New Belgium Brewing   Media Presence       2011
Table of ContentsJanuary................................................................................................pa...
January 3, 2011to the Future | Nathanial GronewoldChicago Climate Exchange Closes Nation’s First Cap-And-Trade System but ...
“The point was to get companies familiar with allowances and trading, and how to do that and how to useoffsets and exchang...
Company says it values CCX experienceHugh guesses several companies are in the same situation with regard to their CFIs an...
January 5, 2011Reboot Your Life: TravelBeach vacations can be awesome. But if you want something morememorable—and photos ...
FALL       Where should I go?       Cairns, Australia       Seriously?       Yeah! It’s not all venomous insects and snake...
Ongoing bike carnival raised $331K for nonprofits | Bruce GoldbergJanuary 7, 2011New Belgium Brewing’s Tour de Fat traveli...
inference that his trophies were stolen because he of his “cheap habit” -- as a surprising number of you havedone -- is ab...
January 13, 2011Fat Tire beer mentionedNew Belgium’s Fat Tire beer was mentioned in three different broadcasts on January ...
The Most (and Least) Exciting Beers of 2011 | Zak StamborJanuary 23, 2011Few beers are a better match for the decadent, fa...
January 25, 2011Lloyd AlterOur Readers Respond: Beer In Cans Tastes Just Fine, Thanks To The BPA Coating |My recent post C...
A small amount of Bisphenol A is present in the coating. The FDA does not limit Bisphenol A in       commercially packaged...
Beer: Fat Tire finally rolls into D.C. market | Greg KitsockJanuary 26, 2011New Belgium Brewing Co. announced yesterday th...
Friends of New Belgium and Outside can submit pictures                                                     and videos of t...
January 27, 2011Colorado BusinessNew Belgium Brewing of Fort Collins announced plans to expand its market territory to Vir...
page 1
February 1, 2011Super Bowl Party Upgrade: Barrel-Aged Beers                                                               ...
February 3, 2011Jeff Glor Becomes a Brew MasterJeff Glor shadowed his Beer Shepherd brother Dave Glor, New Belgium, as he ...
On Tuesday, after incessantly checking his weather app, Iggi left work a little early. He had no problem gettingto the tra...
St. Louis teacher taps into brewing success | Evan BennFebruary 10, 2011                                   Thanks to a lit...
The tour will make a stop in St. Louis at 7:30 p.m. May 19 at Forest Park’s World’s Fair Pavilion, with beerproceeds to be...
The 42-foot tall structure, which cost about $4 million to build, sits in the back parking lot of Magic Hat’sbrewery, wher...
Others are taking notice.“It’s something that’s definitely exciting for breweries to look at,” said Mark Wilson, brew mast...
Anheuser-Busch, which makes Budweiser, uses a bio-energy recovery system in 10 of its 12 U.S. breweries toconvert wastewat...
America’s Best Beer Cities 2011 | Evan S. BennFebruary 16, 2011                                           Denver (2 of 7) ...
But hey, in the immortal words of Mad magazine                                                            mascot Alfred E....
“I’ve Always Hated Fat Tire…” New Belgium brewmaster admits!!! | Lew BrysonFebruary 22, 2011Got your attention? Well, it’s...
February 24, 2011Jeremiah McWilliamsNew Belgium Brewing, maker of Fat Tire, plans to expand along eastern seaboard |New Be...
At New Belgium, doing business is about something bigger. Its                                                purpose state...
Create a high involvement culture: Every August, all 385 New Belgium employees gather for a staff retreatoutside in the fo...
page 2
Beyond the Bottom Line | Eric PetersonMarch 1, 2011                                         page
page
page
The Greenest Beer in the U.S.A. | Charles BevierMarch 1, 2011                                                             ...
“Most breweries are taking steps toward conservation. We try to be a market leader.”In 1998, New Belgium was the first bre...
March 2, 2011New Belgium celebrates 20th anniversary                                                    New Belgium Brewin...
March 3, 2011Beer Madness: The panelistsAs always, we received hundreds of responses to our call for applications to our B...
“Jerry Bailey and I started home-brewing in the 1980s, after which he soared to craft beer greatness byfounding the acclai...
They’re adding local flavor by signing deals with local restaurants and retailers to take dining and shoppingbeyond the st...
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook

9,823 views

Published on

An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

Published in: Lifestyle
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
9,823
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

New Belgium Brewing 2011 Clipbook

  1. 1. New Belgium Brewing Media Presence 2011
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary................................................................................................page 3 to 16February............................................................................................... page 17 to 31March...................................................................................................page 32 to 49April......................................................................................................page 50 to 71May........................................................................................................page 72 to 87June......................................................................................................page 88 to 99July.......................................................................................................page 100 to 110August..................................................................................................page 111 to 123September............................................................................................page 124 to 142October.................................................................................................. page 143 to 155November.............................................................................................page 156 to 172December.............................................................................................. page 173 to 193
  3. 3. January 3, 2011to the Future | Nathanial GronewoldChicago Climate Exchange Closes Nation’s First Cap-And-Trade System but Keeps EyeThe nation’s first experiment in carbon emissions cap and trade has come to an end, but its mark on theclimate change industry will be felt for some time to come.The second commitment period for member companies of the Chicago Climate Exchange ended as of Dec. 31,2010, and there will be no new cycle to ring in the new year. Exchange trading in the allowances the systemgenerated, known as Carbon Financial Instruments (CFIs), to meet emission reduction commitments ends, aswell, although CFI generation will continue as a strictly voluntary greenhouse gas emissions offset system.Meanwhile, CCX’s sister institutions, the European Climate Exchange and the Chicago Climate FuturesExchange, will continue as long as there is corporate and state government interest in fighting climate change,even with the failure of cap and trade in the U.S. Congress, CCX officials insist.And former member companies say they have no regrets about participating in the admittedly flawed system.They praise the lessons they learned ahead of the slow spread of state-driven cap-and-trade initiatives fromthe Northeast to California and possibly the West.“We’re glad to have had the experience,” said Jennifer Orgolini, sustainability director at New Belgium BrewingCo., one of the smallest former members. “I don’t regret joining it.”Though celebrated by climate activists at its launch in 2003, CCX became plagued by a flood of creditsfrom offset project generators that collapsed the CFI market, sending exchange prices to a nickel per unit.Highlighting this collapse, many in the U.S. carbon trading community openly questioned the legitimacy ofthe system itself, putting founder Richard Sandor and his team on the defensive at periodic carbon marketconferences held in Washington, D.C., and New York.So when the new parent company IntercontinentalExchange announced the end of mandatory CFI trading bymember companies in October, much of the media reacted with quasi obituaries for CCX itself. Coming as itdid on the heels of failed climate legislation in Congress, a fiasco at international climate change negotiationsin Copenhagen, Denmark, and the collapse in the price for allowances under the Regional Greenhouse GasInitiative (RGGI), CCX’s closure seemed to confirm the death of the very concept of cap and trade itself.Calif. keeps hope aliveBut California’s recent moves toward mandatory emissions trading is breathing new life into the market.RGGI officials are also in talks to reform their system. And CCX officials say that although they’ve closed theircontractually binding trading platform, they aim to leverage their relationship with some of the nation’s largestcompanies to revitalize the voluntary carbon market, while maintaining their dominant position as the largesthost of trading in a variety of environmental commodities. page
