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WAMM North East Regional Workshop York 29 Jan 2020

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Presentations from the WAMM (Wholescape Approach to Marine Management) North East Regional Workshop.

A series of 4 regional workshops is being held in 2020 to build knowledge and expertise within coastal, estuarine and CaBA partnerships across a range of issues including data and evidence, policy and legislation and the benefits of collaborative working. The workshops also provide the opportunity to meet other partnerships and initiate collaboration with potential partners, hear about project case studies and discuss barriers and opportunities to collaborative delivery. You can find out more about the WAMM project at https://www.theriverstrust.org/projects/wamm-wholescape-approach-to-marine-management/

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WAMM North East Regional Workshop York 29 Jan 2020

  1. 1. Wholescape Approach to Marine Management (WAMM) North East Regional Workshop York - 29th January 2020
  2. 2. Index Introduction to WAMM and Workshop Rob Collins Heritage Coast Partnership, its origins and its work Niall Benson The Berwickshire and Northumberland Marine Nature Partnership Nick Brodin The Wear Catchment Partnership – Working together for a healthier River Wear Peter Nailon Yorkshire Marine Nature Partnership Development Project Heather Davison-Smith Tees INCA (Industry Nature Conservation Association) – A key role in the Tees Estuary Philip Roxby Tyne Estuary Partnership Lesley Silvera River Wear Estuary Partnership Stephen Armstrong Framework for Collaborative Working Amy Pryor Data and Evidence – Technical Support Tools Anneka France and Lucy Butler Policy, Legislation and the Regulatory Framework Rob Collins and Amy Pryor Introduction to the WAMM Roadmap Natasha Bradshaw WAMM Project Support Lucy Butler and Natasha Bradshaw
  3. 3. WAMM – York Workshop Wholescape Approach to Marine Management Introduction Rob Collins rob@theriverstrust.org (The Rivers Trust & CaBA Support Team)
  4. 4. WAMM Team
  5. 5. Challenges • Knowledge gaps with respect to Estuarine & Coastal Waters – status, pressures & impacts • Lack of resources; challenge of integrating land, estuarine and coastal waters; need to engage a diverse range of stakeholders • Despite relatively strong regulatory framework (MSFD, Habitats Directive etc.) work is piecemeal; lack of integration
  6. 6. WAMM Objectives • Drive a collaborative, closer working model between Coastal Partnerships and (TRaC-relevant) CaBA Partnerships • Improve integration across terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine and coastal environments, embed a more strategic ‘wholescape’ approach • Improve understanding of the state of estuarine and coastal waters – Article 80
  7. 7. Benefits of Collaboration • Pool expertise, data, resources (get more for less) • Access a wider range of key stakeholders • Secure funds for larger more holistic projects • Maximise environmental, social and economic benefits
  8. 8. Morecambe Bay Pilot Aims: • Drive a collaborative approach across the 4 partnerships, for the longer term; Morecambe Bay Coastal Partnership, 3 CaBA Partnerships (led by Wyre, Lune & South Cumbria RTs) • Improve understanding of the state of coastal and estuarine waters • Improve understanding of the link between freshwater/catchment processes and the Bay
  9. 9. Morecambe Bay Pilot Why Morecambe Bay? • Existing stakeholder engagement strong • Multiple Designations – SAC, SPA, SSSI, Ramsar, Salmon Rivers, BAP Priority Species, critical nursery area – commercial marine species • Heterogeneous range of pressures across the catchment • Proposed new ‘Eden Project’
  10. 10. Morecambe Bay Pilot • Monitoring program that includes riverine and estuarine water quality including microplastics, the impact of septic tanks and diffuse pollution, the health and diversity of the estuarine fish populations, and, community education • Focus on plastics – microplastics in water column, sediment and biota. • Work with Lancaster University and other stakeholders • Plastics workshop (May 2020)
  11. 11. Data & Evidence • Development of a Coastal data explorer to be circulated to relevant partnerships nationwide • Development of at least 3 shared information platforms – capture local datasets, help the participatory process • Support building of knowledge in partnerships; technical aspects, proposals, plans, business cases etc • Workshops, webinars, guidance material and (some) 1-2-1 support
  12. 12. Framework for Collaborative Delivery in the Coastal & Estuarine Environment • Work with Coastal and (TraC relevant) CaBA Partnerships to understand both opportunities and challenges to working together • Develop a model for partnership working within and between CPs and CaBA for the long-term. • Framework will provide a longer-term legacy for the project, providing a roadmap for integrated delivery.
