrug of a shoulder. With titles like the title cut “61 Chevy,” and “Green Slime,” Chow provides soundtracks to the best B-movies you have never seen.   Postcard From Milwaukee Trolley - Caught in the Darkness (Easter) you can see what her drinking is doing to her... but can you see what it’s doing to you? find hope and help in Al-Anon A l - A n o n / A l a t e e n 1-888-425-2666 www.al-anon.alateen.org Dr. Chow’s Love Medicine – Distant Planet Frogwater  - Wide Rivers (BSM) Xposed Foreheads – Chose to be Human (Internal Combustion)
  23. 23. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R15 ENTERTAINMENT // HOPS & PROPS Proceeds support EAA Air- Venture Museum’s year-round education programming Beverages from around the world accompanied by fine food and music high- light this year’s edition of EAA’s popular “Hops & Props” tasting fundraiser on Saturday, March 5, from 7-10 p.m. at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh. This is one of Wisconsin’s premier events for beer connoisseurs. Proceeds support EAA’s education programs. More than 300 extraordinary beverages are available from micro-breweries and distributors from around the world, along with delicious food and desserts. This year’s food offerings include local Wisconsin favorites from The Machine Shed in Appleton. Hops & Props tickets include entrance to the museum, tasting guide, commemo- rative tasting glass, hors d’oeuvres, and live music throughout the evening. Mary Ann Dilling is the EAA’s Director of Events. “Hops & Props has become an extremely popular event for attendees,” Dilling said “and the food and drink exhibitors alike, with the fun festivities all supporting EAA’s efforts to supply free community programs through the year. EAA can reach more people in the Fox Valley with museum programs and activi- ties through the support of those who join us on this one-of-a-kind evening. It is defi- nitely a fun night, with a greater purpose.” Hops & Props offers a chance to meet master brewers and understand the distin- guishing characteristics of ales, lagers, and hybrid or mixed styles of beers. Attendees can learn about the brewing process and history, and become discerning beverage tasters. In addition, the VIP Dining Experi- ence offers an in-depth, more intimate food and drink sampling experience. This added gala begins at 5:30 p.m. with dinner starting at 6. This year’s event is hosted by Avery Brewing of Boulder, Colorado, and Becket’s Restaurant of Oshkosh. Guests will be educated on the brewing process of Avery’s specialty microbrew beers matched by Becket’s culinary specialties. Hops & Props general admission tickets are $75 each ($65 for EAA mem- bers). Limited tickets remain for the VIP Dining Experience at $125 each ($115 for EAA members). Tickets can be purchased online at eaa.org or at the EAA AirVenture Museum. Attendees must be 21 or older. There are also special hotel rates available that include shuttle transportation. The EAA AirVenture Museum is located just off Interstate 41 at the Highway 44 exit in Oshkosh. The pre- senting sponsor for EAA’s Hops & Props is Festival Foods. About EAA EAA embodies the spirit of aviation through the world’s most engaged commu- nity of aviation enthusiasts. EAA’s 190,000 members and 1,000 local chapters enjoy the fun and camaraderie of sharing their passion for flying, building and restoring recreational aircraft. For more informa- tion on EAA and its programs, call 800-JOIN-EAA (800-564-6322) or go to eaa.org. For continual news updates, connect with www.twitter. com/EAA. Beverages from Around the World Highlight EAA’S HOPS & PROPS Fundraiser on March 5
  24. 24. R16  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // CONCERT WATCH BY JANE SPIETZ Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes have been rockin’ the Jersey Shore music scene since the mid-‘70s. Although band members have come and gone, their horn-backed brand of soul-stirring rock ‘n’ roll, blues, and R & B is still going strong. There is a huge following of diehard Jukes fans that thrives on the energetic, feel-good party atmosphere that comes out at all of their shows. Front man/vocalist “Southside” Johnny Lyon is often referred to as the Godfather of the New Jersey Sound. Jon Bon Jovi has said that Southside was his greatest influ- ence and his reason for singing. Lyon and “Little” Steven Van Zandt co- founded Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes in Asbury Park, New Jersey. The two became fast friends with Bruce Springsteen and the three of them take turns playing in each other’s bands even today. Springsteen wrote a number of Southside Johnny’s best loved songs for him, including “Talk to Me” and “The Fever.” Van Zandt’s com- position, “I Don’t Want To Go Home” is Southside’s signature song. The Jukes released a live 2011 CD Men Without Women: Live 7-2-11, which was recorded at the famed Stone Pony in Asbury Park. It featured covers of Van Zandt’s original 1982 album of the same name that he released with his Disciples of Soul. During the performance record- ing, Little Steven makes a “surprise” guest appearance. Lyon came up with the idea for the band’s first new studio CD of all original material in five years,  SOUL- TIME! (2015), while shopping in a giant superstore. Read on for more about that story. Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes features Southside Johnny Lyon on lead vocals and harmonica, Jeff Kazee on keyboards and vocals, Glenn Alexander on guitar, bassist John Conte, Chris Anderson on trumpet, John Isley on saxophone, Neal Pawley on trombone, and drummer Tom Seguso. The band is currently touring throughout the U.S. and overseas. Southside recently called me from Port Arthur, Texas. Jane Spietz: When you were a child, your parents exposed you early on to blues and jazz, and took you to many concerts. You have said that you thought all parents had that approach. What influence did those early experiences have on you musi- cally? John Lyon: It was great to be in a house full of music. I’d come home to the sounds of Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Count Basie. My parents liked listening to black music. They were fans of Big Joe Turner, T-Bone Walker, Wynonie Harris – all of the blues shouters. I thought all parents did that. My parents were a little strange! (Laughs) It also made us kids aware that there were other cultures. What I took away from it is that it is fun to make music, and not a desperate attempt to make a statement or get a point across. JS: As a teenager, did you foresee that you would someday have a career in music? JL: At the time, I didn’t believe that. Then I met Garry Tallent in high school when we were 15 years old. Garry said that he was going to be a musician. He later became Bruce Springsteen’s bass player. After Garry said that, I became acquainted with Steve Van Zandt, Bruce and some other guys who felt the same way. I got the idea that if they were going to try get into music, I was going to give it a try too. JS: How did you first meet up with Bruce Springsteen? JL: Every day I used to walk over to a club called the Upstage Club in Asbury Park where I lived. Because there was no alcohol served, they were open until 5 AM. So I would stay all night long. Musicians from all over would come here. It was one big jam session, and we’d play blues. A long-haired guy with a gold Les Paul was playing there one day. He was singing a hilarious song about how when he went to Catholic school the nuns taught him the blues. He was amazing. Playing great guitar. I was thinking, ‘who IS this guy?’ Later on I walked up to Bruce to tell him how great I thought it was. We ended up becoming good friends. So Bruce, Steven, the other guys and I worked on learning different types of music and how to play well together. It was like our college. It was a great time. When I was singing onstage, I could actually get girls to look at me! (Laughs) We were paid $15 each. JS: I was interested to learn about the special Monopoly games that you, Steven and Bruce used to play. You even had a ‘riot card’ to represent the1970 Asbury Park race riots and a ‘Chief McCarthy’ go-to-jail-twice card for the Middletown, N.J. police chief who was responsible for the breakup of some of Bruce’s shows back then.  JL: Yeah, we played many games of cutthroat Monopoly. Bruce used to win regularly cuz he would sell us his mom’s homemade cookies for Monopoly money! (Laughs) JS: You all have been members of each other’s bands throughout the years. How do you feel you have influenced each other musically? JL: Bruce, Steven, and I have learned from each other’s records and from per- forming together. We’re always there for each other and have a great time. JS: Jon Bon Jovi said you were his greatest influence from early on, and that you’re his reason for singing. JL: I don’t want the blame for that! (Laughs) Seriously, Jon’s too kind. He’s been a good friend for a long time. He worked with me on my side project, The Poor Fools. We did an acoustic album, Songs From the Barn (2013). Jon always lends me his studio if he’s not using it. He’s spent time on the road with us. Jon’s a great guy. JS: How do you manage to maintain your high energy performances year after year? JL: I always feel at home on stage. It’s natural for me. When the music starts, it’s like turning on a switch. And the best part is when the audience is really getting into it and havin’ fun. It just carries you along and knocks you across the room! JS: Your first new CD of all original material in five years, SOULTIME!, was released in September 2015. I read that the idea for SOULTIME! came to you as you were shopping in a giant superstore. JL: That’s right. I was in the wine and liquor section. Curtis Mayfield’s “Superfly” came over the store speakers. I looked around and I noticed that some of the people around me were really boppin’ to the music. That’s when I decided that it was time to come up with some new music to let people have fun and feel good again. JS: Describe the music of SOULTIME! JL: The idea behind SOULTIME! was to write songs that let people take their minds off their worries and bring joy to them. It represents a return to the great days of soul. It’ll make you want to get up and dance. JS: We are thrilled to have Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes back in Mil- waukee at Turner Hall on March 6. JL: Get ready for a fun, wild night. We’re gonna have a party! Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes Phtoto by Rodolfo Sassano WHAT: Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes WHERE: Turner Hall Ballroom WHEN: 8 PM Sun, March 6, 2016 COST: $29.50 INFO: www.pabsttheater.org/show/ southsidejohnny2016 www.southsidejohnny.com/
  25. 25. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R17 OUTDOORS // ROB ZIMMER BY ROB ZIMMER It may be the middle of winter, but for gardeners, this is the most exciting time of year. New garden and seed catalogs are arriving, and the dreams and fantasies of gardeners everywhere begin to take flower. Gardening conferences, along with home and garden trade shows are in full swing, all preparing us for a year of beauti- ful gardens, lawns and landscapes. To feed the growing fury, plant grow- ers and breeders, along with specialty plant organizations, unveil their selections for 2016 Plants of the Year. Many gardening organizations select plants of different categories to feature throughout the year and promote to gar- deners everywhere. This year’s award winning plants of the year are varied and colorful, unique and unusual, representing some of the best in the gardening world. Here is a look at 2016’s Plants of the Year. Perennial Plant of the Year Each year, the Perennial Plant Asso- ciation selects one perennial variety as its Perennial Plant of the Year. This year, Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ takes the coveted prize. A tall, white variety of anemone that grows 3-4’ high and blooms in late summer and fall, this