  4. 4. “The point was to get companies familiar with allowances and trading, and how to do that and how to useoffsets and exchange them on a platform. And that has all been accomplished,” said Lisa Zelljadt, an analyst atthe carbon market research firm Point Carbon. “So with the advent of mandatory programs like RGGI and nowCalifornia ... the sort of experimental value of CCX as it was is over.”But new participants are still welcome, says Brookly McLaughlin, a CCX spokeswoman.“They can participate through ... the offsets registry,” she said. “The credits will be offset project driven” andwill continue to be called CFIs, McLaughlin added.The central problem hurting mandatory carbon markets globally has been an abundance of allowances at thestart of the programs, usually in the face of weak demand.Prices at the European Union’s Emission Trading System nearly fell through the floor after political haggling ledgovernments to overallocate allowances to influential industries. E.U. allowance prices have recovered sincethe first commitment period but still face downward pressure from a weak economy.Likewise, RGGI allowances are now at their legal price floor after a shale gas boom in Pennsylvania transformedthe energy mix in the 10 Northeastern member states.Transitioning to offsets onlyCarbon market experts say the CFI market suffered the same fate, but for different reasons.Unlike in other systems, CFIs were both allowances and emissions offsets credits. Offset project developerscould generate CFIs in the system even as they faced no obligation to purchase the allowances to meetreduction commitments faced by the 450 member companies.Thus, demand for the allowances was relatively fixed, while supply was seemingly endless. CFIs once traded ashigh as $7.50 per metric ton of CO2-equivalent emissions, but as of last Friday, the exchange trading price wasjust 5 cents, the same price they’ve been at for more than a year.“Quite frankly, the market has pretty much collapsed,” said James Hugh, who handles CCX transactions for theutility PSEG. “There really isn’t all that much to do there.”CCX officials say the picture is skewed because 95 percent of trades occur in so-called over-the-counter (OTC)transactions that don’t show up in spot trading data. OTC market prices have held better in recent months,averaging $3.41 as late as October last year.In fact, the obvious preference for OTC trading is what led IntercontinentalExchange to kill the open exchangeplatform. Member companies were polled prior to the decision, and most reported back that they preferredthat no third commitment period be offered and instead favored the new approach, a transition to just offsets,CCX officials say.Hugh admits that PSEG will likely be left with more CFIs than it needs when the company fulfills its obligationsto CCX and finishes its reporting requirements this year. Member companies were mandated to accomplisha cut of at least 6 percent of their baseline emissions reductions during the second commitment period, butwere free to exceed that target. page
  5. 5. Company says it values CCX experienceHugh guesses several companies are in the same situation with regard to their CFIs and will simply do whatPSEG plans to -- bank them in the hopes that a future cap-and-trade system will accept them.“I would expect that people will probably continue to hold onto them if they have them immediately, becausehonestly, there’s not much else to do with them at this point,” he said. “To the extent that there’s someprogram in the future that recognizes them, people will hold them for that.”Orgolini at New Belgium Brewing, a small craft beer maker based in Fort Collins, Colo., says she likely willhave to turn in all the company’s remaining CFIs when it and other companies report in over the next couplemonths. But she admits that, as one of the smallest CCX members, with a light carbon footprint, her company’strading activity wasn’t all that extensive.“Our emissions were on the scale of just a handful of CFIs,” she said. “For several years, we just held onto ourcredits. We didn’t trade them, and then in later years, as our growth kind of overcame our reductions, weapplied those credits.”But Orgolini insists that her firm is happy to have been a member. The chance to join the nation’s only carbontrading platform back in 2003 was one her environmentally conscious firm couldn’t pass up, she said.Despite the market collapse and lax enthusiasm for continuing the system as is, CCX’s new Atlanta-basedmanagers at IntercontinentalExchange say they consider the experiment a success. CCX’s creators, who havesince moved on to form the advisory service Environmental Financial Products LLC, declined to comment forthis report.CCX says its 450 members achieved reductions of 700 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions over the seven-year life of the cap-and-trade program, 88 percent through direct industrial emission cuts and 12 percentthrough offsetting. Its final estimated average price for the CFI throughout the term comes to $3.26 per metricton, about comparable to other voluntary offsets credits sold in the United States.“It has provided cost-effective and market-based flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions through anexchange platform with price transparency and independently verified reductions,” the company boasted ina release. “CCX facilitated investment in new businesses, technologies and innovative products and helpedcompanies to build the skills and institutions needed to manage climate risks.”And despite its negligible impact on the larger fight against climate change, all in all, the Chicago ClimateExchange was a worthy endeavor, said Zelljadt.“Definitely, the businesses that participated in CCX have gained some valuable experience,” she said.“They dealt with actual emissions units, emissions permits, the things you deal with in an emissions tradingsystem. And that’s very useful.” page
  6. 6. January 5, 2011Reboot Your Life: TravelBeach vacations can be awesome. But if you want something morememorable—and photos that aren’t you writing “dick” on yourbuddy’s back with sunblock—try the following destinations. Wepromise you won’t regret it! (Maxim and its subsidiaries in no wayguarantee that you won’t regret any of these trips.)SPRING Where should I go? Colorado. Seriously? Seriously. But bring some aspirin. So what do I do there? Go on a brewery tour! There are more than 100 breweries in Colorado, and provided you and your buddies can work out a system for choosing a designated driver (“The sober guy drives” is a good bet), there’s no reason not to drink every one of them dry. Try starting in Fort Collins, where you’ll find the likes of the New Belgium Brewing Company, then head down through the brewery-heavy tag team of Boulder and Denver (Denver’s Great Divide is a Maxim favorite), then gradually head southwest to finish the trip in Durango, home to Steamworks, Carver, and many more. So why go in spring? If you feel like some cheap skiing, now’s the time, since a local contest between Loveland, Arapahoe Basin, and others to see which resort can remain open the longest normally results in some huge discounts in both room rates and lift passes. It’s also the least crowded time of year, which means fewer cars on the roads and shorter lines at the bars.SUMMER Where should I go? Tanzania. Seriously? You betcha! Africa might not seem like the first choice for a manly vacation, but trust us, it’s so rugged it’ll make your beard grow stubble. So what do I do there? A whole shedful of awesomeness is what. Start with a safari through Serengeti, home to all the big guys (lions, elephants, etc.) and thousands of other wild animals you can’t even name (or pronounce). Follow this up with a trek through the neighboring Ngorongoro Crater on the way to Mount Kilimanjaro, an iconic mountain that, while possible for a beginner to climb, will still feel like a serious achievement at the 19,321-foot summit. Finish up with a 25-mile boat trip to Zanzibar, a small tropical island surrounded by some of the most beautiful beaches on Earth. So why go in summer? As well as being the dry season (monsoons and safaris mix like Tiger Woods and Vicodin), summer is the time you’re most likely to see all the enormous, toothy animals you can later claim to have fought and bested in single combat. page
  7. 7. FALL Where should I go? Cairns, Australia Seriously? Yeah! It’s not all venomous insects and snakes in Oz (a lot of the fish are venomous, too). So what do I do there? You, friend, go on the road trip of a lifetime. The Savannah Way, joining Cairns in Tropical North Queensland to the west coast town of Broome, is 2,300 miles of hard-driving 4WD heaven, taking you through 15 national parks, world-renowned fishing spots like Borroloola and the Sir Edward Pellew Islands, and sweltering outback trails. You’ll also traverse a whole load of rivers and gorges while generally being more manly than a gorilla wearing Tom Selleck’s chest hair as a mustache. So why go in fall? As with Tanzania, the dry season is the time to go. It’s a pretty remote route in places, and you don’t want your car to sink into three feet of mud while waiting two weeks for someone to drive past and tow you out.WINTER Where should I go? Greenland Seriously? Just kidding! Actually, we’re not. We really are suggesting Greenland. Stick with us; we’ll explain. We’ve steered you right so far, haven’t we? So what do I do there? You will enjoy the spectacular aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights. Huge, surreal, multicolored light storms caused by electrically charged solar particles dropping into Earth’s atmosphere with the frequency of rufies into cocktails at a pro athlete’s birthday party, these will blow your fricking mind. Just tilt your head back and gasp as the sky turns every neon shade of green and yellow going, swirling around your head like a, well, a big swirly thing. It’s like every single day of Steven Tyler’s life in the ’70s! So why go in winter? Because the best time to see it, funnily enough, is when the sky is very dark, which, generally speaking, is in the winter. If you go in summer, it’s daylight almost 24 hours a day, which means you’re in Greenland for no reason whatsoever. This is not a good thing. page
  8. 8. Ongoing bike carnival raised $331K for nonprofits | Bruce GoldbergJanuary 7, 2011New Belgium Brewing’s Tour de Fat traveling bicycle carnival raised $331,428 in 2012, including $33,000 at itsDenver event and $52,260 at its hometown Fort Collins stop. In Denver, Bike Denver and The Denver Cruiserswere the nonprofit beneficiaries. Tour de Fat is free to attend; money raised from the sale of New Belgiumbeer and merchandise supports nonprofits involved with bicycle advocacy and environmental stewardship.Who will win a men’s major title in 2011 besides Nadal and Federer? | Jon WertheimJanuary 12, 2011You predicted someone other than Roger or Rafa would win a Grand Slam this year. When does thathappen? And is there anyone currently (or in the future) who could match Roger’s five consecutive wins attwo different events? Do you see anyone matching that ... or winning five consecutive at even one GrandSlam?--Marina, DallasNow that Federer’s streak of 23 consecutive Grand Slam semifinal appearances has been snapped, here’sthe most ridiculous tennis record going: Since February 2005, only two of the 23 majors have been won byplayers other than Federer and Nadal. So, basically, anyone ranked third and lower is a dark horse. But I havea sneaking feeling we’re due for a new winner: Djokovic, Soderling, Murray, a rejuvenated Del Potro who hasboth his wrist and his head in working order. Stay tuned.As for five consecutive wins at two different events, sure. At two different Slams? No. That’s an amazing record-- thanks, Marina, for bring it up -- that, like so many of Federer’s achievements, never got the publicity itdeserved. He won the U.S. Open from 2004-08 and Wimbledon from 2003-07. All tennis tournaments are “winor go home.” One twisted ankle, one bad seafood dish the night before, one lapse in focus, one day catching ahot server who dials in 40 aces ... and the streak is over. Apart from the sheer volume of Federer’s titles, I’d addthat the concentration makes them more impressive still.Pete Sampras is an idiot for putting trophies in public storage. I’m not being gleeful because the loss isclearly tragic. Just saying that his cheap habit came back to haunt him.--Suresh Rastogi, San FranciscoWhat about this: the trophies are simply “things” and he was motivated by something deeper. Hence he didn’tfeel the need to turn his den into a shrine to himself. There’s a lot here we don’t know. Drawing a natural page
