Expertus 2009 Clipbook

1,299 views

Published on

An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for year.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,299
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Expertus 2009 Clipbook

  1. 1. ExpertusMedia Presence 2009
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary 2009..............................................................................................page 3 to 19February 2009...........................................................................................page 20 to 31March 2009...............................................................................................page 32 to 40April 2009..................................................................................................page 41 to 45May 2009...................................................................................................page 46 to 52June 2009..................................................................................................page 53 to 58July 2009...................................................................................................page 59 to 65August 2009...............................................................................................page 65 to 72September 2009........................................................................................page 73 to 78October 2009.............................................................................................page 79 to 82November 2009.........................................................................................page 83 to 92December 2009.........................................................................................page 93 to 94
  3. 3. 2009 Predictions | Viplav BaxiJanuary 3, 2009It’s the new year and time to review some of the predictions I had made for 2008. PLEs will be shareable – tools shall arrive on the web that shall allow entire learning experiences to be sliced and shared between users. This shall be followed by ratings on which PLE slices are great. Any learner wanting to learn about a topic will take a PLE slice of a person who the com- munity says has mastered it and follow the learning path.Not much success here! Some notable attempts such as Twine helped in some way, as did others, but theconcept of shared learning experiences seemed to be too futuristic or useless for 2008. Better luck in 2009perhaps. Hybrid VLE + PLE systems – LMS/VLE enterprise systems shall incorporate many social construc- tivism inspired features and organizations will pick up this trend.Some luck here as major LMS vendors started putting in 2.0 features into their toolkit. But no real effort exceptperhaps for Mzinga which focused on Communities of Practice. This will pick up in 2009. The first classification systems to manage and search the huge amount of tagging will start to surface. Folksonomies will start getting structured in some way.The semantic web beckoned, and IMINDI was a start. I don’t reckon that this will catch up steam in the nearfuture either, but it is a start. The shift to rich Internet applications in e-learning using Flex and Silverlight among other tools, shall become a reality thus providing a boost to gaming and simulations for learning.Ah! This was perhaps more successful as a prediction. We can see some real movement this year with Silver-light courses being developed and Flex extending in RIAs. Learning process outsourcing will get established as a business model for small and medium companies.Doesn’t seem to be well entrenched, but companies such as Expertus and Intrepid seem to have taken largerstrides in the enterprise market.That sure is a mixed bag. I hope I do better with my 2009 predictions. Here they are: 1. Silverlight (more so) and Flex for learning development and tools will see a significant rise 2. LMS mindshare shall start being significantly impacted by Learning 2.0 solutions such as Mzinga and ELGG. As the adoption starts, enterprise measures/metrics will also start falling into place. Adoption of Learning 2.0 approaches will start in earnest in the second half of the year 3. LPO or Learning Process Outsourcing will gain momentum in 2009 4. The use of the mobile as a learning platform shall see renewed interest – the start of ubiquitous learn- ing being made possible by technological developments in the handset, services and network space 5. The use of virtual worlds for learning will acquire more importance – if things are right, it should mark the beginning of the end for traditional virtual classrooms. 6. Games and simulations will see an increased adoption page
  4. 4. The trends in the industry that shall back these predictions seem to be cutbacks on travel spend, need to bringin cost effective approaches to learning, higher engagement provided by games, simulations and virtual worldsand opportunities for enterprises to strategically pause and reflect on systemic changes in the light of therecessionary trends.That’s my take on the new year. Hope they are borne out by the events to follow! page