  13. 13. National Knowledge Exchange • National Conference • Workshops • Webinars • 1-2-1 support • Re-energise the CaBA Coastal & Estuarine Working Group
  14. 14. Thanks rob@theriverstrust.org
  15. 15. Heritage Coast Partnership, its origins and its work Niall Benson www.durhamheritagecoast.org Heritage Coast Officer @DurhamCoast
  16. 16. 2010 1992 Before and After
  17. 17. Access and Public Enjoyment Preserve and enhance landscape quality Durham Heritage Coast Objectives Integrated Management Greater Participation Educational Opportunities Nature Conservation
  18. 18. The Partnership: Durham County Council, City of Sunderland Council, Hartlepool Borough Council, Seaham Town Council, Natural England, Environment Agency, Northumbrian Water, National Trust, Durham Wildlife Trust, Groundwork, Ryhope Community Association, Easington Colliery Regeneration Partnership, Horden Regeneration Partnership, Blackhalls Partnership. Management Plan 2018 - 2025 Annual Business Plan – 2019-20
  19. 19. Coast Watch • >200 Watchers signed up • New Durham sign up mechanism - https://www.keepintheknow.co.uk/ • Reduction in anti-social behaviour • Increase in illegal motorcycle access • Northumbria Police – East Sunderland And now to the south Cleveland Police
  20. 20. Beach Care This work continues 90 beach cleans in 2019 • Unofficial Seaham Beach Care Crew • Great British Beach Clean • #dontletgo • #nurdle hunt • #2minutebeachclean • #Refill
  21. 21. We do not exist in isolation…..change is ongoing  Coastal Streams Partnership  The Water Hub  North East Nature Partnership  New technology  Marine Plans  Local Plans  DENE (Discover, Engage, Natural Environment)  SeaScapes Working together
  22. 22. SeaScapes Partnership
  23. 23. Photos R1 L-R: INCA, Heritage Coast Partnership (2); R2 L-R: Sunderland Maritime Heritage, Nic Faulks, Healey Hero A SHARED HERITAGE
  24. 24. Development phase Submit bid to HLF in November, 2019 A scheme of special projects, events and activities 2020 - 2024 Delivery phase Successful application to UK’s Heritage Lottery Fund for £2.9m Secured £2m of Partnership funding
  25. 25. Thank you Any questions? Feel free to contact me with any questions at any time E: Niall.benson@durham.gov.uk T: 03000 268130
  26. 26. The Berwickshire and Northumberland Marine Nature Partnership Nick Brodin WAMM Workshop, York – 29th January 2020
  27. 27. Outline of the presentation •Who we are •Range of interests that we cover •Issues and challenges relevant to wider catchment management
  28. 28. Partnership of 27 organisations with responsibilities for management of inshore marine protected areas Work between Fast Castle Head and the River Tyne Exist to help partners coordinate management of the entire network of marine protected areas and to share information and knowledge
  29. 29. Management Group - Berwick Harbour Commission - Environment Agency - Eyemouth Harbour Trust - Historic England - Marine Management Organisation - Marine Scotland - Maritime & Coastguard Agency - National Trust - National Trust for Scotland - Natural England - North Tyneside Council - North Sunderland Harbour Commission - Northern Lighthouse Board - Northumberland County Council - Northumberland Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authority - Northumbrian Water Ltd - Northumberland Wildlife Trust - Port of Blyth - River Tweed Commission - St Abbs Harbour Trust - Scottish Borders Council - Scottish Environmental Protection Agency - Scottish Natural Heritage - St Abbs and Eyemouth Voluntary Marine Reserve - Trinity House - Warkworth Harbour Commissioner
  30. 30. 1. St Abbs to Fast Castle Head SPA 2. Berwickshire & North Northumberland Coast SAC 3. Tweed Estuary SAC 4. Northumbria Coast SPA 5. Lindisfarne SPA 6. Farne Islands SPA 7. Coquet Island SPA 8. Aln Estuary MCZ 9. Coquet to St Mary’s Island MCZ 10. Northumberland Marine SPA 11. Berwick to St Mary’s MCZ Area also includes the Berwickshire Marine Reserve, three National Nature Reserves, two Ramsar sites and 15 SSSIs
  31. 31. Photo credits: Tom Cadwallender, Paula Lightfoot and Iain Robson
  32. 32. Our activities • Management Scheme • Coordination and knowledge sharing • Identification of gaps in knowledge and delivery • Project development
  33. 33. Issues and challenges relevant to wider catchment management • Diffuse pollution • Litter • Recreational pressures • Development and coastal infrastructure • Mine water discharges • Invasive Non-Native Species • Climate change • Public awareness
  34. 34. Thank You for Your Attention Nick Brodin Project Officer T: 01670 622 651 E: nick.brodin@northumberland.gov.uk www.xbordercurrents.org.uk
  35. 35. PETER NAILON: WRT DIRECTOR WEAR CATCHMENT PARTNERSHIP
  36. 36. WEAR CATCHMENT PARTNERSHIP
  37. 37. WCP BUSINESS PLAN
  38. 38. STORYMAPS • WEB APPLICATION: COMBINES MAPS, NARRATIVE, VIDEOS AND PHOTOGRAPHS • MAP LAYERS CAN BE COMPARED TO SEE AND COLLATE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN DATA SETS • REPOSITORY OF, AND LINKS TO, DATA OVER THE WHOLE WEAR CATCHMENT • VISIBILITY OF SUB-CATCHMENT CHARACTERISTICS, CHALLENGES, ACTIONS TAKEN AND PLANNED • HTTPS://WEAR-RIVERS- TRUST.ORG.UK/STORYMAP