  9. 9. inference that his trophies were stolen because he of his “cheap habit” -- as a surprising number of you havedone -- is absurd. I’d add, too, that a time when athletes are selling their trophies to pay debts (see: AllenIverson) there’s something perversely refreshing about an athlete who simply finds an ancillary location for hishardware.Having recently gotten married, I know why Pete Sampras’ trophies were in storage. That’s where my FatTire neon beer sign went too. Something about it not going with the furniture?! Or not being stylish? Thisis Fat Tire Beer we’re talking about! It goes with anything! Denis Leary has a bit where he talks about wivesredecorating and he says, “I’ve been over to Wayne Gretzky’s house. The man won 5 MVPs. You know wherehis trophies are? In the garage!”--Chuck Partea, Boulder, Colo.The lovely Mrs. Partea could not be reached for comment. I’m surprised: usually neon beer signs are essentialelements in feng shui.entirely.Just wanted to say that I had the pleasure of meeting Venus Williams in Cayman recently while she wasdoing a book signing at our local Books Books. Can I say that this is the first professional tennis player thatI have ever met and for all that is said about the Williams sisters, meeting Venus has to be one of the mostrewarding experiences of my life. She was gracious, funny, captivating, absolutely stunning, genteel and justa very warm and humble person. Everyone who went to the book signing had praises for how she interactedwith the audience. I got a picture to show my grandkids later on in life when I can tell them that I met QueenVee. Long may she continue to play tennis. And the book is great as well. I will most certainly be giving theyounger members of my family a copy for Christmas.--Karen, Cayman IslandsQueen Vee, indeed. I’ve been debating whether to retell this story because doing so sort of the corrupts theeffect. But here goes. As some of you know, I’m teaching a non-fiction writing course at a nearby college. Iwanted the students to experience interviewing a “celebrity” and put out some feelers. One the fastest andmost enthusiastic responses came from Venus Williams. This was a mild surprise. I think we’ve always had arespectful relationship, but there are certainly subjects I’m closer to just as I’m sure there are media memberswith whom she has firmer ties. Also, it’s not as though her free time is abundant. Regardless, she was not onlyhappy to do it, but there were no conditions. No request for payment. No questions declared off limits. Noexpectation that I’d do what I’m doing now and write about it.We did this via Skype and at the appointed time -- literally to the minute -- Venus pops up on my screen. She’sat home in Florida, no handlers and moderators in sight. And she killed. She was thoughtful, she was charming,she answered every question thrown her way. Barring a short interval when her dog caused a commotion, shewas totally present. Imagine being 19 years old, summoning the courage to ask a question to someone you’veonly seen on TV -- and having her validate your questions with a considered, eloquent response. By the end, Ifelt that I needed to tell the students, “Fair warning: sadly not every interview will quite this well.” We’ve saidthis before, but it’s easy to be endearing when there’s a pre-arranged press conference and the bright lightsare on. Doing so in a spontaneous way, when you have little to gain from the situation, is something else page
  10. 10. January 13, 2011Fat Tire beer mentionedNew Belgium’s Fat Tire beer was mentioned in three different broadcasts on January 13 on the FoxSports Network (at 9:30, 10:30 and 11 a.m.).No video available.The Most (and Least) Exciting Beers of 2011 | Evan S. BennJanuary 19, 2011What you can look forward to drinking in the new year, from regional craft ales to the first collaborative bottlebrewed entirely by women. And one dud you should absolutely avoid.Number 3 of 7 New Belgium Le Terroir The experimental Lips of Faith series from Colorado’s New Belgium has produced some eyebrow-raising beers, like Vrienden, brewed with hibiscus and sautéed endive. But it’s also responsible for some true gems, like La Folie, a sour brown ale. Le Terroir, which borrows a term from French wine meaning “of the Earth,” promises to fit in the latter category. A dry-hopped sour ale aged in wooden barrels, Le Terroir has won over beer judges in the past, but until now it’s never been released in bottles available to the general public. That will all change sometime before March. page 10
  11. 11. The Most (and Least) Exciting Beers of 2011 | Zak StamborJanuary 23, 2011Few beers are a better match for the decadent, fatty foods we eat in winter than a Flanders red ale and itsclose, often indistinguishable, cousin oud bruin (old brown).That’s because the two styles are sour and acidic, with sharp, fruity notes that often bring to mind blackcherries, raisins and prunes, along with hints of oak and vanilla. The beers’ tartness complements the bold,savory flavors of a dish like pork roulade or the richness of a flourless chocolate cake, says Lauren Salazar,sensory specialist at New Belgium Brewing Co., which produces La Folie, a Flanders red that features cherryand sour apple notes with earthy undertones.“The beer’s acidity can cut through just about anything, and its complexity makes it work well with just aboutanything rich,” she says.The flavors of the two styles stem from the unusual bacteria used to produce the beers, such as Lactobacillus(a species used to produce yogurt and cheese), Acetobacter (used to produce vinegar), and the wild yeaststrain Brettanomyces (which produces barnyard, horse blanket or spicelike notes).Not surprisingly, the beers originate from Belgium’s Flanders region, which is in the country’s northern half.Flanders red ales, which stem from West Flanders, are reddish-brown beers aged up to two years before beingbottled, usually after being blended with an unaged beer to balance the wood-aged brew’s dry, astringentqualities. The rarer oud bruin style originated in East Flanders. The deep copper to brown beers often featurevinegarlike notes. They also often are blended before bottling.Because the beers are aged for years, they’re expensive to produce, says Salazar. That’s why New Belgiumnamed its beer La Folie, which translates to insanity or foolery.“Making these beers is an exercise in foolishness,” she says. “But we don’t care.”Try ‘emThe next bottling of La Folie will be released in a few weeks. Also, look for these Belgians:Rodenbach Grand Cru: Dark red with an earthy, yet sweet, cherry candylike nose. The flavor melds tart cherryflavors with sweet, balsamic vinegarlike notes and a hint of oak.Verhaeghe Duchesse de Bourgogne: Mahogany-colored with an aroma reminiscent of dark fruits, along withbread and caramel. Flavors of plums, cherries and figs, along with hints of caramel, vanilla and oak.Van Steenberge Monk’s Cafe: A dark ruby-hued oud bruin with a tart, vinegarlike nose. Features hints of goldenraisins, sour cherries and vinegar. page 11
  12. 12. January 25, 2011Lloyd AlterOur Readers Respond: Beer In Cans Tastes Just Fine, Thanks To The BPA Coating |My recent post Celebrating 76 Years of a DisposableCulture and Lousy Beer sparked some debate, notabout the disposable can vs refillable bottle as I mighthave hoped, but about whether beer in cans is lousy ornot.Many readers thought that beer in cans tastes just fine,and one pointed me to an article explaining why: thecans are lined with epoxy made with Bisphenol A.The article, in Chow.com, notes that micro-breweriesare beginning to can their beer, thanks to changes incanning technology that make it affordable for smallerbreweries. And why doesn’t the beer have that metallictaste? That’s because aluminum beverage cans--whether Fat Tire, Budweiser, or Mountain Dew--are lined with a thin, food-grade polymer coating, which means the beer never touches metal. (The coating does contain BPA, but according to New Belgium’s Tinkerer blog the amount is minuscule.)Following that link, New Belgium claims: According to the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., the amount of BPA migrating from can coatings would result in the consumption of less than 0.105 micrograms (0.000105 milligrams) per kilogram body weight per day. This level is more than 475 times lower than the maximum acceptable or “reference” dose for BPA of 0.05 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day, which was determined to be the safe life-time exposure dose by the USEPA in 1993.So the world of the plastics industry and a 1993 standard are good enough for them. They also write: We looked into the matter thoroughly. What became apparent is that there are no cans whose lining does not contain BPA. The industry is actively looking for alternatives, but as yet, none exist. We still believe the benefits of cans outweigh the potential risk of the liners because the anxiety surrounding BPA seems to have far outstripped the science.But there is an alternative: the refillable bottle.The cans are made by the Ball Corporation, who also make canning products that have BPA epoxy in their lids,and get away with it by saying: page 12
  13. 13. A small amount of Bisphenol A is present in the coating. The FDA does not limit Bisphenol A in commercially packaged foods, and is aligned with the international scientific community’s position that a small amount of Bisphenol A in contact with “canned foods” is not a health concern for the general public.The science on BPA is controversial, and research is ongoing. So I am not saying that some of the effects ofdrinking beer, such as becoming stupid and depressed, or getting fat, or growing man boobs is due to the BPAlinings rather than the beer itself, but it surprises me that people who wouldn’t touch a polycarbonate bottlewould happily down a can of beer when there is a perfectly good alternative.Other readers disagreed about whether you could refill bottles. Joe thought I was dreaming: You are missing several key points. First, you cannot legally take a bottle and re-fill it. You can’t take a bottle back to the brewery, sell it back, and get a fresh bottle. The glass has to be recycled.This is in fact not true; it is perfectly legal and is done in the states by some small breweries. According to theContainer Recycling Institute, they have 3% of the market. In Massachusetts, they have 16% of the market,thanks to deposit legislation.TreeHugger John Laumer notes that it is all about business: Refilling makes economic and environmental sense when the brewery is withing 100 miles of it’s market. Beyond that, the energy inputs from returning bottles to the bottling plant overcome the savings from not having to melt new glass or even cull glass. Plastic and aluminum allowed conglomerates to commoditize brands an optimise profits. Nothing to do with quality of the brew.And finally, Jon made a very good point: It’s a lot more resource efficient to drink your beer as a draft, in a pub. More sociable too. And they generally give it to you in a reusable glass.It doesn’t make sense for anyone to take their drinking glasses or pots and pans and melt them down andrecast them after every use; we put them in the dishwasher. Neither does it make any sense to melt downand recast a can or bottle every use, it is just trading energy for convenience. If we are ever going to be a zerowaste society, we are going to have to accept that little bit of inconvenience. page 1
