Cincinnati's approach for a city of the future

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The Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati (MSDGC) is using a watershed-based approach for wet weather management and water quality improvements - approaches that consider existing conditions, leverage additional resources and investments, and develop “factor conditions” to support communities of the future. Focusing on a direct enabled and “inform & influence” strategy, as well as source control, MSD has developed an approach to evaluate sustainable infrastructure and systems opportunities within the service area. The goal is to provide: cost effective water quantity management, water quality improvement, and community enhancements.

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Cincinnati's approach for a city of the future

  1. 1. Communities of the Future:Cincinnati MSD’s Approach to Align Economies, Communities & theEnvironment for maximum benefits Tony Parrott Executive Director MSD of Greater Cincinnati October 4, 2011
  2. 2. MSD Background• Population Served • 850,000 in Hamilton County, Ohio • 220,000 connections• Double Governance • Hamilton County Sewer District • City of Cincinnati
  3. 3. MSD Current Environmental Challenge MSD is among the Top 5 CSO dischargers in the US 3
  4. 4. Phase 1 WWIP and Asset Management Costs Phase 1 Costs (2006$) $200.0 $1,800.0 $180.0 $1,600.0 $160.0 $1,400.0 $140.0Annual Cost (M$) $1,200.0 Total Cost (M$) $120.0 $1,000.0 Annual $100.0 $800.0 Total $80.0 $600.0 $60.0 $40.0 $400.0 $20.0 $200.0 $- $- 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Years
  5. 5. Headline from November 29, 2007March 1, 2010 Broadcast “Sewer Rate Hikes Expected for MSD Customers
  6. 6. MSD Economic Challenges• Maintaining affordability of residential usage• Declining usage per account 260 240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 8
  7. 7. April 7, 2011 9
  8. 8. April 21, 2011Hamilton County property values drop $5B 10
  9. 9. …MSD Opportunity• Making system upgrades to meet federal mandates to reduce CSOs and SSOs• Enabling others to expand customer base through policy guidelines• MSD Bond Rating of A++260240220200180160140120100
  10. 10. Model of COF
  11. 11. Wet Weather Strategy
  12. 12. MSD’s Wet Weather Strategy Hydraulic Grade Line inside sewer 14
  13. 13. Business Case for Wet Weather Strategy • Low cost/gallon removal • Limited opportunity – 4 locations within Lower Mill Creek: installation complete Real Time Control • Estimated reduction of approximately 610 MG (400 MG credited towards 2 BG) • High Capital Cost - Phase 1 Tunnel (7600 ft) to capture 1.6 BGStorage, Conveyance • High O&M Cost: pumping & treating large volume of stormwater & Treatment • Lower cost/gallon removal • Strategic focus on large scale opportunities • Lowers future O&M cost by removing stormwater from pumping & treatment Source Control • Improves water quality and increases natural drainage to Mill Creek 15
  14. 14. Cost Comparison of CSO Strategies High Storage & Treatment Cost, $ Source Control Medium Real Time Controls Low Low Medium High Volume Removal, billion gallons 16
  15. 15. Wet Weather Strategy Determines Capital Portfolio Alternative MSD Sustainable WWIP Current Profile Infrastructure Profile 17
  16. 16. 18
  17. 17. Lick Run CSO #5: MSD’s largest overflow Typical Year flow 1.7 Billion Gallons (modeled) Current number 5,700 accounts customers Land Area 2,720 acres Tunnel Solution $244 Million Sustainable Solution Estimated to reduce by 1 billion gallons 20
  18. 18. MaryLynn Lodor, MSD Environmental Programs ManagerMSDGC Sustainable InfrastructureLick Run Watershed
  19. 19. Lower Mill Creek WatershedSustainable, Watershed-based approach for evaluating opportunities 22
  20. 20. Historical Drainage Lick Run Watershed North 31 miles of natural conveyance to Mill Creek 24
  21. 21. Current Sewer Network Lick Run Watershed 1.7 BG overflow volume 55 miles of combined sewers to CSO 5 25
  22. 22. SWEP – Sustainable Watershed Evaluation 26
  23. 23. Land Use Characteristics
  24. 24. April 19, 2011Guerley Road & SunsetAvenueLick Run Watershed 29
  25. 25. Foreclosed Properties 30
  26. 26. Auditor’s Assessed Valuation - 2009 31
  27. 27. USEPA Areawide Brownfield Phase 1 Site Assessment Grant• Screened over • 2 blocks Clean 300 parcels • Draft Sampling• Characterized Plans: 5 of 7 RECs blocks• Supports • Grant acquisition applications planning 32
  28. 28. Lick Run: Sustainable Infrastructure Alternative Lick Run Strategies 1. Strategic Separation & Restoration 2. Detention 3. Downspout Disconnection 4. Reforestation 33
  29. 29. 34
  30. 30. Early Success Projects St. Francis Ct Apts 35
  31. 31. St. Francis Apartments San Antonio Church Beekman St Stormwater ParkRapid Run Pike