  39. 39. SOURCE TO SEA • HISTORICAL PRESSURES • ABANDONED LEAD MINES • ABANDONED COAL MINES • INDUSTRIAL CONTAMINATION • OLD LANDFILL • CHANNEL MODIFICATIONS • MODERN PRESSURES • WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT • AGRICULTURE • URBAN RUN-OFF • INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL • PLASTICS
  40. 40. • NORTH SEA REGION INTERREG PROJECT • 17 PILOTS ACROSS 5 NATIONS • UK1: INTEGRATED LAND, SURFACE WATER AND GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT • DURHAM UNIVERSITY, NORTHUMBRIAN WATER • ENVIRONMENT AGENCY • HERITAGE COAST PARTNERSHIP • WRT WORKING WITH LOCAL FARMING NETWORKS TO PROMOTE: • BUILD AWARENESS OF MULTIPLE COMMERCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS OF MAXIMISING SOIL ECOLOGY • WHAT HEALTHY SOILS LOOK LIKE • POTENTIAL FOR PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PAYMENTS FOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES EXAMPLES OF PARTNERSHIP DELIVERY:
  41. 41. • NW EUROPE INTERREG PROJECT • 16 PARTNERS ACROSS 5 NATIONS • NORTH PENNINES AONB PARTNERSHIP • AIM TO REDUCE CO2 EMISSIONS & ENHANCE CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF DAMAGED PEATLANDS • UK NE PILOT WRT: • SUPPLY CHAIN BUSINESS MODEL • COMMUNITY BASED PROPAGATION TRIALS • COMMERCIAL SCALE TRIAL • UPLAND FARMING BUSINESS MODEL • MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE OUTPUT MODEL • DIVERSIFICATION INTO SPECIES PRODUCTION • POTENTIAL FOR PUBLIC PAYMENTS FOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES • BLUE CARBON CREDIT SCHEME EXAMPLES OF PARTNERSHIP DELIVERY:
  42. 42. POOLING INFORMATION WITHIN CATCHMENT: COOL WATERS • 4-YEAR PROJECT • WOODLAND TRUST • OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARTNERSHIP DELIVERY • RIPARIAN TREE COVER • 22,500 TREES • ESSENTIALLY OPEN-ENDED • FARMER NETWORK • FISH + MULTIPLE BENEFITS • ALIGNMENT WITH OTHER PROJECTS • AGRICULTURAL PHOSPHATES • LOCAL NFM • SOIL MANAGEMENT & NUTRIENT RETENTION • INNS MAPPING & MANAGEMENT 33 11 22 C r o o kC r o o k D u r h a mD u r h a m To w L a wTo w L a w P e t e r l e eP e t e r l e e S t a n h o p eS t a n h o p e S p e n n y m o o rS p e n n y m o o r L a n c h e s t e rL a n c h e s t e r W o l s i n g h a mW o l s i n g h a m W i t t o n - l e - W e a rW i t t o n - l e - W e a r B i s h o p A u c k l a n dB i s h o p A u c k l a n d C h e s t e r - l e - S r e e tC h e s t e r - l e - S r e e t H o u g h t o n - l e - S p r i n gH o u g h t o n - l e - S p r i n g 0 6 12 18 243 Kilometers / This map is reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office © Crown Copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings. Environment Agency, 100024198, [2018]. Cool Water Project Legend Priority_Area 1 2 3 Priority Areas Date: 03/08/2018 1:250,000Scale:
  43. 43. INNS: REGIONAL AND WHOLE CATCHMENT APPROACH
  44. 44. LUMLEY PARK BURN: LANDSCAPE SCALE PROJECT DEVELOPMENT • ALL CATCHMENT PARTNERS • CROSS BOUNDARY: SUNDERLAND CITY COUNCIL AND DURHAM COUNTY COUNCIL • IMPROVE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE & PUBLIC AWARENESS: • ENHANCED BIODIVERSITY. • BETTER SURFACE WATER GROUNDWATER AND AIR QUALITY • ADAPTED TO CLIMATE CHANGE EXTREMES, REDUCE FLOOD RISK AND IMPACT • LINK WALKING &CYCLING ROUTES TO HERITAGE SITES INTERPRETATION • PROMOTION OF AND ACCESS TO LOCAL FOOD PRODUCE • SCHOOLS AND LOCAL COMMUNITY GROUPS
  45. 45. Yorkshire Marine Nature Partnership Development Project 29th January 2020 Heather Davison-Smith YMNP Development Officer
  46. 46. Yorkshire Marine Nature Partnership Development Project  Funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund until September 2021  Build capacity  Engage with a wide range of organisations and groups  Encourage collaboration, coordination and a more holistic approach to marine/coastal management  Establish a sustainable finance and governance model for the Yorkshire Marine Nature Partnership  Funding cannot be used for statutory work, but can be used to develop a structure for the long-term  MPA management  WFD objectives
  47. 47. Yorkshire’s coastal water quality  Two water bodies: Yorkshire North and Yorkshire South  Both highly modified  Both classed as ‘moderate’  Highly populated and sensitive areas  Three CaBA Partnerships  Esk and Coastal Streams, Yorkshire Derwent, Hull and East Riding  Focus on terrestrial & riverine  Lack of national steer for WFD objectives on coast  Coastal WFD issues have been largely neglected  Bathing Water Partnership – focus on public health  Gap in management of marine environment, fails to link terrestrial and marine ecosystems
  48. 48. How can we bridge this gap?
  49. 49. Opportunities for a more integrated approach to coastal WFD issues A Yorkshire Coastal Catchment Partnership?  Utilise CaBA funding to complement existing partnerships and offer marine/coastal expertise  Put marine water quality back on the regional agenda  Integrate with other aspects of marine monitoring  Risks duplicating current work and there could be sustainability issues, in the long-term Yorkshire Marine Nature Partnership already works with the majority of organisations involved in WFD  Ensure true integration with marine management  Reduces the risk of duplication and makes best use of resources  Has marine/coastal expertise and support  Improves sustainability and potential to link with other regional/national projects  Clarity needed on funding though
  50. 50. How can we make the most of this opportunity?