  14. 14. Beer: Fat Tire finally rolls into D.C. market | Greg KitsockJanuary 26, 2011New Belgium Brewing Co. announced yesterday that its Fat Tire Amber Ale --perhaps the most requested brand that’s not currently sold in D.C. -- will finallybecome available in the District, Maryland and Virginia in September.New Belgium -- the third largest craft brewer in the United States after BostonBeer Co. and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. -- has yet to determine who willdistribute its beer locally or what product mix will be shipped here. “The rumormill was cranking up, and we wanted to get something out,” said Bryan Simpson,the company’s media relations director, of the announcement.However, Simpson said that Fat Tire will most likely be available here in kegs andbottles, though not in cans, at least not initially. “Ranger IPA will probably be in the mix,” he added, along witha wheat beer (either Sunshine Wheat or Mothership Wit), possibly the 1554 Enlightened Black Ale and the fallseasonal, Hoptober Golden Ale, a hoppy pale ale brewed with rye and oats.New Belgium presently markets its beers in 26 states. In 2010, according to Simpson, the brewery produced “alittle over 660,000 barrels,” up around 12 percent over the previous year.New Belgium and Outside Magazine use beer and social media to help dogs | KyleJanuary 27, 2011GarrattNew Belgium Brewing Co. is teaming up with Outside Magazine to take advantage of dog owners’ desires totake pictures of their dogs and eagerly share them with anyone who’s alive. Coinciding with the release ofMighty Arrow Pale Ale is a Facebook campaign through which friends of both the brewery and magazine canenter photos of their dogs; each entry yields a $1 donation (up to $10,000) to the Humane Society.“We started to think about unique ways we could leverage some of the organic engagement we had onFacebook already,” says Adrian Glasenapp, brand activist at New Belgium. “A lot of people were posting imagesof their pets and dogs. For them it seemed like drinking our beer with their best friend, their dog, was a prettycommon theme.” page 1
  15. 15. Friends of New Belgium and Outside can submit pictures and videos of their dogs through Facebook. Each week for the next six weeks, the dog owner who submits the cutest or most entertaining photo or video will receive a New Belgium hat, a recycled Frisbee, a dog collar made of recycled tire tubes and a year’s subscription to Outside. The Mighty Arrow Pale Ale is New Belgium’s spring seasonal beer for the third year and a tribute to Arrow, an Aussie/border collie mix that belonged to New Belgium’s CEO Kim Jordan and used to roam the brewery. The dog love doesn’t just come from the New Belgium side. On the campaign’s Facebook page is a video of Outside contributor Grayson Schaffer’s yellow lab fetching aMighty Arrow out of the vending machine.“With the Mighty Arrow Social Campaign, we want to continue to tell the unique story of our brand and ourbeer while engaging directly with consumers in a fun and dynamic way on the social web,” says Glasenapp.“We also want to put the consumer at the center of our message and provide a way for them to tell their NewBelgium and/or Mighty Arrow story through the eyes of their best friend.”The promotion started on Monday, and more than 2,000 entries have already rolled in. The donation limit of$10,000 should come rather quickly; a Facebook fan base of around 270,000 has been subtly alerted that NewBelgium has a new beer for sale and that Outside subscriptions are still available.“Marketing with meaning more and more has become a proven way to connect with people on a deeper leveland engage people,” says Glasenapp. “And where there is engagement, there are sales.”The campaign is a perfect fit for New Belgium -- and not just because it helps the Humane Society and coulddrive revenue. “Intrinsic to the beer and intrinsic to the message and story behind the beer is that connectivitywe have with dogs,” says Glasenapp. “With our culture being a humane and conscious culture, a lot of the petswe have as a company are adopted dogs.” page 1
  16. 16. January 27, 2011Colorado BusinessNew Belgium Brewing of Fort Collins announced plans to expand its market territory to Virginia, Maryland andWashington, D.C., in September.P2 Energy Solutions awarded $578,000 of in-kind contributions to the business-administration program ofWestern State College of Colorado in Gunnison. The contribution will be used to help students majoring in landand resource management.Chuck Don’s Pet Food Outlet, a Minnesota-based pet-food and -supply retailer, has opened its first Denverlocation at 201 University Blvd. Several locations are planned for the Denver market.Western Union Co. of Douglas County and InComm, a provider of gift and prepaid cards, announced thatthey have agreed to offer Western Union General Purpose Reloadable prepaid cards. The Western UnionMoneyWise card will first be offered in the U.S. through InComm retail locations.Shane Co., a Centennial-based privately held jeweler, has developed an online charm-jewelry customizationplatform compatible with touch-screen devices, including the iPhone and iPad. Shane’s CharmBuilder allowsusers to select a style of bracelet, pendant or earrings and then add and remove charms with a drag-and-dropinterface.Whiting Petroleum Corp. declared a two-for-one split of its common stock. Stockholders of record at the closeof business Feb. 7 will be entitled to receive one additional share of Whiting common stock for each shareowned.Level 3 Communications Inc. of Broomfield announced it has been selected to provide content-delivery-network services to support live streaming of WealthTV’s lifestyle-channel content over the Internet.Colorado Transportation Commission has awarded $15 million of FASTER (Funding Advancement for SurfaceTransportation Economic Recovery) funds to governments and agencies statewide for local transit projects. page 1
  17. 17. page 1
  18. 18. February 1, 2011Super Bowl Party Upgrade: Barrel-Aged Beers Super Bowl Party Upgrade: Barrel-Aged Beers A handful of U.S. brewers have adopted an old European tradition of aging beer in wood casks - generally used bourbon or zinfandel barrels - to impart a richness of taste that modern production can’t touch. Here are the best. Two Brothers Long Haul The Chicago area’s Two Brothers ages this 4.2 percent clean-finishing “session ale” in foudres, French oak casks, for a month (twobrowsbrew. com). Full Sail Black Gold Full Sail has been barrel aging since 1997. Its latest, a 10.5 percent stout, is coffee-black with hints ofvanilla and dark chocolate (fullsailbrewing.com).Firestone Walker Velvet MerlinThis chocolaty oatmeal stout is partially aged in bourbon barrels for half a year, which adds layers of mouth-watering complexity (firestonewalker.com).The Bruery Black TuesdayThe Bruery just dropped its second-annual 18-plus percent bomb of a stout, with toasted malt and notes ofmolasses and espresso (thebruery.com).Avery DepuceleuseFewer than 450 cases exist of this delicious, rare, and strong Colorado ale, brewed with sour cherries and wildyeasts in zinfandel barrels (averybrewing.com).New Belgium Eric’s AleWood aging lighter styles like this 7 percent ale brings out sour flavors that can complement the decadence ofwinter cooking incredibly well (newbelgium.com). page 1
  19. 19. February 3, 2011Jeff Glor Becomes a Brew MasterJeff Glor shadowed his Beer Shepherd brother Dave Glor, New Belgium, as he traveled from bar to bartaste-testing draft beers. Jeff also tried his hand at brewing.See flash drive for full video.Blizzard doesn’t deter cyclist | Julie DeardorffFebruary 3, 2011 Chicago’s third snowiest blizzard in recorded history didn’t stop Erick (Iggi) Ignaczak, who swapped his car for a hand-built commuter bike over the summer and has committed to living car- free for a year. Iggi, an avid cyclist, is used to riding his bike year-round and braving temperatures as low as minus-16 degrees Fahrenheit. And though Tuesday was his first significant blizzard, he made it home to the West Loop from his office in Wood Dale partially using his bike, unlike the thousands of commuters stuck in their cars on Lake Shore Drive.Iggi’s work commute consists of six miles of bike riding each day, plus a 35-minute train ride. This morning,with temperatures around 2 degrees Fahrenheit, Iggi wore a t-shirt, fleece shirt, fleece jacket, water/windproof outershell, base layer pants, fleece pants, cargo pants, ski pants, wool socks, waterproof boots, linergloves, lobster gloves, balaclava, neck gaiter, two hats, ski goggles, and a helmet.He was sweaty by the time he got to Union Station and arrived at work on time. Then he waited half an hourfor his co-workers get there.“I’m definitely still riding. I’m committed to doing so,” said Iggi, who recorded 254 miles on the bike for themonth of January. page 1
  20. 20. On Tuesday, after incessantly checking his weather app, Iggi left work a little early. He had no problem gettingto the train but when he got off, the snow was falling horizontally.“The wind was not my friend and it felt like I was leaning to the side the whole time,” he said.Still, he made it home, stopping at a Polish deli for some food. And though he did a test ride around the blockat night to possibly meet up with the ‘snow ride’ that meets up at the Corner Bar in Bucktown after any new2-inch snowfall, “it just wasn’t happening,” he said. “I had to push the bike home.”The car-for-bike swap is hosted by New Belgium Brewing’s Tour de Fat, a traveling bicycle carnival, which worksto get more cars off the road by giving volunteers around the country handmade commuter bikes if they agreeto give up their car.The money for Iggi’s car went to West Town Bikes, New Belgium Brewing’s nonprofit partner, which promotesbicycling in the city, educates youth with a focus on under-served populations, and fosters and serves Chicago’sgrowing bicycling community. Overall, the Tour de Fat event, held over the summer, raised $14,000 to helpfund West Town Bikes.February 3, 2011Products That Should Never MergeJay shows you what would happen if common everyday products merged. Fat Tire is featured.See flash drive for full video. page 20