  5. 5. January 7, 2009Expertus Wraps Up 2008 Training Efficiency Masters SeriesExpertus (www.expertus.com), a global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning,today announced the end of its 2008 Training Efficiency Masters Series. The fourth webinar of the series“Numbers Don’t Lie: The 4 Universal Truths for Learning Measurement” was held on December 11, with over1,200 registered attendees, and a final white paper of the series will be available in January.“In 2008, we have been committed to bringing to light common themes surrounding efficiency within trainingorganizations and discussing these topics with learning executives everywhere,” said Ramesh Ramani, Founderand CEO of Expertus. “We decided to take a collective look at key challenges and showcase best practices solearning leaders feel empowered to build organizations that truly make an impact on the business.”The 2008 Training Efficiency Masters Series was designed to help learning executives transform theirorganizations into models of operational efficiency. Through research, webinars, white papers, CLO roundtablesand more, Expertus executives and strategic partners have offered practical insight and ideas about how tomaster a core dimension of learning efficiency. The topics addressed in 2008 were surrounding four pillars oftraining efficiency: Cost Leverage, Technology Optimization, Business Intelligence and Process Management.To hear webinars, including the recent, “Numbers Don’t Lie: The 4 Universal Truths for Learning MeasurementSuccess,” visit www.trainingefficiency.com.Also available:-- Survey Results: Customer Training Issues, Technology OptimizationIssues, Cost Optimization Issues and Marketing Training Internally-- Webinar Slides: Customer Training: Fast-Track Your Programs in a SlowEconomy, Secrets of Successful Learning Systems and 9 Ways to TrimOperational Costs to Fund Strategic Learning-- White Papers: Customer Training: 5 Ways to Fast-Track Programs in a SlowEconomy, Secrets of Successful Learning Systems, Centralize Service, NotBusiness Processes and How To Eliminate Training Waste and Reap the Rewards-- Roundtable Reports: Technology Optimization - Portals, and CostOptimization Issues-- And much more.“Our international clients speak the same language when it comes to their desire to run efficient, effectivelearning groups,” added Ramani. “We had a successful year, diving deep into research, reaching thousands ofpeople through surveys, webinars and more; we look forward to tackling more of these universal subjects inthe coming year.”For information on Expertus, please visit www.expertus.com. page
  6. 6. Appeared in print and onlineJanuary 10, 2009Survey Indicates Drop in Training Budgets and Limitations in Measuring ROIMountain View, Calif.A November 2008 study by Expertus and Training Industry Inc., “Measuring Learning as Budgets Tighten,”reveals that far more training budgets are decreasing than increasing in 2009. Despite the need to demonstratethe return on increasingly limited training investments, the study found that ROI and business impact metricsare not being used very often.For 2009, more than twice as many respondents expect budget decreases rather than increases. Forty-eightpercent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41 percent in 2008. By contrast, only 17 percentexpect their budgets to increase in 2009, up from 31 percent in 2008. Similarly, since 2008 budgets were firstapproved, far more saw decreases (38 percent) than increases (11 percent).“This research offers perspective on the current business environment’s impact on training budgets and howorganizations are measuring their activities,” said Ramesh Ramani, founder and CEO of Expertus. “With nearlyhalf (48 percent) of respondents watching their budgets decrease for 2009, the challenge becomes measuringinvestments and understanding their impact.”As training budgets become more limited in today’s challenging economy, it is increasingly important todemonstrate the impact of training funds through effective measurements. However, this survey of corporatetraining professionals revealed that volume and cost metrics, as well as Kirkpatrick Level I and II evaluations,are still used far more than business impact or return on investment metrics.As a result, those metrics are seldom used to influence budget or other types of important decisions. However,when they are collected, cost, ROI and business metrics are almost always used to support budget requests.“We weren’t surprised that there is a connection between how difficult a metric is to collect and how often itis collected,” added Doug Harward, CEO of Training Industry Inc. “However, we recommend that organizationsmake measuring the value and impact of learning a priority. This way, training organizations can make better-informed budgetary decisions about which training should be supported and which training needs to beimproved.”In addition to reporting on budget changes and metrics use, this research report also provides fresh data on:How cost-reduction pressure is increasing.Major challenges of learning measurement.Types of decisions that are well-supported by learning metrics and reporting capabilities.The survey was completed by 84 corporate and government training professionals in organizations withvarying sizes throughout 19 industries. Technology companies represented 25 percent of all survey-takers,while banking and finance companies were represented by almost one in six respondents. page