  51. 51. Working with WAMM  Parallel Development of WAMM and YMNP  Opportunities to share best practice, contacts and ideas  Communication is key  Avoid re-inventing the wheel and make the best use of resources  Nationally advocate for the importance of coastal water quality and the opportunities for linking with  Natural capital/ecosystem services/net gain  Climate change mitigation  Improved marine monitoring  Education & research  Biodiversity enhancements  Restore not just maintain
  52. 52. Collaboration, Collaboration, Collaboration Spring Workshops and Events  11th February: How can the Yorkshire coast benefit from a natural capital approach?  Early March (dates tbc): Knowledge-gap workshops  Early April (date tbc): Project launch event Ideas, opportunities, proposals and connections can be shared at any time!
  53. 53. Thank you Heather.davison- smith@eastriding.gov.uk 01482 391721 / 07814873356
  54. 54. A Key Role in the Tees Estuary Philip Roxby
  55. 55. Founded in 1989 INCA’s aim - to avoid conflict, build trust between industrial developers and conservationists. The INCA model - A member-funded, not for profit-making organisation, supplying ecological advice to its membership. Membership - 31 Businesses; 6 Nature Conservation Organisations; 3 Regulators / LA’s
  56. 56. • Legislative compliance (Control of Major Accident Hazard Regulations 1999 ; Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010) • Development advice and support • Biodiversity projects
  57. 57. 1950’s Teesside – Acute Pollution
  58. 58. 1861 1993
  59. 59. Nature & Industry Successfully Co - exist • A dynamic linked landscape. • An improved river. • A will to improve.
  60. 60. Designation: Special Protection Area (SPA) - Birds Newly adopted expansion 2020
  61. 61. Numbers of some species have increased, e.g. Gadwall, Little Egret, Common Tern, colonisation of Avocet.. Overwintering populations of some species have declined, e.g. Knot, Dunlin, Shelduck.
  62. 62. Little Tern
  63. 63. ‘A New Approach’ The Tees Estuary Partnership • Launched in January 2016. A mandate to develop a common vision for the estuary to meet industry and wildlife needs. • Membership comprising industrial organisations, regulators, local authority, and nature conservation NGOs. • Creative solutions, flexibility and pragmatism from all involved. Working towards a Net Gain for biodiversity, with the help of developing a Habitat Banking process for the estuary to the mutual benefit of wildlife and stakeholders.
  64. 64. Biodiversity: Seal monitoring project • Seal project began in 1989 • Small but important population of Harbour Seal (breeding) & Grey Seal • Project aims to raise the profile of seals in order to conserve them • Healthy seals are indicative of a cleaner environment
  65. 65. It’s behind you!
  66. 66. Important Saltmarsh Species from the Industrial Brinefields of the Tees Estuary Dog’s Tooth Lacanobia suasa (D.&S.) Saltern Ear Amphipoea fucosa (Tutt) Crescent Striped Apamea oblonga (Haw.) Ongoing moth surveys - Climate change indicator.
  67. 67. Thank you for your attention. Hopefully this has helped you to appreciate how INCA helps to achieve balance between the needs of industry and nature conservation in the Tees estuary.
  68. 68. Tyne Estuary Partnership Hellen Hornby Programme Development Manager Groundwork North East and Cumbria.
  69. 69. Develop a Healthy and Vibrant River Tyne Estuary
  70. 70. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Partnership Aims • Develop a Partnership – A strong, strategic, influential partnership invested in long term environmental and economic enhancement of the iconic estuary • Estuary Enhancements – Ecological and biodiversity improvements, meeting WFD* objectives and environmental net gain. Such as bank softening of estuary edges to reduce silting, pollution and improve water quality • Wider Benefits – Realising multiple wider benefits that joined up action can achieve. Such as natural capital gains, health and wellbeing improvements, education, social, cultural and heritage benefits. *Water Framework Directive - DEFRA commitment requiring all rivers to achieve good water quality status by 2027. Royal Quays Marina, North Tyneside
  71. 71. Timeline
  72. 72. Partnership Pledge• The Tyne Estuary Partnership (TEP) now consists over 60 strategic organisation that aspire for long term environmental and economic enhancement of the River Tyne • The TEP responds to the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan; to create connections between existing initiatives and real practical actions • It has a bold vision for developing a healthy and vibrant river estuary and the pledge acknowledges that change cannot be achieved by a few regulatory tweaks, or any single organisation. Solutions are multi-sector and highly interconnected • This Pledge builds on the work of the existing River Catchment partnerships declaration and the TEP Feasibility Study Report which can be found on the Partnership website • All organisations with a vested interest in the Tyne Estuary can sign the Pledge.