  21. 21. St. Louis teacher taps into brewing success | Evan BennFebruary 10, 2011 Thanks to a little luck and a lot of beer know-how, a St. Louis-area schoolteacher is taking an all-expenses-paid trip to Fort Collins, Colo., next week to help brew a new beer at New Belgium Brewing Co. Pamela Harris won the honor after pulling off an impressive feat at a New Belgium-hosted event at Soulard Park last summer. She drank from a cup containing a mystery blend of three New Belgium brews and then correctly guessed not only the beers — Skinny Dip, Fat Tire and Trippel — but also what percentage of each went into the concoction. “I sort of did it by process of elimination,” says Harris, a high school English teacher. “I figured if there was any Ranger IPA in there, I would be able to taste it, and if there was any 1554, that would make the liquid darker than itwas. Besides, Skinny Dip has been one of my favorite summer beers for a while, and I’ve been drinking Fat Tiresince probably my junior year of college.”The luck came in later, when New Belgium picked Harris out of a random drawing of people across the countrywho had successfully identified the blended beers.She found out in October that she’d be going to Colorado to collaborate on a beer for the brewery’sexperimental Lips of Faith series.“It’s such a surreal feeling — I never win anything,” she says.Harris will fly to Colorado on Feb. 18. The next day, she and New Belgium assistant brewmaster Grady Hull willplot out their brewing plans, and then they’ll spend all of Feb. 21 making the beer.A fan of American pale ales and India pale ales, Harris says she’s considering asking Hull to make a beer that’s“hoppy but balanced, and maybe with something unique like lavender or grapefruit.”Her other request: nothing with a crazy-high alcohol content.“I want this to be a beer that you can have before dinner or while you eat dinner,” she says. “You should beable to have two or three and not feel like it’s too sweet or too fruity or too much alcohol.”Harris’ beer (doesn’t “Pamela’s Ale” have a nice ring to it?) is expected to be released in time for this summer’sClips of Faith tour, during which New Belgium screens short videos that its customers have made. page 21
  22. 22. The tour will make a stop in St. Louis at 7:30 p.m. May 19 at Forest Park’s World’s Fair Pavilion, with beerproceeds to benefit Trailnet.Although the best way to taste the limited-release beer will be at one of the Clips of Faith events, St. Louis mayreceive a few extra kegs to celebrate its hometown winner, says Michael Hogan, New Belgium’s area managerhere.“We are pleased as punch to have a hometown girl make good,” Hogan says. “We are sure she will representthe spirit and pride of a great beer town like St. Louis in the beer she helps brew.”Although Harris has no homebrewing background, she says this experience might be the push she needs to getstarted on that hobby.“Part of me thinks, ‘Hmm, maybe this will be my summer project,’” she says. “I love beer, and I’m fascinatedwith the brewing process. I think it’s amazing that you can take four simple ingredients and make so manytypes of beer.”This contest — guessing the three mystery beers and their proportions — has been going on in-house atNew Belgium for a few years and has resulted in Lips of Faith brews like Tom’s Beer, Adam’s Ale, Eric’s Ale andJessica’s Porter. Harris’ collaboration will mark the first time a non-New Belgium employee has been allowed tohelp create a Lips of Faith beer.“I’m really excited to be part of this,” says Harris, whose favorite Lips of Faith beer is Biere de Mars, made withlemon peel and wild yeast. “It also means a lot to be working with a company that I have always respected foreverything they stand for — really, really good beer, employee-owned, and sustainable and green.”MIT grad’s invention turns brewery waste to fuel | John CurranFebruary 13, 2011Before he started “saving the earth, one beer at a time,” all inventor Eric Fitch knew about home brewing wasthat it could make quite a mess.Once, he accidentally backed up the plumbing in his apartment building by dumping into his garbage disposalthe spent grain left over from his India Pale Ale home brew. The oatmeal-looking gunk choked the pipes in hisCambridge, Mass., building, flooding the basement.These days, he’s doing something more constructive, fulfilling the dream of beer lovers everywhere byrecycling the stuff: The MIT-trained mechanical engineer has invented a patented device that turns brewerywaste into natural gas that’s used to fuel the brewing process.The anaerobic methane digester, installed last year at Magic Hat Brewing Co. in Vermont, extracts energy fromthe spent hops, barley and yeast left over from the brewing process -- and it processes the plant’s wastewater.That saves the brewer on waste disposal and natural gas purchasing. page 22
  23. 23. The 42-foot tall structure, which cost about $4 million to build, sits in the back parking lot of Magic Hat’sbrewery, where it came online last summer.Fitch, 37, is CEO of PurposeEnergy, Inc., of Waltham, Mass., a renewable energy startup company whose loneproduct is the biphase orbicular bioreactor, which is 50 feet in diameter, holds 490,000 gallons of slurry andproduces 200 cubic feet of biogas per minute.Brewers big and small have wrestled with waste issues since the dawn of beer-making. In recent years, they’veturned to recycling -- both as a cost-saver and for environmental reasons.Anheuser-Busch, which makes Budweiser, uses a bio-energy recovery system in 10 of its 12 U.S. breweries toconvert wastewater into natural gas that’s then used to fuel the brewing process.New Belgium Brewing Co., in Fort Collins, Colo., captures excess heat from cooling wort and funnels it beneathits loading dock so it doesn’t ice up in wintertime. The wort, the liquid made with malt and hot water, isfermented to make beer or ale.Coors’ breweries sell ethanol from their brewing process to refineries in Colorado. Some European breweriesdry their spent grain and then burn it, using the heat and energy in their manufacturing process.Most operations dispose of their spent grain by selling it -- or giving it away -- to farmers, for use as cattle oranimal feed.But PurposeEnergy says its digester is the first in the world to extract energy from the spent grain and then re-use it in the brewery, and all in one place. At Magic Hat, the big brown silo is located about 100 feet from themain complex.“Feeding it to cattle is pretty direct recycling, especially if you get steak back out of it,” said Julie Johnson,editor of All About Beer magazine. “Carting it off as animal feed is pretty common. In this case, by closing theloop at the brewery, this is turning it into savings quite directly for Magic Hat.”After getting the idea in 2007, Fitch pilot tested it in Florida, taking spent grain from a Yuengling Son breweryin Tampa, Fla., trucking it to a farm and putting it through a 400-gallon methane digester. That helped refinethe design of the facility. Then he scouted New England breweries that might agree to a pilot project and got abite from Magic Hat, which had been looking for ways to reduce its wastewater treatment bill.“Over the years, we looked at ways of reducing it, and the strain on South Burlington’s system, and we cameup with ideas ranging from using women’s pantyhose to filter solids while flushing the brew kettle to havingthe spent grains hauled off to a local farm to be used for feed,” said Steve Hill, social networking manager forNorth American Breweries, which owns Magic Hat.“They (PurposeEnergy) laid out what we could save . and how the digester could benefit things from a ‘green’standpoint, and it was too good to pass up,” Hill said in an e-mail.Other than the plume of flame that rose up off the top of the silo -- triggering a few panicky calls by neighborsto the fire department -- it has succeeded.“There’s a lot of money to be saved, there’s a lot of strain to be taken off local wastewater systems,” accordingto Hill. “The carbon footprint of a brewery is lessened a great deal when there’s a power company in theirbackyard.” page 2
  24. 24. Others are taking notice.“It’s something that’s definitely exciting for breweries to look at,” said Mark Wilson, brew master at AbitaBrewing Co., in Abita Springs, La., who is at work on a handbook outlining environmentally friendly brewingoperations for the Master Brewers Association of the Americas.Fitch, whose company’s slogan is “Saving the earth, one beer at a time,” has helped develop iPhoneapplications that allow him to control pumps and other operations within the digester. He says it can savebrewers up to $2 per barrel in costs, a considerable savings for even a medium-sized operation like Magic Hat,which produces about 154,000 barrels of beer a year.“I hope to be in large breweries throughout the world,” he said.MIT grad’s invention turns brewery waste to fuel | John CurranFebruary 13, 2011Before he started “saving the earth, one beer at a time,” all inventor Eric Fitch knew about home brewing wasthat it could make quite a mess.Once, he accidentally backed up the plumbing in his apartment building by dumping into his garbage disposalthe spent grain left over from his India Pale Ale home brew. The oatmeal-looking gunk choked the pipes in hisCambridge, Mass., building, flooding the basement.These days, he’s doing something more constructive, fulfilling the dream of beer lovers everywhere byrecycling the stuff: The MIT-trained mechanical engineer has invented a patented device that turns brewerywaste into natural gas that’s used to fuel the brewing process.The anaerobic methane digester, installed last year at Magic Hat Brewing Co. in Vermont, extracts energy fromthe spent hops, barley and yeast left over from the brewing process -- and it processes the plant’s wastewater.That saves the brewer on waste disposal and natural gas purchasing.The 42-foot tall structure, which cost about $4 million to build, sits in the back parking lot of Magic Hat’sbrewery, where it came online last summer.Fitch, 37, is CEO of PurposeEnergy, Inc., of Waltham, Mass., a renewable energy startup company whose loneproduct is the biphase orbicular bioreactor, which is 50 feet in diameter, holds 490,000 gallons of slurry andproduces 200 cubic feet of biogas per minute.Brewers big and small have wrestled with waste issues since the dawn of beer-making. In recent years, they’veturned to recycling -- both as a cost-saver and for environmental reasons. page 2