plant features large, 3 to 4 inch blooms in pure white. Deer and rabbit resistant, great for moist areas in full to part sun, this is a stunning and elegant plant for late season bloom. Hosta of the Year The American Hosta Society has chosen the adorable hosta known as ‘Curly Fries,’ as its Hosta of the Year for 2016. Curly Fries features thin, twisted and rippled bright green leaves that explode outward like fireworks, growing to about 18 inches wide, making it a lively and fun medium sized hosta. Curly Fries will take quite a bit of sun, where its color will become even lighter with stunning golden highlights. Year of the Delphinium The National Garden Bureau also select several featured plants each year. This includes a perennial, annual, edible crop and bulb. The Bureau has designated 2016 the Year of the Delphin- ium, celebrating the towering spires of colorful bloom that make the heirloom stunner a hit with gardeners. Delphiniums come in many shades of blue, making them highly sought- after by gardeners. They grow well in part shade and some varieties may reach 5 to 6 feet in height. Ye a r o f t h e Carrot As its featured edible crop of the year, the National Garden Bureau has selected the colorful carrot. Fun and easy to grow, even for chil- dren, carrots are available in a wider range of sizes and shapes than ever, and in many vibrant colors. That’s right, carrots are about more than just orange. Many heirloom and newer varieties are available in red, purple, yellow, white and blue. Make this the year you dive deeper into growing these nutritious crops at home. Try them in containers, straw bale gardens, raised beds and more. Year of the Begonia The award for Annual of the Year from the National Garden Bureau goes to the colorful and versatile begonia. From brightly colored, jewel-like beauties such as angel wings to the mas- sive, metallic spirals and patterns of Rex begonias, these plants make wonderful additions or specimens in sun or shade. Wisconsin Nursery and Landscape Association selections Here in Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Nursery and Landscape Association has chosen ‘Hot Lips’ Rose Turtlehead as its featured ornamental plant of the year. Growing 2 to 3 feet tall and blooming with unusual, tubular flowers in hot pink, this plant is perfect for summer and fall color. Turtlehead prefers moist soil and some shade. The Association has selected elegant Serbian Spruce as Woody Plant of the Year, for its slender form and cascading boughs. This conifer does well in tough places where it will grow 40 to 60 feet tall at maturity. Herb of the Year Chosen as 2016 Herb of the Year, by the International Herb Association, the many varieties of colorful, delicious pep- pers will be featured all year long. Try growing some new varieties this year and enjoy their beauty and flavors from summer into fall.   Hot Plants for 2016
  26. 26. R18  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 ENTERTAINMENT // WILDWOOD FILM FESTIVAL BY JOSHUA GROVER-DAVID PATTERSON Part 1: From Humble Beginnings… In 1991, Robert Rodriguez scraped together seven thousand dollars, partially by submitting himself to medical testing, and made “El Mariachi,” his first feature.  It went to multiple major film festivals and was picked up by Columbia Pictures, launching a career that continues to this day. In 1993, author Joe Queenan heard about Robert Rodriguez’s film and decided to do him two dollars better, by making a film for $6,998.  The movie was “Twelve Steps to Death,” and it launched exactly zero careers.  It got into a single film fest, the First Tarryton International Film Fes- tival, where it won the Golden Headless Horseman award. Of course, the open secret, detailed in the book “The Unkindest Cut,” was that Queenan threw the festival himself. The story of the Wildwood Film Festi- val - now in its fifteenth year and founded by Craig Knitt, Jason Buss and Tom Thorne - is more similar to Queenan’s story than Rodriguez’s. “Tom [Thorne] and Craig [Knitt] have been friends since childhood and I came into the picture when I acted in a film Craig wrote and directed, called ‘The Hunt,’” Buss said.  “In short, the fest came into being because Craig couldn’t find a fest to play the film.  The fact that [we knew] everyone would like the movie if they could see it, combined with the fact that we lived in the fastest growing area of the state, made us think the fest was an idea whose time had come.” The first Wildwood Film Festival took place in 2001 at The Historic West Theater in Green Bay.  In addition to “The Hunt,” the first festival featured eight other films, including an entry from Rob Schrab, who wrote the Steven Spielberg-produced “Monster House,” and more recently directed multiple episodes of the cult TV show “Community.” It would not be the last time a Hol- lywood name graced the credits of Wild- wood.  Over the years, famous faces that have appeared on the screen at Wildwood include Richard Riehle (the very definition of a That Guy, he’s been in everything from “Office Space” to “Modern Family” to “Bridesmaids”), David H. Lawrence XVII (“Heroes,” “Good Luck Charlie”), William Mapother (“Lost,” “The Mentalist”), and Kim Rhodes (“Supernatural,” “Colony”).   Part 2: Wildwood, Part 2.  And 3.  And 4…  Since that first year, the festival has moved to Appleton, and the number of film sessions has grown – this year there are five of them, including a special Friday night showing of a new feature film called, interestingly enough, “Appleton.” “I first learned about the Wildwood Film Festival about five or six years ago, but I can’t say I remember how.  I know that back then, having worked on a few film projects in the Fox Valley area, I heard about Wildwood and remembered it and was always interested in supporting the fest and seeing if we could create something to (hopefully) take part,” said Greg Cebulski, one of the producers on the project. “Now that we have the opportunity, I’m really proud about being able to come home and share this movie we made with so many of the people there that helped us get it done.” The words “Fox Valley” are quite important when it comes to Wildwood.  