  73. 73. Types of Enhancement Bank Re-Profiling • Using existing structures, e.g. disused timber jetties • New retaining structures • Flood relief & habitat creation
  74. 74. Types of Enhancement Greening of Estuary • Use of floating pontoons • Soft edges • Platforms, islands & rafts • Providing habitat • Aesthetically pleasing
  75. 75. Types of Enhancement Species Enhancements • Fish Refuge / Egg-laying • Bird roosting rafts • kittiwake towers • Otter habitats • Mussel and oyster reefs
  76. 76. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wider Benefits Activity Projects: Wider engagement Celebrating heritage Leisure, culture and tourism Education Citizen Science Volunteering Improved access Increased Monitoring (Informal) Code of Conduct Natural Capital gains Health, Wellbeing & Economic Improvement
  77. 77. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Delivering the Partnership Partnership Development - meeting our stakeholders Feasibility study, licencing, design and build requirements Trial sites delivered over next 2 years Monitoring to assess impact and value for money Development of funding bids to facilitate further interventions and to deliver wider benefits Keep in touch with one another: complement and add-value
  78. 78. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Developers Guide
  79. 79. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast
  80. 80. Enhancement/ Bank Typology Matrices Each section of bank was characterised and mapped identifying opportunity sites
  81. 81. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast
  82. 82. Online Interactive Map https://tyneestuary.confers.com/room/presentation?roomid=1#work/121 Opens site opportunities
  83. 83. Summary • Multiple ‘greening’ opportunities along the Tyne • Options can be grouped into a Typology covering: – Engineered vertical hard structures such as quays – Banks with differing composition and habitat – Areas of derelict wet dock – Natural banks • Scale of application wide ranging – opportunities & costs
  84. 84. Thank You
  85. 85. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Hellen Hornby Programme Development Manager Groundwork NE & Cumbria Tel: 01642 815663 Mobile: 07548 223757 https://www.groundwork.org.uk/projects/tyne-estuary-partnership/ Visit the website & sign the pledge: Further Information Thank-you
  86. 86. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast River Wear Estuary Study Stephen Armstrong Groundwork NE & Cumbria
  87. 87. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wear Estuary Study • Introduction • Aims and Objectives • Progress • Get involved
  88. 88. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wear Estuary Study Introduction • Commissioned by the Environment Agency • Looking at Estuary from Weir to Wearmouth • How can we improve the Estuary • Partnership work
  89. 89. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wear Estuary Study Aims and Objectives • Wear Estuary is classed as Moderate and heading for Poor • Detailed study and a new Wear Estuary Partnership • Priority ecological enhancements improve the Estuary • Partnership formation • Report will help move the Wear Estuary towards “Good Ecological Potential” by 2027
  90. 90. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wear Estuary Study Progress • Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation • Investigating landownership • Engaging consultants – survey work, typology, mapping, key locations for enhancements, flood resilience
  91. 91. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Wear Estuary Study Progress • Initial findings : most opportunity in lower Estuary • Suggested sites include: Sunderland Docks, Wearmouth Bridge, Deptford Yard, Cornhill Dock. • Potential enhancements could include:
  92. 92. www.groundwork.org.uk/northeast Next Steps • Stakeholder Engagement Events: January 15 and March. • Develop Vision and Priorities • Strengthen Partnership • Delivery
  93. 93. WAMM Wholescape Approach to Marine Management Regional Workshops Framework For Collaborative Working Amy Pryor
  94. 94. A Simple Spectrum of Collaboration
  95. 95. Minimum effort/risk/reward Might be a meeting, a regular call or a simple exchange of data Very little time spent together e.g. agreeing to share data you have about a common issue such as litter survey data
  96. 96. Increasing effort/risk/reward This could be a dedicated meeting or call to discuss a particular issue. Spending more time together e.g. From our exchange of data, we’ve noticed a gap in knowledge. Parties agree to contact people in their network to find data and agree to share it.
  97. 97. Deepening relationships This could be a series of dedicated meetings or calls actions to deliver key elements to co-deliver something of common interest. Spending regular dedicated time together. E.g. Now we’ve plugged the gap in data, we need to convert this into a GIS so we can interrogate it. We agree to share existing resources to do this together and share findings.
  98. 98. Maximum effort/risk/reward This is where we enter the zone of co design and could include co-location e.g. working together in the same office for slots of time regularly to work out something gritty and understand each others resources and resource needs. Investing larger, regular time together to realise an ambition. E.g. Now we have our GIS, we can see where the real gaps are. We agree to co- create and co-deliver to get the info we need including funding bids.