  25. 25. Anheuser-Busch, which makes Budweiser, uses a bio-energy recovery system in 10 of its 12 U.S. breweries toconvert wastewater into natural gas that’s then used to fuel the brewing process.New Belgium Brewing Co., in Fort Collins, Colo., captures excess heat from cooling wort and funnels it beneathits loading dock so it doesn’t ice up in wintertime. The wort, the liquid made with malt and hot water, isfermented to make beer or ale.Coors’ breweries sell ethanol from their brewing process to refineries in Colorado. Some European breweriesdry their spent grain and then burn it, using the heat and energy in their manufacturing process.Most operations dispose of their spent grain by selling it -- or giving it away -- to farmers, for use as cattle oranimal feed.But PurposeEnergy says its digester is the first in the world to extract energy from the spent grain and then re-use it in the brewery, and all in one place. At Magic Hat, the big brown silo is located about 100 feet from themain complex.“Feeding it to cattle is pretty direct recycling, especially if you get steak back out of it,” said Julie Johnson,editor of All About Beer magazine. “Carting it off as animal feed is pretty common. In this case, by closing theloop at the brewery, this is turning it into savings quite directly for Magic Hat.”After getting the idea in 2007, Fitch pilot tested it in Florida, taking spent grain from a Yuengling Son breweryin Tampa, Fla., trucking it to a farm and putting it through a 400-gallon methane digester. That helped refinethe design of the facility. Then he scouted New England breweries that might agree to a pilot project and got abite from Magic Hat, which had been looking for ways to reduce its wastewater treatment bill.“Over the years, we looked at ways of reducing it, and the strain on South Burlington’s system, and we cameup with ideas ranging from using women’s pantyhose to filter solids while flushing the brew kettle to havingthe spent grains hauled off to a local farm to be used for feed,” said Steve Hill, social networking manager forNorth American Breweries, which owns Magic Hat.“They (PurposeEnergy) laid out what we could save . and how the digester could benefit things from a ‘green’standpoint, and it was too good to pass up,” Hill said in an e-mail.Other than the plume of flame that rose up off the top of the silo -- triggering a few panicky calls by neighborsto the fire department -- it has succeeded.“There’s a lot of money to be saved, there’s a lot of strain to be taken off local wastewater systems,” accordingto Hill. “The carbon footprint of a brewery is lessened a great deal when there’s a power company in theirbackyard.”Others are taking notice.“It’s something that’s definitely exciting for breweries to look at,” said Mark Wilson, brew master at AbitaBrewing Co., in Abita Springs, La., who is at work on a handbook outlining environmentally friendly brewingoperations for the Master Brewers Association of the Americas.Fitch, whose company’s slogan is “Saving the earth, one beer at a time,” has helped develop iPhoneapplications that allow him to control pumps and other operations within the digester. He says it can savebrewers up to $2 per barrel in costs, a considerable savings for even a medium-sized operation like Magic Hat,which produces about 154,000 barrels of beer a year.“I hope to be in large breweries throughout the world,” he said. page 2
  26. 26. America’s Best Beer Cities 2011 | Evan S. BennFebruary 16, 2011 Denver (2 of 7) There’s a reason that brewers and beer fanatics descend upon Denver each year for the Great American Beer Festival: It’s smack- dab in the center of craft-beer country. Despite being in Coors’s back yard, brewpubs and beer bars here often pour the very best Colorado has to offer, from New Belgium in Fort Collins to Ska and Steamworks in Durango. Wynkoop Brewing Co. operates Denver’s oldest brewpub, established in 1988, which has beers and food to make anyone happy. If you like it hot, try Wynkoop’s house-brewed Patty’s Chile Beer, a light German-style beer made with Anaheim chiles and smoked Ancho peppers. You also can’t go wrong at the Falling Rock Taphouse, located half a block from Coors Field. With more than 75 beers on tap and scores more in bottles, drinking locally isn’t the challenge — it’s getting through everything that you’ll have trouble with.Fat Tire Ale Ad Format Makes Like ‘Mad’ Magazine | Karelene LukovitzFebruary 17, 2011In the highly commoditized beer business, differentiating the brand is often the core marketing challenge.Not so for New Belgium Brewing, which has attracted a substantial and fast-growing fan base with itsdistinctive and quirkily named craft beers (Fat Tire Amber Ale, Ranger India Pale Ale, Blue Paddle, MothershipWit, etc.) and an un-corporate culture expressed in its official “ideals” of “sustainability, balance and folly.”For the Fort Collins, Colo.-based brewery, the challenges lie more in managing to keep surprising fans andpotential converts with new marketing/advertising twists, on budgets that still fall somewhat shy of InBevlevels. page 2
  27. 27. But hey, in the immortal words of Mad magazine mascot Alfred E. Neuman, “What, me worry?” In fact, in a perhaps-inevitable development, this year, New Belgium and agency Cultivator Advertising Design have pulled inspiration right out of the pages of Mad. The idea: Adopt Mad’s iconic, irreverent fold-in spread feature format for a new campaign for flagship brew Fat Tire (named to commemorate the Belgian bike trip that led Jeff Lebesch to co-found New Belgium in 1991).The spread is unusual for its required mid-book placement -- Fat tire usually runs ads on magazine back covers-- as well as its ambitious (costly) physical format.The creative concept: Folded closed, the viewer sees a Fat Tire bottle (with its signature image of a fat tire bikeon the label), with copy labeling the ale “New Belgium’s Joy Ride.” Folded open, the spread shows caricaturesof New Belgium brewer Peter Boukaert (claiming that he’s “always hated Fat Tire” because “it’s the hardestbeer for us to make”) and company co-founder/CEO Kim Jordan (countering that she’s “always loved FatTire” for its balance and bicycle-culture origins/ethos). The retro design look is consistent with New Belgiumcampaigns as a whole, as well as past Fat Tire creative.The print component is being run in Outside, Rolling Stone, Men’s Journal, Wired, Dwell and 40-plus additionalalternative, outdoor and brew-related niche publications. In addition, the format has been adapted to recreatethe folding process/effect in 2-D for electronic versions running online and in Wired magazine’s iPad version.The creative isn’t the only novel element. On a bigger-picture level, New Belgium’s marketing strategy this yearcalls for dedicating more than half of its 2011 advertising budget to Fat Tire -- the largest percentage spent onthe brand in the past five years, according to the company, which produces more than 30 craft beers all told.That strategy reflects both Fat Tire’s status as the flagship of a company that’s this year celebrating twodecades in business and a planned market expansion for the brand, says Matt Neren, principal in the Cultivatoragency and co-account director for New Belgium. “This was the perfect time to use Fat Tire as a focal pointto celebrate 20 years of colorful history,” he notes. (No specifics yet available on the FT market expansion.New Belgium’s current overall distribution territory spans nearly all states west of the Mississippi and sevenMidwestern and Southern states.)Fat Tire continues to be New Belgium’s largest-selling brand, although its Ranger IPA, launched a year ago, isnow its second best-seller and currently its fastest-growing. The launch of Ranger (named after the brewer’s“Beer Rangers,” a/k/a sales force) was of course a major marketing focus last year.According to New Belgium, it sold more than 661,000 barrels across its brands last year, a 13% increase over2009. page 2
  28. 28. “I’ve Always Hated Fat Tire…” New Belgium brewmaster admits!!! | Lew BrysonFebruary 22, 2011Got your attention? Well, it’s just for fun...mostly. It’s all part of New Belgium’scelebration of their 20th year of brewing, and an anticipation of theircelebratory Super Cru, a ‘re-imagining’ of Fat Tire. I got the press release today,and that headline was just too good to pass up. Here’s the story.New Belgium brewmaster Peter Bouckaert did say “I’ve always hated Fat Tire…”about the brewery’s near-iconic Belgian-type pale ale, but he’s talking aboutbrewing it, not drinking it. “It’s the hardest beer for us to make,” he said. “Thehop/malt balance required makes me pull out what little hair I have left… [but]the Belgian inspiration, the elegance – it’s worth every ounce of frustration.”(For the record? I enjoy drinking a fresh Fat Tire, but like Anchor Steam, it’sreally at it’s best when snapping fresh. My favorite New Belgium beers are probably Blue Paddle Pilsner and1554 Black.)So, about that Super Cru...they’re talking about a June release. What is the Super Cru? They don’t know yet;it’s “a riff on the classic Fat Tire that is still in development.” Bouckaert spoke to that: “Do we go big andhoppy? Maybe sour? Add fruit? I do not know yet. It will be something memorable and probably it will makeus crazy getting there.” So...completely bald by June.Interesting to compare this to Victory’s Headwaters Pale Ale anniversary beer. Super Cru sounds like a one-shot (although, to be fair, so did La Folie when it first came out, so you never know), and something ...a bit*extreme*, while Victory deliberately skirted that with Headwaters, choosing instead to make a beer perhapsmore like Fat Tire, a popular, accessible, “shareable” beer that would become a regular year-round offering.Which is better? Does one have to be better? More beers, more choice: that’s better.And more 20th anniversaries for craft brewers: that’s great! Congratulations to all at New Belgium, particularlyto co-founders Kim Jordan and Jeff Lebesch, brewmaster Bouckaert, and to the current owners of the brewery:everyone who’s worked there for at least a year, which is one of the completely awesome things about NewBelgium...but only one of them. It’s a pretty amazing company. Cheers! page 2