The Wildwood Film Festival focuses on Wisconsin filmmakers.  According to the fest’s entry form, “The Wildwood Film Festival is a non-profit event designed to showcase emerging independent films/ filmmakers from Wisconsin.  The pri- mary creative personnel, such as director, producer, [or] screenwriter, should have Wisconsin ties.”  Because of this rule, most of the films being shown every year were made in Wisconsin.  But many have been created in such far-flung locales as California, Ten- nessee, New York, and Sydney, Australia. As for the film “Appleton,” despite its ultra-local name, the movie primarily was shot in and around Greenville, Hortonville and Dale, with some shooting in Appleton, including at Appleton Central High School. While “Appleton” is not the first feature film to screen at Wildwood (that would be “The Hungry Bull,” in 2009) it should be noted that since its inception, Wildwood has primarily shown short films.  While a short film usually is defined as anything with a running time of 60 minutes or under, most films screened at Wildwood run for less than 30 minutes. Moreover, Wildwood has been around long enough to see gigantic shifts in camera and computer technology, and what both of those mean for the life of a short film. Consider this – the first Wildwood Film Festival (2001) predates both You- Tube (2005) and the iPhone (2007).  Fif- teen years ago, most people connected to the internet via phone line, making video downloads and uploads a process that frequently took hours, instead of seconds. These shifts mean that the bar for entry into filmmaking is simultaneously both lower and higher.  In the early days of Wildwood it was possible to know the general skill level of a filmmaker based on whether they were shooting on film or video.  Today, a movie shot and edited on a smartphone can, theoretically, look just as good as a movie shot by professionals on a high end camera. And while fifteen years ago the best way to get your film in front of an audi- ence was to try to get into film festivals, today filmmakers can finish their work and have it uploaded to the world and shared on Twitter and Facebook in a matter of minutes. Of course, there are certain experiences you can only have at a film festival. In 2008, for example, Wildwood screened a short film entitled “Jake’s Choice,” complete with a musical score that was performed live as the film unspooled.  Regardless of how good your TV setup is, that would be difficult to replicate in your living room. Also unique to the film festival experi- ence will be an educational session – the festival’s fourth.  The topic of the work- shop this year will be Filmmaking  101: Getting Started, and it will be hosted at the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel in downtown Appleton at 9 AM the day of the festival – admission is free, check www.wildwood- filmfest.com for further information. Some film festival experiences are a little more universal, however. John Pata is a filmmaker whose work has appeared at Wildwood on multiple occasions.  In his own words, he, “[Works] part-time slinging comic books at House of Heroes in Oshkosh. I used to co-own a screen printing shop, but sold that at the end of 2010 to pursue my passion of film- making. Since then, the plan has been to work just enough to pay my bills, allowing myself more time to focus on the films.”  Pata’s short film “Better Off Undead” appeared at Wildwood in 2008.  He com- pleted a feature, “Dead Weight,” in 2012, which secured distribution.  He then returned to Wildwood in 2014 with his short film “Pity,” which won Best Horror/Thriller.  Asked about the benefits of film festivals, Pata said, “I’ve met a ton of incredible humans due to all our festival experiences, and that’s been the best part, hands down. From screening ‘Better Off Undead,’ I met people who would then be a part of ‘Dead Weight.’ While hitting the festival circuit with ‘Dead Weight,’ I met even more people, (and) quite a few would The Little Festival That Could (Run for Fifteen Years)
  27. 27. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R19 ENTERTAINMENT // WILDWOOD FILM FESTIVAL join the team for ‘Pity.’ I’m sure you can see the pattern here, but there are people I met from ‘Pity’s’ festival run that will be part of our next film. “But, more importantly, I’ve made a ton of great friends from around the world due to the films. It’s pretty insane to think about, but it totally rules.”   Part 3: Wildwood 15 - The Not-So-Final Chapter: Asked whether or not they expected Wildwood to still be going strong after fifteen years, Tom Thorne and Craig Knitt gave similar, yet diverging answers: Knitt: “There’s no way we could have ever anticipated 15 years of the Wildwood Film Festival! We were all fairly confident that we were creating something impor- tant, but we worried many times that our scope might have been too limited. Our audience is quite diverse yet they all seem to appreciate the artistic endeavors of our filmmakers. “Here’s a scary/funny thought...in the early development stages of our festival we actually considered calling the fest ‘Whack- fest’ based on my production company ‘Out of Whack Productions.’ We might have gotten a whole different crowd if that name would have stuck!” Thorne: “15 years?  I certainly did not expect it to make it this far.  After a tiny showing the first year I thought maybe once was enough.  I’m very happy to see that so much good work/talent keeps coming out of every corner of Wisconsin.” Of course, a fifteenth festival means fifteen years of selecting which films to include, a process that can be both fun and difficult. “I wish that I could say that it was an exact science but it is not,” Buss said. “We have always said that if [a film] is shorter, it stands a better chance of being accepted. Though it (is) easier to program shorter films than features, that concept also came out of the realization that when we first started it was the ‘shorts’ that were more enjoyable and better quality because the technology was so different.  