Using large events to leverage urban regeneration: the 2010
FIFA World Cup ™ in the Cape Town Central City
By Andrew Borai...
4. Leave a lasting economic, social and cultural legacy
    5. Enhance business branding and marketing of Cape Town
    6....
Annual Adderley Street Festival Lights event


During the World Cup, the official FIFA World Cup™ Cape Town Fan Fest, cate...
The historic Grand Parade under construction




300 years of history: Greenmarket Square under construction


Well organi...
match days, and to address local fears around congestion and crime associated with the
event.




Visible policing in the ...
Public transport legacy: plan of future IRT routes


The new stadium itself (its precinct alone is 20ha in size) will crea...
The strengthened pedestrian, new mobility transportation system and green space connections along
the Fan Walk between the...
The 2010 FIFA World Cup™, through its stimulus on public spending, is helping to reduce
some of the worst effects of the r...
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Using large events to leverage urban regeneration: the 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ in the Cape Town Central City

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Using large events to leverage urban regeneration: the 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ in the Cape Town Central City

  1. 1. Using large events to leverage urban regeneration: the 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ in the Cape Town Central City By Andrew Boraine Chief Executive of the Cape Town Partnership The new 2010 World Cup Stadium under construction on the Green Point Urban Park Introduction This paper gives a view on how a local urban regeneration organisation working in the city centre of a 2010 Host City, is attempting to utilise the event to maximise development impact and create a lasting legacy. The Cape Town Partnership is a public/private partnership and urban regeneration company established in 1999 to manage, promote and develop the Cape Town Central City. Cape Town has a strong tradition of hosting large events (cycle tours, marathons, carnival, jazz festival, international cricket and rugby) and is one of nine South African Host Cities for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. The Partnership in conjunction with the City of Cape Town has developed a strategy for leveraging urban regeneration and development impact from the World Cup in the Cape Town Central City. The overall aim of the Partnership’s 2010 efforts is getting citizens to feel that they live in a great city, through building confidence, pride, accountability and perspective. Specific goals are to: 1. Enhance citizen participation 2. Organise a unique and authentic Cape Town experience for visitors 3. Contribute to a well-organised and efficient event 1
  2. 2. 4. Leave a lasting economic, social and cultural legacy 5. Enhance business branding and marketing of Cape Town 6. Use 2010 infrastructure preparations to mitigate the effects of global recession and speed recovery Citizen participation Given South Africa’s divided history, the Partnership is looking at ways in which the 2010 World Cup can promote nation building. Currently, support for different sports tends to divide along race and class lines (a majority of South Africans, 54%, rank football as their sport of choice, followed by 15% for rugby and 9% for cricket). This is being done by finding ways to encourage all citizens to get behind the national football team and South African football culture (inclusive of vuvuzelas), regardless of sport preferences. Football culture in South Africa One of the features of the preparations for 2010 FIFA World Cup™ is the great amount of good work being done by public officials and professional consultants that is not being adequately communicated to the public. Under mandate from the City of Cape Town, the Partnership has established a 2010 Central City Partner’s Forum to communicate with all Central City stakeholders. The Partner’s Forum is an opportunity to discuss opportunities for retailers, suppliers, event organisers, cultural performers and advertisers arising from preparations for 2010 around issues such as accommodation, food, travel, tours, entertainment and gifts. This communication channel is enhanced through regular Fan Walk tours from the CBD to the new stadium in Green Point – in particular to develop a walking culture to and from the venue – Capetonians are not big on this. Another way of promoting citizen participation is to imbue traditional events in the Central City with a football ‘flavour’, e.g. the annual Twilight Run, Switching on Festival Lights, Design Indaba and International Jazz Festival, in the build-up to 2010. 2
  3. 3. Annual Adderley Street Festival Lights event During the World Cup, the official FIFA World Cup™ Cape Town Fan Fest, catering for 35 000 people, will operate in the Central City. The City of Cape Town will provide an additional three public viewing areas at decentralised locations. Unique and authentic experience for visitors The Fan Walk will follow the traditional route of the annual Cape Minstrels Carnival, an event stretching back to the era just after the emancipation of slaves in 1834. Fan assembly zones, where fans can meet before a match, will happen in traditional public squares such as the 300-year old Greenmarket Square (currently being upgraded) and fan activation zones are being planned across the Central City in areas such as the popular Upper Long Street entertainment district. The FIFA Fan Fest will take place on the Grand Parade, Cape Town (and South Africa’s) oldest public square, where Nelson Mandela first addressed the world on his release after 27 years in jail. Nelson Mandela addresses the world from the City Hall balcony on the Grand Parade, 1990 (picture: Chris Ledochowski) 3