  29. 29. February 24, 2011Jeremiah McWilliamsNew Belgium Brewing, maker of Fat Tire, plans to expand along eastern seaboard |New Belgium Brewing, maker of Fat Tire Amber Ale and other beers, plans to expand its market territory alongthe eastern seaboard. The Colorado brewer wants to begin selling in Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C.in September. If all goes according to plan, the added territory will bring the nation’s third-largest craft brewerto 29 states. New Belgium’s beers are already available in Georgia.“We had significant expansion in 2009 when we added five states,” said sales director Joe Menetre. “Wewanted to make sure we had the capacity to keep up with that demand.”The company said no decisions have been made regarding distributor partners, brands or package for the newmarkets.February 26, 2011open books | Lynn HicksBrewing firm’s recipe for a great place to work includes free beer, free bikes andThat’s just part of Colorado-based New Belgium Brewing Co.’s recipe for creating a great place to work. It takesmore than a menu of generous benefits.“One thing I hear more than anything that makes us special is, ‘I get to come to work and be myself,’ “ KimJordan, CEO of the craft brewer that makes Fat Tire Amber Ale, said in an interview last week. “It’s OK to askquestions. It’s OK to suggest hare-brained ideas and not get a demerit.”Jordan spoke at Iowa State University last week, and I asked her advice on creating a unique culture. Her FortCollins, Colo., company has been named a top place to work by the Wall Street Journal, Outside magazine andWorldBlu, which measures the most democratic workplaces.The Register this year will recognize Iowa’s top workplaces for the first time. About 3,800 employees have beensurveyed so far, and we’re hearing why they love their jobs.“We are listened to and made to feel we are part of something bigger,” said one Iowa employee. The employeris confidential - we’ll reveal our list of top workplaces this fall. page 2
  30. 30. At New Belgium, doing business is about something bigger. Its purpose statement: “To operate a profitable brewery which makes our love and talent manifest.” Jordan, a former social worker, founded the company in 1991 with her then-husband. They started brewing in their basement, and the company grew quickly. It’s the third-largest craft brewer in the United States, with more than $100 million in sales a year. New Belgium has sold its beer in Iowa for three years, and it has become one of the top three best sellers of craft beer in central Iowa, said Mike Brewington, president of Iowa Beverage Systems in Des Moines. New Belgium advertises more than Fat Tire, however. The company’s mission includes being a business role model for itstriple bottom-line approach: people, planet and profits.“We spend a lot of time in this endeavor called work. If it doesn’t touch you in your soul, then it’s not a goodinvestment of time,” Jordan said.Jordan offered her advice with a caution: If you want to emulate New Belgium’s practices, you must pursueyour business passionately, not simply because you think it will give you a competitive advantage.“For me, doing this halfheartedly or haphazardly, and some point saying, ‘Eh, this is too much work,’ is theworst outcome. It may be worse than not trying at all,” she said.Here are some of Jordan’s tips:Give great perks: Every employee gets two six-packs a week. After working at New Belgium for a year, allemployees get ownership in the company, plus a free cruiser bike. After five years, they get a trip to Belgium.But Jordan said it’s important to know when to say no to requests, as she did when employees sought a six-month sabbatical program. “I have a responsibility to make sure the company is financially sound. Co-workersneed to feel that same pinch.”Be transparent: Jordan practices open-book management. The company is privately held, but managers sharefinancial performance with employees. She decided to do this in 1995, when she asked employees to estimatehow much the company spent on raw materials, labor and other expenses, and how much was left over forprofit. Employees figured the company was making 60 percent margins.“We looked at the answers and laughed,” she said. “If people are making up these stories about where themoney goes, then this is an opportunity for transparency.” As a first step, she recommends providing financialliteracy training to employees.Live your principles: From the beginning, the company has focused on environmental stewardship. Thecompany measures the carbon footprint of a six-pack of Fat Tire, it diverts about 97 percent of its waste fromthe landfill and it has the largest privately owned solar array in Colorado, among other sustainability efforts. page 0
  31. 31. Create a high involvement culture: Every August, all 385 New Belgium employees gather for a staff retreatoutside in the foothills of the Rockies. In small groups, workers offer ideas for the company’s one- and three-year strategic plans, as well as their personal work objectives. “It’s an incredibly powerful engine for us,”Jordan said.Trust each other and commit to authentic communication: This core principle is one of the hardest for thecompany, she said. One of its strengths is also its weakness: “We’re friends with another, and emotionallyclose,” she said. That makes it hard to have difficult conversations. “People pass on that more than it’s goodfor us,” she said. The company uses the Crucial Conversations and Crucial Confrontations training program toovercome that.Be clear who’s in charge: Sometimes, it’s right to give employees decision-making power. In 1998, managementtold co-workers: We want to switch to wind power, but that would reduce your profit-sharing checks, so we’retaking this to a vote. It was unanimously supported.Other times, leaders should get feedback but be clear about who will make the decision. “There are timesleadership requires tough decisions,” she said, while the group might choose the path that hurts the leastnumber of feelings.Plan for the future: In the rapidly consolidating beer industry, New Belgium gets offers to sell about everyweek, Jordan said. She tells suitors the answer is no while she forms a “perpetuation, liquidity and succession”plan.How would she ensure New Belgium’s culture thrived under a new owner?“I wish I could tell you I had the answer, but I don’t. We’re working on it.” page 1
  32. 32. page 2
  33. 33. Beyond the Bottom Line | Eric PetersonMarch 1, 2011 page
  34. 34. page
  35. 35. page
  36. 36. The Greenest Beer in the U.S.A. | Charles BevierMarch 1, 2011 The next time you crack open a Fat Tire beer you should congratulate yourself. Not only are you quaffing a delicious amber ale, you’re supporting a company that has one of the most cutting-edge, sustainable business strategies in America. Founded in 1991, New Belgium has grown considerable since its humble beginnings in a Fort Collins basement. Fat Tire remains the flagship brand for the company, but a half dozen of its other brews are proving popular with customers in more and more markets. Today the privately held company is one of the fastest-growing breweries in the country. With 370 employees, it is the third- largest craft brewer in the nationwith the seventh-largest sales volume. The company’s recipes have earned more than 90 awards.Environmental AccoladesJourney an hour north from Denver to tour the brewery, and you’ll discover the company’s sustainable stancewhen you enter the parking lot. It’s divided by vehicle mpg. If you drive a hybrid, you get to park next to thebuilding. If you drive a gas guzzler, you’re going to get some exercise.What’s happening inside the brewery has earned the company awards from more than 35 environmentalorganizations, including the Environmental Hero Award from the Environmental Defense Council, theConservation Hero Award from the Colorado Environmental Coalition, and an environmental and safetyexcellence award from Managing Automation Magazine — an that’s just in 2010. In 2009, the company earnedthe Best Green brewery ward from Tree Hugger and four of a possible four green leafs from Greentopia, bothonline directories of eco-friendly businesses.To encourage bicycling to work, employees are rewarded with a custom cruiser on their first anniversary ofemployment. They have access to bike lockers, covered bike parking, and locker rooms that would be the envyof many spas. New Belgium was named one of the only two platinum-level Bicycle-Friendly Businesses in thenation by the League of American Bicyclists. As of 2010, the company’s multicity Tour de Fat bike festival hasraised more than $1.5 million for bike-related causes. It also sponsors “bike-in” outdoor movies at the brewery,and proceeds from beer sales are donated to local non profits.The company has a green team called “The Sustainables,” but everyone can contribute ideas says JennOrgolini, sustainability director. page
  37. 37. “Most breweries are taking steps toward conservation. We try to be a market leader.”In 1998, New Belgium was the first brewery in America to purchase wind energy from a local utility insteadof coal-fired plants. It coasts a third more, but the employes — who own 43 percent of the company — votedfor the switch, even though the difference comes out of their bonuses. (The company practices open-bookmanagement regarding operating costs.)Using Department of Energy grants, New Belgium recently installed the largest private collection of solarpanels in Colorado, a 200kW array atop the packing hall. The renewable electricity source is projected toreplace almost 264,000kW of coal-powered electricity each year.The brewery produces an additional 15 percent of its electricity by harvesting methane from its on-sitewater treatment facility. Microbes are used to clean the production wastewater through a serious of aerobicbasins. The methane gas, a by-product of this process is piped back to the brewery, where it powers a 292kWcombined heat and power engine. The company also has one of the lowest water-to-beer production ratesin the nation. Most breweries use about 6 barrels of water (at 31 gallons each) to make a barrel of beer. NewBelgium uses 3.93 barrels (with a goal of 3.50 by 2015).In 2009, the company achieved its highest landfill diversion rate of 99.9 percent, meaning less than .1 percentof the company’s waste ends up in landfills. Spent grain is sent to a local cattle farm for feed. Sustainabilityeven extends to the transportation efforts, including 29 hybrid vehicles and two company bicycles for itsdistribution staff, who are know as Beer Rangers.Outside Magazine voted New Belgium the No. 1 Best Place to Work in the country, and The Wall Street Journalnamed it a Top Small Workplace. Orgolini is herself a testament to New Belgium’s appeal. A 17-year veteran ofthe company, she’s served as CFO and COO.In the Beginning...In the late 1980s in Belgium, Jeff Lebesch was riding one of the first mountain bikes with “fat tires” throughEuropean villages, sampling beers. An engineer who enjoyed tinkering, he went home to Fort Collins andrepurposed diary equipment in his basement to make beer. Friends and neighbors gave it glowing reviews anda business was born.But before Jeff and his wife, Kim Jordan, a social worker, even sold a bottle of beer, they hiked into RockyMountain National Park with a jug of their home brew and they wrote down what they wanted in theircompany. Their musings were the basis for today’s “high involvement culture” with a focus on a triple bottomline involved in the planet, profit, and people. Employees actively participate in the reduced usage of naturalresources and the increase in efficiency, all while having fun and feeling empowered.Kim Jordan is now CEO, and that vision is still the company’s guiding strategy. The company recently purchasedits first crop of Colorado-grown, organic hops, and it removed cardboard dividers from its 12 packs, savingpaper and money. New Belgium gives 1 percent of revenue to environmental nonprofits. In 2011, that willamount to $660,000.Most recently, New Belgium has joined the Business for Innovative Climate Energy Policy coalition, a groupof major American businesses pushing for the passage of comprehensive energy and climate legislation.“We’ve long strived to be a sustainable business role model, but we also recognize that legislative advocacy isvital to creating the conditions for widespread sustainable business practices,” says Orgolini. We can all drink tothat. page