Now that the tech cost hurdle has dropped, the only item separating many films now is the quality of the story.  Whether we stay focused on shorts or open it to all lengths of projects is something that will be up for discussion in the future.” Knitt said a variety of factors goes into the choice of films that Wildwood screens. “We look for films that cel- ebrate the Midwestern sensibilities as well as some that challenge those same ideals. We’re always hungry for some short, sweet comedies, but if we get a film that has a nice story, we’ll always try to make room for it,” Knitt said. “We tell folks that when they watch the festival they’ll see some films that will blow their socks off. I’ve heard people say, ‘I can’t believe that was made here in Wisconsin!’ But, we also try to include some pieces that will challenge folks to get out there and make some of their own films. We consider story, acting and production value when films come our way, but also look at the significance of the Wisconsin connection.” Frances Perkins, a lecturer at University of North Texas’ Department of Radio- TV-Film and Journalism, served as both a judge and a participant of Wildwood over the course of several years.  “It has been such a pleasure to watch Wildwood grow over the years,” said Per- kins, who entered Wildwood with her hus- band and collaborator, Troy Perkins.  “Our first screening at Wildwood was in 2006, and we’ve had 6 shorts show over the past 10 years.  Three years I’ve been a judge in the competition.  Students of mine have volunteered and shown their own work, and have always been welcomed into the Wildwood family.” Ultimately, judging is a multi-step pro- cess, with the founders setting the overall schedule of films, and a separate panel of judges voting on which films will ultimately be awarded as the best in their category. Featured genres have ranged from horror to comedy to music videos to documentaries to student films to animation, and just about every style and classification has been represented over the course of fifteen years. Thorne noted, “I’m not as involved as I used to be in the actual selection of films.  Currently, I’m more of a dispute settler; if there is a film or two that we are uncertain if it should play, I am sometimes the decid- ing vote for in or out.  Personally, I like to see short comedies.  The reason we don’t see very many of those is that it’s actually very hard to make a good humorous film.” Filmmakers looking for a challenge, take note – the gauntlet has been thrown.   Part 4:  Coming Soon… Much like the proverbial shark that must always keep moving, Wildwood must both get through the current year and pre- pare for the year(s) to come.  This is a huge and unique challenge as a one-time event, much less as an annual occurrence. This year the original triumvirate has added a couple of new members to the board: Brian Murray and Jim Bork. “Brian Murray was integral in help- ing us achieve our incorporation and our non-profit 501c3 status,” Buss said. “He has supported us with tax and appropriate financial services.  He has obviously been a supporter for a while so he was a natural addition.  He and I have been friends for years. We had become acquainted with Jim Bork when he hosted Wildwood at his business, the Big Picture.  He has been our bookkeeper ever since.  He is very aware of the inner workings of the group as it was, and he was also a very easy and sensible addition.” Thorne offered some thoughts on the Wildwood workload.  “Wildwood to me is like any other social event.  It’s fun to be around people that like sports if you like sports, music if you like music, and movies if you like movies.  It’s kind of like throw- ing a big party every year.  The workload is similar to that of a large wedding.  And when the event is over, we catch our breath and then start all over.” Perkins summed up the hard work the board members face each year – and just why she thinks it’s worth it. “Jason, Tom and Craig are true film lovers, and that passion shows in every- thing they do,” she said. “If they didn’t love it so much, they wouldn’t go through the hard work and pressure it takes to put on a film festival! I especially appreciate the Wisconsin connection that all films must have.  It keeps the local feeling alive and sets Wildwood apart from other festivals in the state.” Since it was Knitt’s films that kicked off fifteen years of Wildwood, it seems fitting to let him have the last word about where he hopes the fest goes in the future.  “The biggest thing we’d like to see is that the festival does more than break even. We’ve struggled a few years, but feel strongly about what we offer creators in our state. We’ve had incredible audiences yet there is no way we’re compensated for the energy and time we all commit to Wildwood. We’re looking at partnerships that will make those efforts pay off. We’d also like to see Wildwood utilized more as an educational opportunity for tomorrow’s filmmakers of all ages.”   Part 5:  The Where’s and the When’s. In a world where the movie theater experience is filled primarily with sequels, remakes, too-long-too-boring dramas and unsubtle (and often unfunny) comedies, The Wildwood Film Festival presents its viewers with a completely unique viewing experience.  Unless you attend a lot of film festivals, chances are good that the movies you’ll see at Wildwood are movies that you’ll never get a chance to see anywhere else. And who knows – perhaps one day you’ll find yourself in a movie theater, see a name go by on the screen, and think – “Hey!  I saw that person’s film at Wild- wood!” The Wildwood Film Festival is playing Friday, February 19 and Saturday, February 20.  The schedule of films and ticket prices are posted at www.wildwoodfilmfest.com.