  7. 7. Training Tech Check | Gail DuttonJanuary 12, 2009It’s 2 a.m. in Sydney, but the lights are blazing in the home office of an expert Web developer for AlphaSoftware. Strange hours are the norm for programmers, but he’s not developing the next “killer app.” Instead,he’s hosting a live Webinar to help other developers build the next great thing. His audience, by the way, isonline during normal business hours, in real time, many time zones away. Simple technology made it possible.The glitches and time lags that plagued earlier e-learning platforms largely have vanished. We’re in the midstof a training evolution in which trainers are learning to leverage newer options to improve training efficacy,reduce training costs, and reach new audiences. The technology is especially beneficial in training internationalemployees, who historically receive less training than home-country employees, according to Gordon Johnson,vice president of marketing for infrastructure provider Expertus. In fact, a recent Expertus survey found thatonly 10 percent of the training budget is spent training employees at a company’s international sites.Online training helps trainers to tap a wealth of expertise from around the world, providing cutting-edge,expert content without the expense and logistical hurdles of assembling everyone in one location. Nelson HallResearch says that more than 50 percent of courses now are delivered online. But the training doesn’t all haveto occur online. Some of the most effective options combine face-to-face training with Webinars. For example,an online facilitator working in real time may stop periodically to let local groups discuss the material and applyit to their own situations, and reconvene at a predetermined time.“We need to move away from the tendency to jump on a plane. There always will be advantages to meetingface-to-face, but the benefits of alternatives often outweigh these,” emphasizes Kevan Hall, CEO of GlobalIntegration. As Johnson points out, “Online meetings are one-third the cost of face-to-face meetings, so thequestion becomes not which is best, but whether face-to-face training is three times better. Usually not.”“The biggest challenge in accessing technology for training is lack of familiarity with the tools,” Hall says.Hosting a Webinar or making a YouTube video is simple, requiring a computer with broadband access andsome imagination. Participating just requires the computer and broadband access. Transferring the signal toa large screen suitable for many viewers is generally as simple as connecting the screen to a PC with a singlecable.At “Play to Train,” an emergency response training course hosted in the Second Life virtual environment,the biggest challenge is teaching participants to navigate a virtual world, according to one of its developers,Rameshsharma Ramloll, Ph.D., research assistant professor at Idaho State University. That includes the conceptof avatars, how to navigate, how to talk with each other, and how to “buy” their virtual uniforms. “But that’snot a problem once it starts,” Ramloll adds. “There’s a lot of enthusiasm.”In that environment, the technical challenge was whether the participants—fire, police, and health-care page
  8. 8. workers—had computers capable of rendering the environment in real time. That required replacing many PCsand upgrading graphics cards, Ramloll says. Participants’ IT departments downloaded the client application toensure trainees could enter the virtual world easily.Typically, the greatest technical hurdle is communicating through the corporate firewall. That’s an easily solvedissue, but one worth addressing beforehand. Other potential stumbling blocks may be the number of peoplewho can log onto a conference simultaneously or a slow log-in process. Check with your own IT departmentand the conference host to ensure employees can log in easily and quickly. Test that beforehand. Then, recordthe session and keep it online afterward for those who missed the initial training or want to review it.“Play to Train” doesn’t replace real-world training, Dr. Ramloll emphasizes. Instead, it replaces dry lectures andalso serves as a test bed to improve preparedness plans before real-world exercises. The benefits, he says, arelowered training costs, better results, and more engaged participants.Those benefits of animation are working their way into technical training, too—even for consumers. “If you’vebought a new printer in the last few years, you’ve probably noticed the manual has been replaced with a quickstart guide, with electronic help files either onscreen on the machine or the PC,” points out Robin Lloyd, vicepresident and general manager of global content development for training firm Lionsbridge Technologies. “Oneclient found that downstream support costs decreased 40 percent” when consumer technical training involvedmultimedia. Other companies are using this just-in-time training to replace or augment lengthy classes. “It’sparticularly popular in the medical device, aerospace, and automotive industries,” Lloyd says.One-Way CommunicationAnother trend is delivering just-in-time training to employees via iPhones or Blackberries, breaking informationinto small chunks that are broadcast as podcasts or videos. That approach is especially popular in Asia, wheremobile devices dominate.In the U.S., Alpha Software takes this approach, posting demos and step-by-step instructions, among otherthings, on YouTube. Segments are less than 10 minutes. YouTube also can be a good way to introduce keypersonnel or new products. The benefit is that the videos are inexpensive to make and easy to access byanyone throughout the world with Internet access.Making a YouTube video requires a digital video camera, video editing software, and a way to transfer thevideo to the PC. MPEG4 