  38. 38. March 2, 2011New Belgium celebrates 20th anniversary New Belgium Brewing Co. will celebrate its 20th anniversary of brewing beer with a nearly yearlong celebration called the Joy Ride campaign and includes a June release of a New Belgium Super Cru - a new twist on the company’s Fat Tire beer. The brewery will celebrate its two decades in business by paying homage to its signature beer Fat Tire with long-time employees posting some of their fondest memories about their time at the brewery on the company’s website. The brewery also will invite fans of its beer to post photosand videos on the site starting around Memorial Day weekend.In one of the first videos posted on the website as part of the Joy Ride campaign, New Belgium CEO and co-founder Kim Jordan comments on Fat Tire and her work cultivating the company’s brand.There will be a yet-to-be determined celebration on the anniversary June 26 at the brewery, said New BelgiumBrewing Co. spokesman Bryan Simpson, along with other events throughout the year. The brewery also plansto give away more than 3,000 of its signature cruiser bicycles this summer.In June, the brewery will unveil a new beer that is currently in the production process, Simpson said.The beer will be a limited release, like the brewery’s Lips of Faith series, in 22-ounce bombers and on draft.Simpson said they are looking to take their classic beer Fat Tire in a new direction.“Getting to re-imagine Fat Tire is an exciting opportunity,” said Peter Bouckaert, New Belgium brewmaster, in aprepared statement. ‘’Do we go big and hoppy? Maybe sour? Add fruit? I do not know yet. It will be somethingmemorable, and probably it will make us crazy getting there.”In the past 20 years, the company has grown from two employees to 380 and expanded from selling 60 cases aweek to being on tap at bars across the country.“This business couldn’t have happened without the city of Fort Collins,” Simpson said. “Front Range drinkersand craft drinkers helped grow this business.”And the company continues to expand this year as it moves into the Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginiamarkets.Simpson also said that in the next 12 months, New Belgium will open a new facility somewhere in the country.At this time, they are still trying to decide where. page
  39. 39. March 3, 2011Beer Madness: The panelistsAs always, we received hundreds of responses to our call for applications to our Beer Madness tasting panel,and we looked for a diverse range of readers in filling it out. We asked for a sentence summing up eachapplicant’s beer-tasting qualifications (the wittier, the better), and this year we also asked for a list of eachone’s five favorite domestic craft beers. The five reader-panelists and their answers are:Justin Garcia, 26CentrevilleLockheed Martin analyst“Over the last couple of years I have sampled beers from many different countries with friends and family,forsaking my liver and wallet . . . and have discovered that my favorite beers tend to be domestic craft brews,which made picking only five extremely difficult.”Favorite beers: Troegs Rugged Trail Nut Brown Ale, Lagunitas Censored (AKA the Kronik) Rich Copper Ale,Founders Breakfast Stout, Samuel Adams Imperial White, Dogfish Head 75 Minute IPA (60 Minute + 90 Minuteblend on tap).Hiromi Kowaguchi, 48ArlingtonHost at Best Buns Bread Co.“I also like my husband.”Favorite beers: Mad Fox American Pale Ale, Flying Dog Raging Bitch, Victory HopDevil, Samuel Adams SummerAle, Sierra Nevada Torpedo.Whitney Meager, 31Capitol HillNonprofit project manager“When my parents come to stay with me, in my studio apartment, for sometimes up to a month, I alwaysfeel fully ‘reimbursed’ for my hospitality when I see their trunk, which has been well stocked with a variety ofBoulevard beers — one of the greatest Kansas City exports.”Favorite beers: Boulevard Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale, New Belgium Trippel Belgian Style Ale, Bell’s Oberon Ale,Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar, Sierra Nevada Kellerweis.Duff Gillespie, 68KensingtonJohns Hopkins School of Public Health professor page
  40. 40. “Jerry Bailey and I started home-brewing in the 1980s, after which he soared to craft beer greatness byfounding the acclaimed Dominion Brewery, while I slipped anonymously into academia; now it’s my chance torise phoenix-like on a sea of suds.”Favorite beers: Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA, Duff Beer, Flying Dog Gonzo Imperial Porter, Ommegang AbbeyAle, Four Peaks Kilt Lifter.Christina Hoffman, 23ArlingtonConsultant“I might look like I should hold a cosmo, but the way to my heart is with abeer so dark I can’t see through it.”Favorite beers: Bluegrass Bourbon Barrel Stout, Hook Ladder Backdraft Brown, anything from BrooklynBrewery, Victory HopDevil, and the yet-to-be-named beer she made with her father last Father’s Day.Among our other shakeups in Beer Madness this year, we decided to open up spots on our tasting panel forprofessionals: people who taste for a living. We didn’t want just beer aficionados, though, but instead soughtout a range of related experiences. So joining the group of five reader-panelists are: 1. Greg Engert, 31, beer director at ChurchKey and our host for Beer Madness. 2. Kat Bangs, age 27, sommelier at Komi restaurant in Dupont Circle. 3. JP Caceres, 29, mixologist at Bourbon Steak in Georgetown. 4. Brian Robinson, 42, executive chef at Restaurant Three in Arlington. 5. Ellie and Bob Tupper, 60 and 64, respectively, contract brewers of Tuppers’ beers. (Ellie tasted all 64 beers for Round 1 on our first night of tasting, and Bob stepped in to take her place because of illness for the remaining rounds on the second night of tasting.)Airports embrace local design, dining and retail | Roger YuMarch 3, 2011Ever get off a flight, walk into a terminal, look around and wonder where you are?Many airports have a sameness to them. Concourse designs, signs for chain restaurants and rows of familiar-looking plastic seats say: I could be anywhere in the USA.That’s changing. Airports in many parts of the country are incorporating local history, themes and images toreflect the region they’re in. They’re doing it architecturally as they construct or rebuild terminals. page 0
  41. 41. They’re adding local flavor by signing deals with local restaurants and retailers to take dining and shoppingbeyond the standard menus and wares of national chains.Their goal is not only to reflect a unique local feel, but to distinguish themselves amid intense competition forair service and a need for more revenue. And, some say, it’s paying off.“The airport needs to serve as the mouthpiece or showcase for tourism and business within the city and theregion,” says Mark Gale, CEO of Philadelphia International Airport. “It’s the old cliché: It’s the first and lastthing (a traveler sees). And sometimes, it’s the only thing. It’s important to make a statement.”Many airports, such as Raleigh-Durham International, are making such statements — in overarching ways.Raleigh-Durham’s new Terminal 2, which was completed in January, is a sloping stainless steel structuredesigned by North Carolina-born architect Curtis Fentress to evoke the low, rolling hills of the Piedmontmountains that wind through much of the state.The terminal’s wooden ceiling beams are a tribute to the area’s legacy of furniture manufacturing. Stainlesssteel and large windows are meant to reflect progress and the Research Triangle’s technology orientation.“Passengers tend to get a picture fairly quickly that there’s a story being told,” says John Brantley, the airport’sdirector. “Folks have associated us with The Andy Griffith (show) for so many years. We’re no longer Mayberry.This terminal reflects that the region has grown up.”Other airports, such as Los Angeles International, are going very local with food and retail stores that givetravelers a taste of regional cuisine and indigenous or locally produced goods.When the airport approved new concession contracts for Terminals 4, 5, 7 and 8 in October, airport officialsannounced “almost all” of the stores and restaurants would be based on concepts and brands that haveSouthern California roots.“I thought it was very important to reflect flavors of L.A.,” says Gina Marie Lindsey, executive director of LosAngeles World Airports, a city agency that runs the airport. “There is a tremendous amount of diversity in L.A.”Examples: Lemonade, a Los Angeles-based restaurant created by chef Alan Jackson to serve simple Americancuisine, will open there later this year. Engine Co. No. 28, an upscale restaurant created by local chef KennethMcCaskill after restoring a firehouse in downtown Los Angeles, will also locate there.A bigger local roleEfforts by airports in the past to reflect their locale have largely been easy, cosmetic ones, such as rotatingpublic art exhibits and making the ads of local events and institutions prominent.Now, they’ve widened their creative scope as they wrest more control of terminals from financially strugglingairlines that have always objected to large airport spending, which is passed on to them and their customers.Airports’ increasing reliance on non-aviation revenue — food and beverage, retail shops and parking — tomake up for shrinking airline rent and landing fees has also stirred their creative urge, rooted in the belief thatmore diverse, local offerings will drive travelers to spend more.“There is more of an approach to make (airports) a visitor center,” says Bill Hooper of Gensler, an airportarchitecture firm. “If you can make terminals feel more comfortable and interesting, people do (account forthat) in making decisions on what airport they want to fly to.” page 1

×