  28. 28. R20  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 CALENDAR // LIVE MUSIC FEBRUARY 3 TOE KNEE V’S 80’S MILL CREEK APPLETON 7:00 PM FEBRUARY 4 MICHAEL GRABNER DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM OFF WITH THEIR HEADS W/ SPRUCE BRINGSTEEN, THE BISCAYNIES LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:00 PM ME LIKE BEES W/ DUSK MILL CREEK APPLETON 9:00 PM JOHNNY TBIRD AND THE MPS VILLAGE GREEN HOWARD 6:00 PM FEBRUARY 5 SAM LUNA BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:00 PM LOFTLAND W/EDEN CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM THE 151S DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM AARON VORASS DUO GREAT DANE WAUSAU 9:00 PM FROGLEG GUU’S STEVENS POINT 8 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE JACKSON POINT SPORTS GRILL SEYMOUR 9:00 PM COOL WATERS BAND MILL CREEK APPLETON 9:00 PM TWEED FUNK MILWAUKEE ALE HOUSE MILWAUKEE 9:30 PM STAR SIX NINE OTTER STREET BRANDON BASH MENOMINEE PARK OSHKOSH 7:00 PM WILDSIDE SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM EMINENCE SHORT BRANCH NEENAH 10:00 PM BOBBY EVANS BAND WISEGUYS GREENVILLE 9:30 PM REDFISH REMIX LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM CROSSING PATHS ANDUZZIS - HOWARD HOWARD 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 6 ONE HOT MESS ANDUZZIS EAST GREEN BAY GREEN BAY 9:00 PM SONIC CIRCUS BACKSTAGE BAR FOND DU LAC 9:00 PM THE POCKET KINGS BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM KITTY CORONA BRIDGE BAR FREMONT 7:00 PM WILDSIDE C&C TAVERN NEENAH 7:00 PM FROGLEG W/ STARGOYLE CRANKY PAT’S NEENAH 8:00 PM THE KRAUSE FAMILY BAND CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE FAT JOES FOND DU LAC 9:30 PM STAR SIX NINE HEADLINERS NEENAH 9:30 PM BRUCE KOESTNER HEIDEL HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7-10 PM GRAND UNION LEAP INN FREEDOM 9:30 PM RABID AARDVARKS REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 9:00 PM THE BOMB STONE TOAD MENASHA 9:00 PM ANDY GELLES LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM EMINENCE WOUTERS SPORTS BAR LITTLE SUAMICO 9 PM FEBRUARY 7 RODEO DEVILLE LEAP INN FREEDOM 1:00 PM 432’S POWER TRIO MILL CREEK APPLETON 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 10 LATIN JASS WHEELHOUSE KING 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 11 ERIN KREBBS AND JEFF JOHNSTON DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 8:00 PM REVEREND RAVEN VILLAGE GREEN HOWARD 6:00 PM FEBRUARY 12 ONE HOT MESS ANDUZZIS EAST GREEN BAY GREEN BAY 9:00 PM MM VS. CRS BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM BOWSER CRANKY PAT’S NEENAH 8:00 PM BOBBY COVERSTON & JESSICA DEMI CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM SLIDE DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM BIG DOG MURPHY & THE MOB DUKE’S RED LANTERN GREEN BAY 9:30 PM LOCAL H, SATELLITE ECHO, BAD WIG LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:30 PM STAGE HOGGS ACOUSTIC MARITIME BAR APPLETON 9:00 PM POLAR PROJECT - UNPLUGGED MATT’S MILKHOUSE KAUKAUNA 8:00 PM BOXKAR MILL CREEK APPLETON 9:00 PM FROGLEG MINOCQUA BREWING MINOCQUA 8:00 PM NASHVILLE PIPELINE MR GS APPLETON 9:00 PM ADAMS WAY PAYNES POINT NEENAH 6:00 PM MODEL CITIZEN REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 8:00 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM BIG AND TALL SHERRYTOWN STATION NEENAH 9:00 PM DOUBLE DOWN STONE HARBOR STURGEON BAY 9 PM JOE WRAY LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 13 THE COUGARS ANDUZZIS - HOWARD HOWARD 9:00 PM REVEREND RAVEN BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM NO STONE SOUP BRIDGE BAR FREMONT 7:00 PM THE BOMB CAPITOL CENTRE APPLETON 9:00 PM DANA ERLANDSON CHEFUSION LOUNGE GREEN BAY 7:00 PM JIM COLE CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM STAGE HOGGS DAISYS WESTERN SALOON OSHKOSH 9:00 PM ANDREW GELLES BAND DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM ROAD TRIP FAT JOES FOND DU LAC 10:00 PM NASHVILLE PIPELINE FOX HARBOR PUB & GRILL GREEN BAY 9:30 PM THE PRESIDENTS FRATELLOS OSHKOSH 8:00 PM GRAND UNION HEADLINERS NEENAH 9:30 PM BILL STEINERT HEIDEL HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7-10 PM WILDSIDE JUMPERS MARATHON 9:00 PM SPITFIRE RODEO KOUNTRY BAR APPLETON 9:30 PM R P M LEAP INN FREEDOM 10:00 PM CAT 5 MOLE LAKE CASINO CRANDON 8:00 PM BOOMBOXX NEW LONDON LANES NEW LONDON 8:30 PM JOHNNY WAD NUMBNUTS JAMBOREE