  32. 32. Hydrological &Hydraulic Lick Run WatershedInvestigation Leads 62 catchments 2.1 billion gallons (annual stormwater runoff)to Wet Weather Strategic Storm Separation & DetentionStrategy Downspout Disconnection (50%) Reforestation - 50% of Right-of-Way (88 acres) 50% of Steep Hillsides (231 acres) 37
  33. 33. 38
  34. 34. John Lyons, Strand AssociatonsCost Effective and SustainableWet Weather Solutions 39
  35. 35. Existing Combined Sewer System
  36. 36. Direct Entry Points
  37. 37. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution ~1,800 acre priority drainage area (2,700 acres total)
  38. 38. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution ~70,000 LF of proposed storm sewer 43
  39. 39. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution 44 ~12,500 LF of proposed natural conveyance
  40. 40. Glenway Woods Park • 700’ natural conveyance system enhancment • Two detention ponds. • 3,800 feet of secondary channel • Geomorphic field analysis for evaluation of current conditions and design considerations (scaling, sediment transport, etc) • Scheduled to be constructed in 2012 45
  41. 41. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution 27 Potential detention opportunities 46
  42. 42. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution ~7,200 LF of stormwater conveyance in central corridor 47
  43. 43. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution 48
  44. 44. Sustainable Wet Weather Solution 49
  45. 45. Community Opportunities Plan
  46. 46. Conceptual Channel Conveyance System
  47. 47. Conceptual Profile of ChannelConveyance System
  48. 48. Preliminary Grand Ave Cross Section 53
  49. 49. Preliminary Grand Ave Cross Section 54
  50. 50. Velocities DEPTH VS. VELOCITY EXAMPLES • A rule-of-thumb for ‘safe’wading’ says that the product of velocity in feet/second times depth in feet should be less than 10 for safe wading in streams 5 fps (velocity) * 2 ft (deep) = 10 • A moderate sized person begins to lose stability at 2 fps in 3 ft of water • Swift flowing water can knock a person down in depths of only 6 inches 25- year Storm Event Flows, Velocities, and Depths Channel Velocity Channel Location Flow (cfs) (ft/sec) Depth (ft) Quebec Rd 1,457 4.4 0.3 Grand Ave 1,734 3.4 2.3 Queen City Ave Connection 1,820 3.4 2.1 55
  51. 51. CSO#5Construction Cost Summary 2006 $ Net Present Value Lick Run Strategic Storm $121,908,582 $139,991,247 Separation & Restored Natural System (1.1BG CSO Reduction) Phase I Tunnel Total $245,497,077 $279,622,091 (7600 ln ft Tunnel, Consolidated Sewers, Pump Station, 84 MG EHRT – 1.6BG CSO Reduction) Phase I Tunnel Total Equivalent to $168,779,240 $192,267,687 Lick Run CSO Reduction Volume (1.1BG CSO Reduction)
  52. 52. Markiea Gore, Community DevelopmentLick Run Watershed Partnerships- Agency Partnerships- Master Planning 57
  53. 53. Communities of the Future Advisory Committee• Community Council & Business Association• Chamber of Commerce Agenda 360• Sierra Club • Green Partnership of Greater• Mill Creek Restoration Project Cincinnati• Community Building Institute – Xavier • Cincinnati Preservation University • NRMRL, USEPA• University of Cincinnati • Ohio EPA• Local Initiative for Support Corporations • Port Authority of Greater Cincinnati (LISC) • Cincinnati Park Board• OKI Regional Council of Governments • City & County Departments• US Green Building Council 58
  54. 54. Public Infrastructure Projects as Catalystfor Development• Creates jobs and business revenues for local contractors and tradesmen working on sewer improvement projects;• Promotes the use of small, woman-owned, and minority businesses on sewer improvement projects;• Increases property values in homes that previously experienced chronic sewage backups requiring disclosure to prospective buyers;• Increases property values in areas that previously experienced chronic overflows resulting in poor water quality after rains, odors, and sewer debris; and• Promotes business growth - new business development or existing business expansions - in the MSD service area through the creation of sewer connection credits.
  55. 55. Master Plan Development • • •
  56. 56. Lick Run Community Workshop No. 1 Exit Survey Questions YES NO Do you feel better informed after this meeting than before? 91% 9% Given your understanding at this point, do you support 89% 11% MSDs investment in the alternative to the deep tunnel? Will you attend the next Lick Run Community Design 94% 6% Workshop in October 2011? Will you be interested in taking a Lick Run Watershed Tour? 59% 15% (26% had already taken a Watershed Tour.)
  57. 57. Master Plan Development
  58. 58. Master Plan Development
  59. 59. Master Plan Development
  60. 60. Community Development RolePartner with MSD to help leverage the momentum and investment of the potential sewer improvements projects in the Cincinnati neighborhoods.