  99. 99. A Simple Spectrum of Collaboration
  100. 100. The Rivers Trust Data & Evidence Team Technical Support Tools
  101. 101. Data supports collaborative management at every stage
  102. 102. Catchment Data User Group (CDUG) • Multi-sectoral interest group (established 2011) • Co-chaired by The Rivers Trust and Environment Agency • Develop tools and support for evidence-based collaborative catchment management • Webinars & workshops • Annual Catchment Data & Evidence Forum https://catchmentbasedapproach.org/learn/catchment- data-evidence-forum-2019/
  103. 103. More than 150 datasets from: • Government agencies • Government bodies • Research & academia • Citizen science Visualisations & guidance to help interpret complex datasets. More than just open data! Now communities can know as much as government agencies about their catchment! CaBA Data Package
  104. 104. • Partnerships can build on their catchment evidence base: • Monitoring & modelling • Project activity • Water company & corporate • Local authority & planning • Citizen science • & more • Focus on multiple benefits for all stakeholders • Identify shared priorities & opportunities for blended finance Now communities know more than government about how their catchment actually works… Empowering local decision- making
  105. 105. What could be helpful for coastal and estuarine issues?  Collaborative Actions (e.g. WINEP, Highways England, Countryside Stewardship Priorities, Coal Authority)  Strategic planning (e.g. Natural Capital, Social Capital - Climate Just, Multiple Index of Deprivation)  Modelled outputs (e.g. SEPARATE, NEAP-N, Manures Estimates)
  106. 106. https://data.catchmentbasedapproach.org
  107. 107. • Same structure as the desktop package • ArcGIS online group - easier to search for the curated CaBA data • Improved licensing guidance – very important for building trust with data providers • Links to request support from the CaBA technical team • Meta data and data previews • Open data formats and API links CaBA Open Data Portal
  108. 108. Coastal and Estuarine Data Package • 30+ new layers being published • Available within the CaBA Online Data Package • Coastal and Estuarine ArcGIS Online Group • Data from MMO, EA, NE, RSPB, CEFAS, JNCC, Plantlife, National Trust • Online Coastal Data Explorer (in development)
  109. 109. Coastal & Estuarine Datasets Opportunities for collaboration Habitat & Wildlife: (EA Restoration Opportunity Maps; Marine Conservation Zones; RSPB Sustainable shores habitat creation opportunities; Important plant and bird areas) Recreation & Culture: (MMO Beach Activities Model, Heritage Coasts; Coastal Path) Economic: (Shellfish waters, Fisheries spawning areas, Aquaculture data)
  110. 110. Coastal & Estuarine Datasets Issues (WFD classification data, Seabed Litter, Nitrate Vulnerable Zones, Bathing Water Status, EA Trac Waters Fisheries Data) Characteristics (Coastal Design Sea Levels, Coastal Erosion Mapping; Saltmarsh Extents, Coastal physiographic features, Seabed habitats; Neptune coastline campaign) Strategic Planning (Marine Plan Areas, Shoreline Management Plan Areas)
  111. 111. Use the add data buttons to add layers to your map. Search by category or all data Coastal Data Explorer
  112. 112. Coastal Data Explorer
  113. 113. Coastal Data Explorer
  114. 114. Coastal Data Explorer
  115. 115. Datasets filtered to highlight coastal and estuarine issues Coastal Data Explorer
  116. 116. • Use the select tool to highlight records of interest • Export to CSV • Create new layer • View in attribute table Coastal Data Explorer
  117. 117. Data Package and GIS Support Desktop GIS eLearning ArcGIS Online Training Data package webinar Online support videos
  118. 118. Modelling Support and Training SCIMAP FIO Farmscoper Ecosystem Services Mapping • Training in model use • Support with interpretation of outputs • Visualisation templates for sharing outputs
  119. 119. Challenges & Choices • Restoration potential maps for saltmarsh, seagrass & oyster restoration • Published as part of consultation & plans • Promote local discussion
  120. 120. Questions and Suggestions 1. Any coastal or estuarine datasets that are missing which you would like to see included? Do you have data you can share? 2. What are your main coastal and estuarine data needs? 3. Would you be interested in a desktop version of the coastal data package? 4. What spatial scale do you associate with?
  121. 121. Data Sharing and Story Maps
  122. 122. Sharing Data and Evidence – Partnership StoryMaps • Partnership Mapping Portal: one-stop shop for sharing data & evidence • Host data once and re-use in many ways = efficient data management • ArcGIS Online £120 p.a. for charities • Story Map and ArcGIS Online training and templates • Refresher workshops and ‘surgeries’ • Gallery of StoryMaps
  123. 123. https://arcg.is/Tq5bC Partnership Story Maps
  124. 124. Partnership Story Maps
  125. 125. Partnership Story Maps
  126. 126. Partnership Story Maps
  127. 127. Find out more about their action plan prioritisation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v= BvTJgwA- 8vI&feature=youtu.be&t=2706 Partnership Story Maps
  128. 128. Partnership Story Maps
  129. 129. Partnership Story Maps
  130. 130. Partnership Story Maps
  131. 131. Partnership Story Maps
  132. 132. Education Story Maps
  133. 133. Education Tools & GIS Resources • Story Maps used to create themed education resources • Data and online teaching resources • Teacher notes • River Eden & Bristol Avon • Templates can be adapted for other areas https://edenriverstrust.org.uk/secondary -schools/
  134. 134. Questions and Suggestions 1. Are you interested in learning more about Story Maps and partnership sharing portals?