CECIL 3:00 PM HYDE OCTANE BAR AND GRILL WI RAPIDS 9:00 PM ONE HOT MESS PAYNES POINT NEENAH 5:00 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE POLAR PLUNGE - 7 LAKES CATO 7:00 PM CRANKIN YANKEES REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 9:00 PM BAD HABITZ SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM ADAMS WAY SLUGGERS APPLETON 9:30 PM WILLY PORTER AND CARMEN NICKERSON THRASHER OPERA HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7:30 PM PHIL NORBY LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 14 432’S POWER TRIO MILL CREEK APPLETON 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 18 STEVE ARNOLD DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 19 JAZZ MARKET BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM REDSTAR EXPRESS BLUEGRASS CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM RYAN MEISEL TRIO DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM GGOOLLDD, W/ 2 BANDS TBA LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:30 PM BOXKAR MILWAUKEE ALE HOUSE MILWAUKEE 9:30 PM FBI & THE UNTOUCHABLE HORNS FEBRUARY 2016 Wisconsin’s Arts & Entertainment Paper SC NE E Live Music C A L E N D A R
  29. 29. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R21 Locally Made & Hand-Crafted Every piece of wood has a story to share. Owner and craftsman, Jeff, brings that story to life with skillful hands that shape and sculpt each piece to perfection. Find your story here, at the Fox River Wood Shop, and bring home a locally made masterpiece that lasts a lifetime. FOX RIVER WOOD SHOPCustom Wood Working • Furniture Restoration Handmade Gifts New Location! 2734 Co. Hwy. II, Neenah (2.5 miles west of Hwy. 41 or 1/2 mile east of Hwy. 76) P: (920) 882-8880 E: FoxRiverWoodShop@gmail.com 30 info@FoxBanquets.com www.FoxBanquets.com No Gimmicky Sales Just Sweet Glass At Sweet Prices Featuring Glass pipes directly from the artists, Vaporizers, Hookahs, E-Cigs and E-Juice & much more! Marley’sSmoke Shop Family Owned & Run Now Open in Oshkosh 545 High Avenue (Across from Molly’s) • 920-267-8454 614 W College Ave • Appleton • 920-733-5700
  30. 30. R22  |  SceneNewspaper.com  | February 2016 CALENDAR // LIVE MUSIC ROUTE 15 SPORTS BAR GREENVILLE 7:30 PM MODEL CITIZEN SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM DANA ERLANDSON THE BOTTLE ROOM GREEN BAY 7:00 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE WISEGUYS GREENVILLE 9:30 PM LISTENING PARTY LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 20 JOHNNY WAD ANDUZZIS - HOLMGREN WAY GREEN BAY 9:30 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE ANDUZZIS EAST GB GREEN BAY 9:00 PM RINGS BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM DAVE OLSEN BAND BRIDGE BAR FREMONT 7:00 PM 6 FIGURES CRYSTAL FALLS NEW LONDON 7:00 PM DARA MACLEAN W/ SETH BOYTE CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM THE POCKET KINGS DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM STAR SIX NINE FAT JOES FOND DU LAC 10:00 PM ASK YOUR MOTHER HEADLINERS NEENAH 9:30 PM FRAN STEENO HEIDEL HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7-10 PM WILDSIDE LEAP INN FREEDOM 9:30 PM INDONESIAN JUNK, REV NORB AND THE ONIONS, SCRAP HEAP KINGS LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:30 PM COOKEE...TIMELESS MUSIC MACKINAWS GREEN BAY 7:30-11 PM R P M MENOMINEE PARK OSHKOSH 11:30 AM SPITFIRE RODEO MENOMINEE PARK - Y100 TENT OSHKOSH 12:00 PM GRAND UNION ROCKY AND TARAS NUTHOUSE KAUKAUNA 9:00 PM DIAMOND AND STEEL SLUGGERS APPLETON 9:30 PM STAGE HOGGS STONE TOAD MENASHA 9:00 PM MODEL CITIZEN TANNERS KIMBERLY 8:00 PM EMINENCE THE HILL OMRO 6:00 PM PERT NEAR SANDSTONE THRASHER OPERA HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7:30 PM NASHVILLE PIPELINE WELSCH ALE HOUSE MALONE 8:00 PM THE STANGS LIVE WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 21 432’S POWER TRIO MILL CREEK APPLETON 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 24 OTIS & THE ALLIGATORS REUNION TOUR WHEELHOUSE KING 8:00 PM FEBRUARY 25 CRAIG HAWKINSON DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM GUTTERMOUTH W/ THE CRYPTICS, AVENUES, THE JEFFERTONS LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:00 PM PAUL FILIPOWICZ VILLAGE GREEN HOWARD 6:00 PM FEBRUARY 26 KWT BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM DIG DEEP CRANKY PAT’S NEENAH 8:00 PM REFLECT WORSHIP & CHERIE NORGUAY CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM THE 432S DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM IFDAKAR, CHOCOLATEERS, BEACH PATROL LYRIC ROOM GREEN BAY 8:30 PM DOUBLE DOWN MARITIME BAR APPLETON 9:00 PM GREAT UNKNOWN RADIO BENEFIT MILL CREEK APPLETON 8:00 PM THE DEL RAYS REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 8:00 PM STAGE HOGGS SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM DANA ERLANDSON THE BOTTLE ROOM GREEN BAY 7:00 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE TIMBERLINE RESORT CRIVITZ 9:00 PM JORGENSEND TAGG WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 27 BIG MOUTH ANDUZZIS - HOWARD HOWARD 9:00 PM NASHVILLE PIPELINE ANDUZZIS EAST GB GREEN BAY 9:30 PM TIN SANDWICH BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM GRAYLING PINGEL BRIDGE BAR FREMONT 7:00 PM POUNDING FATHERS CAPITOL CENTRE APPLETON 9:00 PM CORNMEAL W/ TBD CRANKY PAT’S NEENAH 10:00 PM CHARLES WALKER BAND DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM THE PRESIDENTS FOX HARBOR PUB & GRILL GREEN BAY 9:00 PM VIC FERRARI HARLEY DAVIDSON MUSEUM MILWAUKEE 5:30 PM JOHNNY WAD HEADLINERS NEENAH 9:30 PM CAT 5 HORSESHOE BAY GOLF CLUB EGG HARBOR 8:00 PM WILDSIDE IZZYS PUB BERLIN 9:00 PM ASK YOUR MOTHER JACKSON POINT SPORTS GRILL SEYMOUR 9:00 PM CONSULT THE BRIEFCASE JIMMY SEAS GREEN BAY 9:00 PM BAD HABITZ KOUNTRY BAR APPLETON 9:30 PM REPLICA LEAP INN FREEDOM 10:00 PM DANA ERLANDSON MACKINAWS GREEN BAY 7:30 PM BIG AND TALL MARITIME TAVERN APPLETON 9:00 PM RABID AARDVARKS MILWAUKEE ALE HOUSE MILWAUKEE 9:30 PM HYDE MOLE LAKE CASINO CRANDON 8:00 PM BOXKAR REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 9:00 PM CRANKIN YANKEES RIVER RAIL SHIOCTON 8:30 PM ADAMS WAY SARDINE CAN GREEN BA 9:00 PM SONIC CIRCUS SLUGGERS APPLETON 9:30 PM BOOMBOXX STONE TOAD MENASHA 9:00 PM MIXTAPE THE HAWK BAR AND GRILL CRIVITZ 9:00 PM CRYSTAL BOWERSOX THRASHER OPERA HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7:30 PM 6 FIGURES TIMBERLINE RESORT CRIVITZ 9:00 PM STAGE HOGGS WHISTLE INN NICHOLS 9:00 PM JORGENSEND TAGG WORLD OF BEER APPLETON 9:00 PM FEBRUARY 28 ROCKER LEAP INN FREEDOM 2:00 PM 432’S POWER TRIO MILL CREEK APPLETON 8:00 PM MARCH 3 ROB ANTHONY DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM MARCH 4 RED CLOVER 21 GUN ROADHOUSE LEDGEVIEW 9:00 PM JANET PLANET BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM HITS CIMARRON MENASHA 9-1:00 PM THE 151S DÉJÀ VU APPLETON 9:00 PM ROBERT ALLEN JR. BAND MILWAUKEE ALE HOUSE MILWAUKEE 9:30 PM 6 FIGURES SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM STAR SIX NINE THE SHORT BRANCH NEENAH 10:00 PM MARCH 5 REPLICA ANDUZZIS - HOWARD HOWARD 9:30 PM DIAMOND AND STEEL ANDUZZIS EAST GB GREEN BAY 9:00 PM ANDY’S AUTOMATICS BECKETS OSHKOSH 8:30 PM THE HITS BRIDGE BAR FREMONT 7:30 PM ROWDY SHADEHOUSE W/ TBD CRANKY PAT’S NEENAH 10:00 PM FAIRLAND BLUEGRASS CUP O JOY GREEN BAY 7:30 PM LOVE MONKEYS FAT JOES FOND DU LAC 10:00 PM BAD HABITZ GRAVEL PIT SPORTS BAR AND GRILL KIEL 9:00 PM SONIC CIRCUS HEADLINERS NEENAH 9:30 PM BRUCE KOESTNER HEIDEL HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7-10 PM HYDE LEAP INN FREEDOM 9:30 PM RABID AARDVARKS OCTANE BAR AND GRILL WI RAPIDS 9:00 PM NASHVILLE PIPELINE REVS BOWL BAR AND GRILL OSHKOSH 9:00 PM SPITFIRE RODEO RIVER RAIL SHIOCTON 8:30 PM CRANKIN YANKEES SARDINE CAN GREEN BAY 9:00 PM GRAND UNION SLUGGERS APPLETON 9:30 PM THE COUGARS THE BAR LIME KILN ROAD GREEN BAY 9:30 PM THE ALAN KELLY GANG THRASHER OPERA HOUSE GREEN LAKE 7:30 PM ROAD TRIP WOODEYES WINNECONNE 8:00 PM
  31. 31. February 2016 | SceneNewspaper.com | R23 All Performances at 7:30pm Doors open at 6:30pm, featuring musicians from Lawrence University. Season VI Series Sponsors: Artistic Director John Harmon Tickets: $20 Museum Members: $12 Students: $5 Tickets available online or by calling 920-733-4089 THE EVOLUTION OF JAZZ Feb. 18, 2016 Dave Sullivan Quartet BeBop Guitar March 17, 2016 Janet Planet feat. John Harmon Jazz Vocals Sponsored by: April 21, 2016 Dave Bayles Conventional Piano Jazz Trio May 19, 2016 Matt Turner and John Harmon Contemporary/Future BECKY & DAN LUETT February 1 – May 16 Want to know what it would be like to be a dinosaur? Now you can through virtual technology in this new, innovative exhibition! 1331 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh WI 54901 920.236.5799 • oshkoshmuseum.org OSHKOSH PublicMuseum

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