video with MP3 audio is a popular file format combination that works with YouTube,although other formats are accepted. If your digital recording devices have other formats, they can beconverted with a mouse click once they’re loaded onto your computer. Keep a copy of your raw footage as abackup. More information about YouTube videos can be found at www.help.youtube.com.Webcasts are another option. Companies are using them to get more mileage out of presentations at keyconferences. Internally, they can provide training for particular skill sets—such as the latest regulatorycompliance guidelines—in which two-way communication is unnecessary. Often, these are audio only, or audiowith slides.Two-Way StreetWebinars—also called Web meetings or videoconferences—are a step beyond Webcasts. These interactivetechnologies are live seminars delivered over the Web, with real-time communications via phones, computermicrophones and speakers, or chat capabilities. Web meetings let participants talk, share, and annotatedocuments; have whiteboard capabilities; conduct real-time polls; and otherwise collaborate and interact as ifthey are face-to-face. Sessions can be recorded for later use with a mouse click, and the moderator can screenparticipants to ensure privacy if needed. page
  9. 9. WebEx (www.webex.com) and Microsoft Office Live Meeting (www.livemeetingplace.com) are two popularWeb meeting technologies. Hosting a Webinar generally involves e-mailing participants a conference link,signing on to the meeting site, and clicking an icon to share your computer screen with participants. Browser-based conferencing has an advantage over sites requiring software downloads because, as Lee Salz, CEO ofBusiness Expert Webinars, points out, “there are always a few who can’t download the software to get into themeeting.” page
  10. 10. January 12, 2009Expertus Experiences Dramatic Growth in Second Half of 2008Expertus (www.expertus.com), a global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning,today announced that it witnessed dramatic growth in its business during the second half of 2008. Expertusexecutives believe that the new business resulted from its expanded offering of learning solutions that impactbusiness and the need to do more with shrinking budgets.Expertus, which offers strategies, services and solutions that help learning organizations contribute directly tobusiness growth, has been retained by new customers from around the world, including: -- Autodesk -- SuperValu -- Ameriprise -- Baker Petrolite -- Pioneer Natural Resources -- Rambus -- Richardson -- Sainsbury -- Wyeth“We offer a new point of view about how organizations can take a hard look at their training infrastructure andmake critical improvements to do more with shrinking training budgets,” said Ramesh Ramani, Founder andCEO of Expertus. “Our products and services resonate with global organizations during this economic crunchbecause we are actually able to save them money.”Customers from a wide variety of industries tapped Expertus for its learning-related products and services,including learning technology, training administration, content creation and deployment, Web 2.0 portals,infrastructure solutions and more.Additionally, Expertus has become an industry leader by providing research, case studies and thoughtleadership around the topic of efficiency in tandem with the extremely successful Training Efficiency MastersSeries that recently came to a close. For information on the series and access to a library of resources on thetopic, visit www.trainingefficiency.com.“Learning organizations require business sense that includes total visibility, efficient practices, and solutionsthat make an impact on the business,” said Doug Harward, CEO of Training Industry, Inc. “Expertus has a deepunderstanding of these principles and is continually developing their knowledge on the subject. As a result,their customers benefit greatly.”For information on Expertus, please visit www.expertus.com or call Mike Murrell at 803-802-9971. page 10
  11. 11. January 13, 2009Survey Indicates Drop in Training Budgets and Limitations in Measuring ROIMountain View, Calif.A November 2008 study by Expertus and Training Industry Inc., “Measuring Learning as Budgets Tighten,”reveals that far more training budgets are decreasing than increasing in 2009. Despite the need to demonstratethe return on increasingly limited training investments, the study found that ROI and business impact metricsare not being used very often.For 2009, more than twice as many respondents expect budget decreases rather than increases. Forty-eightpercent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41 percent in 2008. By contrast, only 17 percentexpect their budgets to increase in 2009, up from 31 percent in 2008. Similarly, since 2008 budgets were firstapproved, far more saw decreases (38 percent) than increases (11 percent).“This research offers perspective on the current business environment’s impact on training budgets and howorganizations are measuring their activities,” said Ramesh Ramani, founder and CEO of Expertus. “With nearlyhalf (48 percent) of respondents watching their budgets decrease for 2009, the challenge becomes measuringinvestments and understanding their impact.”As training budgets become more limited in today’s challenging economy, it is increasingly important todemonstrate the impact of training funds through effective measurements. However, this survey of corporatetraining professionals revealed that volume and cost metrics, as well as Kirkpatrick Level I and II evaluations,are still used far more than business impact or return on investment metrics.As a result, those metrics are seldom used to influence budget or other types of important decisions. However,when they are collected, cost, ROI and business metrics are almost always used to support budget requests.