  4. 4. The historic Grand Parade under construction 300 years of history: Greenmarket Square under construction Well organised and efficient event The Central City is strategically located between the new Green Point Stadium and the main event transport hubs. It is also the location of 47% of available bed space in the metropolitan area. If the Central City is not well organised and managed, it will impact negatively on the ability of Cape Town to successfully host a memorable World Cup. Existing security, cleansing and urban management partnerships, now in place for ten years under the auspices of the Central City Improvement District (CCID), are being strengthened to deliver additional services. The Partnership is also part of the City of Cape Town’s communication effort to explain how access to and from the stadium will be organised on 4
  5. 5. match days, and to address local fears around congestion and crime associated with the event. Visible policing in the Cape Town Central City Leave a lasting legacy The 2010 FIFA World Cup™ legacy is obviously much broader than impact in the Cape Town Central City. For example, there are opportunities to upgrade and improve our national information and communications technologies, satellite and fibre-optic facilities, visitor visa- processing services, and national security plan, amongst others. Total infrastructure spend is estimated at R410bn over five years, with the FIFA World Cup™ providing an estimated R51bn boost to the South African GDP. The 2010 FIFA World Cup™ has unlocked national government expenditure on public infrastructure that would not normally be available to the City of Cape Town. The main legacy for the city will be an upgraded rail network (including an R440m upgraded central Cape Town Station) and the first phase of a new Integrated Rapid Transit (IRT) system including a connection to the Cape Town International Airport (which itself is being expanded). Significant investment has also been made by the City of Cape Town into improved pedestrian environments, better public spaces and dedicated bicycle routes. Key interchanges on the highways connecting the Central City are also being upgraded. 5
  6. 6. Public transport legacy: plan of future IRT routes The new stadium itself (its precinct alone is 20ha in size) will create a massive sports infrastructure legacy on the Green Point Common, lying as it does within a total area of 85ha to be known as the Green Point Urban Park, and which will include improved sports facilities including sports fields and clubs, a 9-hole golf course and the new 12.5ha Green Point Park, a public amenity of major metropolitan significance. Green Point Stadium under construction, with the Central City and Table Mountain in the background 6
  7. 7. The strengthened pedestrian, new mobility transportation system and green space connections along the Fan Walk between the CBD and the Stadium are depicted in a recent artwork by Jackson Nkumando, commissioned by the Partnership, entitled ‘From Mountain to Sea’, currently on show at the Cape Town International Convention Centre. In addition to the substantial infrastructure legacy, the city will benefit from additional (temporary and permanent) jobs, training and skills development, and greater capacity in future to bid for and organise major events. Business branding and marketing Cape Town already has a strong leisure tourism brand, based on its natural attributes and its flora and fauna. In addition, Cape Town has established itself as an event and festival city, a place of music, entertainment and urban culture, as well as a place for meetings, conventions and exhibitions (the Cape Town International Convention Centre hosts 50% of all international events in Africa and 67% of international events in South Africa). However, despite being the second largest economic node in South Africa, Cape Town does not have a strong business brand. The 2010 FIFA World Cup™ is an opportunity to strengthen business connections, for example, through the establishment of a Connect’d Cape Town ‘soft landing service’ for potential investors and entrepreneurs, and a stronger platform for economic promotion. The legacy of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ should not be confined to ‘hard’ infrastructure such as sports facilities and improved public transport, but also ‘softer’ legacies such as improved networks of public/ private cooperation in the city. Recession and recovery In South Africa, 180 000 jobs were lost in the first quarter of 2009, and unemployment rose from 21.9% to 23.5%. Exports are down 55% in value and tax collection is R10 billion behind target. In the Central City, many business sectors are taking strain, including financial services, retailers and tourism. Property developers face a net real interest rate increase, despite the 4% decrease in interest rates over the past year, making many planned projects unviable. 7
  8. 8. The 2010 FIFA World Cup™, through its stimulus on public spending, is helping to reduce some of the worst effects of the recession. In the Cape Town Central City, the Partnership has put forward a strategy to address the effects of the recession and to speed up recovery. This includes: 1. Keep the basics in place. Continue to maintain high standards of urban management (clean, safe, attention to detail) to offset the negative visual impact of ground floor vacancies and to-let signs. The business area must be seen to be cared for, especially during a recession. Strong operational partnerships between the City and CCID are essential to address urban defects. 2. Encourage building owners to ensure that vacant ground-floor spaces are decorated and well-maintained. 3. Enhance communications on development trends, including articles on business and development trends and the launch of new developments, including 2010 public infrastructure. 4. Organise Central City Investment seminars to get best business minds together. 5. Expand impact of CCID job creation opportunities through partnership with the Department of Public Works Extended Public Works Programme, focusing on maintenance of public facilities and management of the public environment. 6. See the crisis as an opportunity and plan now for a future economic upturn, including a 2020 CBD retail strategy, Central City Development Strategy infrastructure capacity study, and key projects such as the expansion of the Convention Centre, CT Station phase two upgrade and the proposed Cape Town Cruise Liner Terminal. 8

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