  61. 61. Business Growth Assistance• Providing needed support to businesses that may be impacted by the Lick Run Watershed project.• Department offers various incentives for business retention and expansion within the city • ChooseCincy.com • Commercial Property Tax Incentives • Small Business Loans • Job Creation Incentives• Strong neighborhood networks
  62. 62. Short Term vs. Long TermCommunity Development ApproachShort Term Long Term• Identify impacted • Identify and facilitate a variety businesses of economic redevelopment opportunities• Focus on business retention and support assistance • Expand CFAC membership to involve more private sector• Meet with business owners economic and residential to understand their redevelopment experts. concerns and needs. • Expanding community development initiatives to include housing development in the project area.
  63. 63. Taking Action• Informing residents and business owners • Attending open house and community design workshops • Mailings • Questionnaires• Working closely with MSD acquisition and relocation specialists• Creating partnerships with outside agencies to assist our efforts and provide support
  64. 64. Clean Ohio Grant Submittal Ohio Department of Development•City Fire Department•Public Services•Traffic/Engineering•Recreation•Parks Total Project Amount: $1,695,731 Grant Request: $1,279,354 Local Dollars to be Allocated if Awarded: $137,200
  65. 65. St. Francis Ct ApartmentsBioretentionLearning Gardens Two large-scale bioinfiltration basins Approximately 7,000 square feet The bioinfiltration basins capture stormwater runoff from Beekman St Stormwater Park approximately 3 acres, including a parking lot tributary to the basins
  66. 66. John Grosshans, USEPA Region 5Lick Run Watershed Partnerships 71
  67. 67. Lick Run Watershed Partnerships Lick Run Watershed Strategic Integration Plan  “Road map” for partner efforts  Connections to other City, State, and Federal efforts  Mutually supportive goals HUD-DOT-EPA Partnership  HUD and DOT  Other EPA Core Programs
  68. 68. Lick Run Watershed: Integration Strategy
  69. 69. Strategic Integration Plan Goals  Make new connections  Identify the “critical path”  Enhance existing partnerships  Avoid “missed opportunities”  Speak the agency language  Lessons for other watersheds  Pilot project for other cities to follow
  70. 70. Framework Action1. Community Engagement and Vision2. Land Acquisition, Brownfields, and Land Use Plan3. Cincinnati Parks Coordination (Ongoing)4. Regulatory Framework and Land Development Code5. Maintenance Agreements
  71. 71. Highlights Community Engagement  Neighborhood Feedback Loops  Foundation support  University involvement Community Planning and Redevelopment  Future Land Use Plan  Vacant property – Transition Support  Land Development Code (HUD Community Challenge)  Lick Run Watershed Workshops (HUD Community Challenge)  Brownfields Assessment and Clean Up  Green Cincinnati Plan
  72. 72. Lick Run Corridor: Implementation Strategy HUD Planning & Buildings DOT Commerce Transportation Community Federal & Engineering Development City Housing and Community Partnerships FEMA US ACE Economic Parks Development Transportation Development EPA Police and Fire Environmental Quality State Emergency Historic Management Preservation Agency Environmental Protection Agency
  73. 73. Partnership Road Map Commerce Development EPA Environmental Quality HUD Economic Planning & Development Transportation Buildings Environmental DOT Protection Agency Housing and Transportation & Community Historic Engineering Community Development Partnerships Preservation Parks Police and Fire US ACE
  74. 74. Partnership for Sustainable Communities HUD Community Challenge Grant ($2.4M) • Lick Run Watershed Plan • Lower Mill Creek Watershed Plan • Citywide Zoning Ordinance Rewrite • New code to include water-friendly zoning Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) Area Community Development Block Grant Eligible St. Francis Apartments – Rain Garden Pilot • Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Mortgage
  75. 75. Partnership for Sustainable Communities
  76. 76. CDBG Blighted Building Demo(2009 – Present)
  77. 77. St. Francis Apartments - FHA
  78. 78. St. Francis Apartments
  79. 79. Partnership for Sustainable Communities
  80. 80. Partnership for SustainableCommunities
  81. 81. Partnership for Sustainable Communities• Brownfields and Land Revitalization • Green Buildings• Research and Development• Air Quality • Energy • Climate Change• Environmental Justice
  82. 82. Tony Parrott, Executive DirectorSummary 87
  83. 83. The “Getting to Yes” Pipeline • Internal Passage 2 • Political Passage 4 Understanding • Community Support • Federal Policy Involvement Solutions Passage 1 Passage 3Is it the Truth? Is it FAIR to all concerned? Will it build GOODWILL andRotary 4 Way Test BETTER FRIENDSHIPS Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?
  84. 84. MSD Sustainable Infrastructure Investments
  85. 85. Tony Parrott, Executive DirectorWWW.PROJECTGROUNDWORK.ORG MSDGC 513-244-5521 Tony.Parrott@cincinnati-oh.gov MaryLynn LodorWWW.PROJECTGROUNDWORK.ORG MSDGC 513-244-5535 MaryLynn.Lodor@cincinnati-oh.gov Markeia Gore Community Development 513-352-1932 Markiea.Gore@cincinnati-oh.gov John Lyons, PE Strand Associates, Inc. Cincinnati, OH 513-861-5600 John.Lyons@strand.com Jonathan Grosshans, AICP, LEED-AP US EPA – Region 5 Chicago IL 312-353-5617 Grosshans.jon@epa.gov

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