“We weren’t surprised that there is a connection between how difficult a metric is to collect and how often itis collected,” added Doug Harward, CEO of Training Industry Inc. “However, we recommend that organizationsmake measuring the value and impact of learning a priority. This way, training organizations can make better-informed budgetary decisions about which training should be supported and which training needs to beimproved.”In addition to reporting on budget changes and metrics use, this research report also provides fresh data on: • How cost-reduction pressure is increasing. • Major challenges of learning measurement. • Types of decisions that are well-supported by learning metrics and reporting capabilities.The survey was completed by 84 corporate and government training professionals in organizations withvarying sizes throughout 19 industries. Technology companies represented 25 percent of all survey-takers,while banking and finance companies were represented by almost one in six respondents. page 11
  12. 12. January 19, 2009Expertus Experiences Dramatic Growth in Second Half of 2008Expertus, a global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning, today announced that itwitnessed dramatic growth in its business during the second half of 2008. Expertus executives believe that thenew business resulted from its expanded offering of learning solutions that impact business, and the market’sneed to accomplish more with shrinking budgets.Expertus, which offers strategies, services and solutions that help learning organizations contribute directly tobusiness growth, has been retained by new customers from around the world, including: • Autodesk • SuperValu • Ameriprise • Baker Petrolite • Pioneer Natural Resources • Rambus • Richardson • Sainsbury • Wyeth“We offer a new point of view about how organizations can take a hard look at their training infrastructure andmake critical improvements to do more with shrinking training budgets,” said Ramesh Ramani, Founder andCEO of Expertus. “Our products and services resonate with global organizations during this economic crunchbecause we are actually able to save them money.”Customers from a wide variety of industries tapped Expertus for its learning-related products and services,including learning technology, training administration, content creation and deployment, Web 2.0 portals,infrastructure solutions and more.Additionally, Expertus has become an industry leader by providing research, case studies and thoughtleadership around the topic of efficiency in tandem with the extremely successful Training Efficiency MastersSeries that recently came to a close. For information on the series and access to a library of resources on thetopic, visit www.trainingefficiency.com .“Learning organizations require business sense that includes total visibility, efficient practices, and solutionsthat make an impact on the business,” said Doug Harward, CEO of Training Industry, Inc. “Expertus has a deepunderstanding of these principles and is continually developing their knowledge on the subject. As a result,their customers benefit greatly.”For information on Expertus, please visit www.expertus.com or call Mike Murrell at 803-802-9971. page 12
  13. 13. January 26, 2009Training losing ground in the battle of the budgetsFinancial hardships caused by the economic recession have led even more organizations to cut spending onemployee training, according to two recent studies.The average amount companies spend on training per employee fell 11% in the past year, according to arecently released research report by Bersin Associates. Training expenditures per employee declined from$1,202 per trainee in 2007 to $1,075 per trainee in 2008.Bersin’s data also showed that the U.S. corporate training market shrank by more than $2 billion, from $58.5billion in 2007 to $56.2 billion in 2008, marking the greatest decline in more than a decade.This latest report mirrors another study released in November, revealing that more than twice as manycorporate and government training professionals expect training budget decreases rather than increases in2009.According to the study by training services firm Expertus, almost half (48%) of survey respondents expectsmaller training budgets in 2009, up from 41% in 2008. “When budgets became tight, organizations with a traditional training focus suffered most,” Bersin said in a statement. “Today’s business world demands a combination of formal and informal learning with an emphasis on collaboration, knowledge sharing, social networking, coaching, and mentoring.”A well-trained employee is one of your company’s best assets and worthy of the financial investment. Resistthe urge to take the “easy” way out by cutting development opportunities and find creative ways to stretchyour training budget.For more information on how to (and how not to) handle employee training in a recession, take a look at someof these related posts:--Cutting training, cutting safety: Is our economy causing more workplace injuries--Employee training and the budget battle--Training budgets, just another victim of the recession--‘Recession-proof’ employee training tips--5 tips for employee training on a tight budget page 1