  135. 135. Monitoring and Citizen Science
  136. 136. Surveying and Monitoring • Citizen science guide (H&S, equipment, apps, case studies) • Monitoring planner and guidance • Technical water quality data analysis training • CaBA Monitoring Working Group
  137. 137. Outfall Safari • Outfall ‘safari’ method developed by ZSL • Supported Trent RT • Developed mobile app for data capture • Training volunteers and tech support • Mapped and reported results to water company and Environment Agency • Templates now available for others bit.ly/outfallsafari
  138. 138. Plastics Hub • Creating an online hub for collating data on plastics collected during litter picks • Using live dashboards to analyse and visualise results • Example: http://plastic-free- new-zealand- eaglegis.hub.arcgis.com/
  139. 139. NFM Monitoring Tool
  140. 140. Sign up Stay in the loop Keep up to date with the latest CaBA news & events Explore Learn Discover our online library of resources Discuss Discuss Connect & learn from other organisations https://catchmentbasedapproach.org/
  141. 141. Questions & Suggestions Our support is driven by your needs
  142. 142. Contact Us Lucy Butler lucy.butler@theriverstrust.org Anneka France anneka@theriverstrust.org
  143. 143. WAMM – York Workshop Wholescale Approach to Marine Management Policy, Legislation and the Regulatory Framework Rob Collins and Amy Pryor
  144. 144. Water Framework Directive • One nautical mile – Links catchment to TRaC Waters • Physico-chemical, ecological parameters • Integration with the 11 descriptors of the MSFD • 2nd cycle RBMPs
  145. 145. Nitrates & UWWT Directives (fall under WFD) • Sensitive Areas at risk of eutrophication include Coastal Waters
  146. 146. Bathing Waters Directive Microbial water quality Rural and Urban Sources
  147. 147. Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) • European Marine Sites: Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special Protection Areas (SPAs); • Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs) • Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs)/Areas of Special Scientific Interest (ASSIs); • Marine Components of Ramsar sites; • Marine Nature Reserves (MNRs) Combined these make up a network of inshore and offshore MPAs in UK waters
  148. 148. Fisheries • Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities • Byelaws – e.g. oysters, fish nursery areas • Shellfish Waters Directive – Shellfish water protected areas are areas designated for the protection of shellfish growth and production. Good water quality is important for the production of high quality shellfish.
  149. 149. Marine Plans • Marine planning under MCAA • Seeks to replicate the planning process on land and integrate with it • Applies to all tidal waters including tidal limits of urban estuaries • Applies to any activity within a certain distance of the marine plan area
  150. 150. 25 Year Environment Plan • Thriving Plants & Wildlife • reversing the loss of marine biodiversity and, where practicable, restoring it • increasing the proportion of protected and well-managed seas, and better managing existing protected sites • making sure populations of key species are sustainable with appropriate age structures • ensuring seafloor habitats are productive and sufficiently extensive to support healthy, sustainable ecosystems
  151. 151. Thanks
  152. 152. WAMM Wholescape Approach to Marine Management Regional Workshops Introduction to the WAMM Roadmap Natasha Bradshaw
  153. 153. Framework for Collaborative Delivery Review of Coastal and Catchment Based (CaBA) Partnerships* [*TrAC relevant] Aim: Improve understanding of their capacity, expertise, areas of focus, barriers to and opportunities for delivery, nature of working, governance arrangements, opportunities and challenges to working together. Objective: to help shape an improved model for partnership working within and between Coastal Partnerships (CPs) and for the long-term. Method: • annual reporting data (2018 & 2019) • CPN survey data (2018) • Interviews – Pilot 1-1s – Regional workshop ‘couples’ – National perspectives: Estuaries & Coasts Working Group • Interactive sessions at regional workshops. Output: ‘Framework for collaborative delivery in the coastal and estuarine environment’ will provide a longer-term legacy for the project, providing a roadmap for integrated delivery.
  154. 154. Catchment ‘CaBA’ Partnerships Source: https://catchmentbasedapproach.org/get-involved/ (accessed 12/11/2019)
  155. 155. CaBA Partnerships - evolution
  156. 156. Coastal and Marine Partnerships Bradshaw (2018) updating Stojanovic & Barker (2008)
  157. 157. Coastal Partnerships (2019) Coastal Partnerships Network, December 2019
  158. 158. Coastal Partnerships - evolution
  159. 159. Coastal Partnerships – North East http://www.coastalpartnershipsnetwork.org.uk/north-east-1
  160. 160. Coastal Partnerships – North East Berwickshire & Northumberland Marine Nature Partnership (4) Tyne Estuary Partnership (50) Durham Heritage Coast Partnership (13) Tees Estuary Partnership (46) Humber Nature Partnership (20)
  161. 161. CaBA/Catchment Partnerships – North East Tweed Forum Northumberland Rivers Catchment Partnership Tyne Catchment Partnership Wear Catchment Partnership Tees Catchment Partnership Esk and Coastal Streams Catchment Partnership Yorkshire Derwent Catchment Partnership Hull and East Riding Catchment Partnership Humber Estuary Catchment Partnership Northern Becks Witham Catchment Partnership
  162. 162. Bridging the gap in the overlap for estuaries and coasts Terrestrial Plans National Planning Policy Framework Local Development Framework Marine Plans Marine Policy Statement Coastal/Estuary Partnerships W F D M S F D Catchment Partnerships Umbrella: CaBA Co-ordination & hosts: EA, Rivers Trusts, Wildlife Trusts & others Coastal Partnerships Umbrella: CPN Co-ordination & hosts: Coastal Partnerships, Local Authorities, Universities & others SMP Coastal Groups Regional Flood & Coastal Committees Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authorities Local Nature Partnership Local Enterprise Partnership Marine Protected Areas Issue-focused networks/partnerships Bradshaw et.al. 2020 (Maltby 2009) Terrestrial & Marine Plans are statutory CaPs and CoPs are non-statutory but support statutory requirements e.g. WFD & MSFD
  163. 163. Framework for Collaborative Delivery Review of Coastal and Catchment Based (CaBA) Partnerships* [*TrAC relevant] Aim: Improve understanding of their capacity, expertise, areas of focus, barriers to and opportunities for delivery, nature of working, governance arrangements, opportunities and challenges to working together. Objective: to help shape an improved model for partnership working within and between Coastal Partnerships and Catchment (CaBA) Partnerships for the long- term. Method: • CaBA annual reporting data (2018 & 2019) • CPN survey data (2018) • Interviews – Morecambay Pilot 1-1s – Regional workshop ‘couples’ interviews – National perspectives: Estuaries & Coasts Working Group • Interactive sessions at regional workshops. Output: ‘Framework for collaborative delivery in the coastal and estuarine environment’ will provide a longer-term legacy for the project, providing a roadmap for integrated delivery.