  14. 14. Training Is Taking a Beating in Recession, Studies Find | Ed FrauenheimJanuary 26, 2009The recession is leading organizations to slash spending on training, two recent studies show.Average training expenditures per employee fell 11 percent in the past year, from $1,202 per learner in 2007to $1,075 per learner in 2008, according to a report issued Friday, January 23, by research firm Bersin Associates.Bersin said its figures include training budgets and payroll. Bersin also said the U.S. corporate training marketshrank from $58.5 billion in 2007 to $56.2 billion in 2008, the greatest decline in more than 10 years.Bersin’s report echoes a November study by training services firm Expertus and research provider TrainingIndustry. The survey of 84 corporate and government training professionals found that more than twice asmany respondents expect training budget decreases rather than increases for 2009.Forty-eight percent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41 percent in 2008. Only 17 percentexpect their budgets to increase in 2009. In addition, since 2008 budgets were first approved, far more sawdecreases (38 percent) than increases (11 percent).Bersin president Josh Bersin said organizations funneled money and staff into traditional and “oftennonstrategic” training programs in good years.“When budgets became tight, organizations with a traditional training focus suffered most,” Bersin said in astatement. “Today’s business world demands a combination of formal and informal learning with an emphasison collaboration, knowledge sharing, social networking, coaching, and mentoring.”The new reports confirm the old theory that training is among the first things cut during hard times, whichtoday include a U.S. economy estimated to have contracted by more than 5 percent in the fourth quarter, anunemployment rate that rose to 7.2 percent in December and thousands of job cuts announced daily.Trimmed training budgets also come amid a broader reassessment of employee development. In recentyears, experts have argued that workers increasingly see career development as vital in an employer. At thesame time, traditional, formal training in classrooms or through computer coursework has come under fire asless effective compared to less-formal modes of training, including on-the-job learning and the use of socialnetworking tools such as corporate wikis.Peter Cappelli, management professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, has suggestedthat employees share in the cost of training. In particular, he argues for tuition assistance programs, in whichemployees invest their time and effort on classes and class work.The Expertus-Training Industry report found that return-on-investment and business-impact metrics are notoften used to evaluate training programs. page 1
  15. 15. “We recommend that organizations make measuring the value and impact of learning a priority,” DougHarward, chief executive of Training Industry, said in a statement. “This way, training organizations can makebetter-informed budgetary decisions about which training should be supported and which training needs to beimproved.”In its 2009 Corporate Learning Factbook, Bersin said it found that companies have changed training programpriorities; moved to coaching, informal learning, collaborative activities and other less-costly training methods;and increased reliance on outsourcing. page 1
  16. 16. E-Learning and Depression 2.0 Revisited | Michael HanleyJanuary 29, 2009Prologue: Today’s post was meant to be a short piece about how the e-learning industry is faring in currentmarket conditions, but as I carried out my research for the article, something a little more worrying emergedfrom the source information.Now read on…About a year ago, I began commenting on the affects of the current financial crisis on the e-learning industry;it’s been a while, so I guess that it’s about time I revisited the subject. In my post Recession and the Challengeto E-Learning in February 2008 I remarked that: Historically, when a slowdown or organization rationalization occurs, the first against the wall are the folks in the PR, marketing, and training departments. Typically, individuals and organizations revert to previously-learned behaviors in tough times; this usually means going through the process of carrying out tried-and-tested, though not necessarily logical responses to the problems put in front of them. Outcome: tea and sympathetic chat, and the Training team get their pink slips / P45s. …I reckon that this will be strategy undertaken by a significant number of organizations over the next year or so.Sadly, it seems that my prediction was correct.According to a recent Expertus/Training Industry, Inc. report: for 2009 over twice as many trainingprofessionals who responded to their survey said that they expected budget decreases rather than increases.Forty-eight percent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41% in 2008. Less than one-fifth expecttheir budgets to increase in 2009, down from 31% in 2008. Similarly, since 2008 budgets were first approved,far more saw decreases (38%) than increases (11%) in funding and capital.These data are reinforced by the findings of a 2009 Bersin Associates study: BA’s Karen O’Leonard indicatedthat the U.S. corporate