  164. 164. Framework for Collaborative Delivery Review of Coastal and Catchment Based (CaBA) Partnerships* [*TrAC relevant] Aim: Improve understanding of their capacity, expertise, areas of focus, barriers to and opportunities for delivery, nature of working, governance arrangements, opportunities and challenges to working together. Objective: to help shape an improved model for partnership working within and between Coastal Partnerships (CPs) and CaBA for the long-term. Method: • CaBA annual reporting data (2018 & 2019) • CPN survey data (2018) • Interviews – Morecambay Pilot 1-1s – Regional workshop ‘couples’ – National perspectives: Estuaries & Coasts Working Group • Interactive sessions at regional workshops. Output: ‘Roadmap for collaborative delivery in the coastal and estuarine environment’ will provide a longer-term legacy for the project, providing a roadmap for integrated delivery.
  165. 165. Roadmap for Collaborative Delivery Current Status of Collaborative Effort • CaBA & CPN Survey Data • Case Study Insights Collaborative Evolution Improved model for collaborative working between CaBA and Coastal Partnerships, addressing: • Capacity • Expertise • Areas of focus/issues • Barriers and challenges to delivery • Opportunities for delivery • Nature of working • Governance arrangements & leadership. Image sources: (accesed 23.01.2020) https://www.mindtheproduct.com/escape-from-the-feature-roadmap-to-outcome-driven-development/: https://www.usertesting.com/blog/agile-product-roadmap/
  166. 166. Spectrum of Collaboration Challenges, Barriers and Opportunities Capacity Expertise Areas of focus/issues Nature of working Governance arrangements & leadership. Source: Richard Harris 3KQ (January 2020)
  167. 167. Regional Workshops – Interactive Session Spectrum of Collaboration Breakout Session
  168. 168. Four Questions in 40 minutes Q1: Where on the collaboration spectrum does your Catchment/Coastal Partnership currently work most commonly with others? Q2: What are the main challenges and barriers to collaborative working in your experience? Q3: Can you suggest opportunities to improve collaborative working anywhere in the spectrum? Q4: Is there a particular topic/task/project that you would like to see happen (or be considered with partners etc.) in the co-design/co-deliver part of the spectrum?
  169. 169. Spectrum of Collaboration Breakout Session Q1: Where on the spectrum does your Catchment/Coastal Partnership currently work most commonly with others?
  170. 170. Spectrum of Collaboration Breakout Session Q2: What are the main challenges and barriers to collaborative working in your experience? Some prompts: Capacity Expertise Areas of focus/issues Nature of working Governance arrangements & leadership.
  171. 171. Spectrum of Collaboration Breakout Session Q3: Can you suggest opportunities to improve collaborative working anywhere in the spectrum? Some prompts: Capacity Expertise Areas of focus/issues Nature of working Governance arrangements & leadership.
  172. 172. Spectrum of Collaboration Breakout Session Q4: Is there a particular topic/task/project that you would like to see happen (or be considered with partners etc.) in the co-design/co-deliver part of the spectrum? Some prompts: Capacity Expertise Areas of focus/issues Nature of working Governance arrangements & leadership.
  173. 173. Summary Some prompts: Capacity Expertise Areas of focus/issues Nature of working Governance arrangements & leadership.
  174. 174. WAMM Project Support
  175. 175. 191 What support is available? 1. Webinars 2. Workshops 3. 1:1 support (limited) 4. Networking & sharing experience What support is available?
  176. 176. 192 What are your priorities for support? (Select up to 3 answers) A. Partnership development and governance B. Developing collaborative wholescape plans C. Policy and legislative issues D. Bid writing and funding E. Technical data and evidence support F. Networking and information sharing with other partnerships
  177. 177. 193 What are the priority issues for your partnership (in coastal/estuarine waters)? (Select up to 3 answers) A. Nutrients B. Outfalls C. Plastics D. Fisheries and barriers E. Road runoff F. Climate change G. User conflicts H. Other
  178. 178. 194 What technical support would be most helpful? (Select up to 3 answers) A. Coastal data package support B. Evidence based wholescape planning C. ArcGIS Online & StoryMaps D. Citizen Science and monitoring E. Outfall safari training F. Other
  179. 179. 195 What would be your top priority for improving collaboration between catchment and coast to support the wholescape approach? (Select 1 answer) A. Increasing capacity B. Increasing expertise C. Identifying areas of focus/joint issues D. Nature of working E. Governance arrangements and leadership
  180. 180. 196 What would be your top priority for improving collaboration between catchment and coast to support the wholescape approach? (Select 1 answer) A. High level strategic representation (director level, MPs) B. Succession planning (e.g. keeping partnership alive) C. Integrate partnerships (i.e. catchment/estuary/coast/marine) D. Resourcing time and R&D (e.g. business engagement)
  181. 181. 197 Evaluation and support request form Please fill out the evaluation form Our support is guided by your needs Thank - you

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