training market shrank from $58.5 billion in 2007 to $56.2 billion in 2008, the greatestdecline in revenue in over a decade.In a 23 January 2009 press release, Josh Bersin himself stated that …to reduce costs, companies are switching from e-learning [my italics] to coaching, collaboration and on-the-job training methodsThe press release also states: Today’s business world demands a combination of formal and informal learning with an emphasis on collaboration, knowledge sharing, social networking, coaching, and mentoring. While formal, instructor-led training is not going away, it is becoming a smaller and smaller percentage of training budgets.This shift in organizations’ thinking and strategy merits discussion in it’s own right, so I will return to the topiconce I have given it more consideration.However, I have to say that I’m not encouraged by the inaccurate terminology Mr. Bersin used in the pressrelease: I want to know - how do Bersin Associates define ‘e-learning’? Based upon the above statement, page 1
  17. 17. collaboration and knowledge-sharing in particular, but also mentoring, coaching, and OTJ training are notcategories of e-learning.I’m sure you have your own favorite definition of e-learning – I’ve included mine below – but regardless of howyou define it, you are in the e-learning domain if the learning materials are networked, delivered to end-users via a computer using standard internet technology, focused on the broadest view of learning.By e-learning, Bersin Associates of course mean “e-training” – those superannuated, expensive page-turnerstyle self-paced courseware libraries provided by vendors like SmartForce and HMH. You may argue that I ammerely fussing over semantics, and that such terminology is unimportant. Tomayto / tomahto.When questions are investigated using quantitative analysis, the Scientific Method is being used. Contingentwith that is a healthy skepticism of the assumptions and conclusions made by the investigator. This is theessence of progress, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. To betermed scientific, a method of inquiry must be based on gathering observable, empirical and measurableevidence subject to specific principles of reasoning and criticism.In this context I would assert that precise categorization of terms is an essential part of communicatingmeaning accurately. If you consider that e-learning is The continuous assimilation of knowledge and skills by adults stimulated by synchronous and asynchronous learning events – and sometimes knowledge management outputs – which are authored, delivered engaged with, supported and administered using internet technologies, (Morrison, D. 2004, p.4)then we must say that the Bersin statement contradicts itself.Based upon the Bersin Associates data (see Table 1), what seems to be occurring is a contraction in theuse by organizations of one e-learning modality (theself-paced page-turner – in a sense the methodologymost aligned with traditional instructor-led workplacelearning), and the growth or expansion of a range ofother modalities of e-learning, based upon non-formaland informal structures, Web 2.0 principles, and theremoval of intermediaries in the workplace learning development supply chain.Table 1 Distribution of training categories (after Bersin Associates, 2009)References:--Bersin Associates (2009) 2009 Corporate Learning Factbook Reveals 11% Decline in Corporate Training Spending [In-ternet] Available from: http://www.bersin.com/News/Content.aspx?id=8438 Accessed 24 January 2009--Expertus (2008) Measuring Learning as Budgets Tighten [Internet] Available from: http://www.trainingefficiency.com/system/files/Survey+Results_Learning+Measurement_+Expertus_Nov08.pdf Accessed 12 January 2009--Frauenheim, E. (2009) Training Is Taking a Beating in Recession, Studies Find Workforce Management. [Internet] Avail-able from: http://www.workforce.com/section/00/article/26/12/95.php Accessed 23 January 2009--Morrison, D. (2004) E-Learning Strategies: how to get implementation and delivery right first time Chichester: JohnWiley Sons, Ltd. page 1
  18. 18. January 29, 2009The Cost of TrainingAverage training expenditures per employee fell 11 percent in the past year, from $1,202 per learner in 2007to $1,075 per learner in 2008, according to a report issued Friday, January 23, by research firm Bersin Associates The report also showed the U.S. corporate training market shrank from $58.5 billion in 2007 to$56.2 billion in 2008, the greatest decline in more than 10 years.A November study by training services firm Expertus and research provider Training Industry found that morethan twice as many respondents expect training budget decreases rather than increases for 2009. Forty-eightpercent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41 percent in 2008. Only 17 percent expect theirbudgets to increase in 2009. In addition, since 2008 budgets were first approved, far more saw decreases (38percent) than increases (11 percent).It makes total sense to me, as training is seen as a “cost”, not an investment that immediately pays backdividends.Let’s look at some numbers… I’m all about the numbers.• According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov), the median wage of our country’s 134,000,000 employees is about forty-one thousand dollars or nearly twenty dollars per hour. For employees with a bachelor’s degree or higher, the average salary is 50 percent higher, sixty-six thousand dollars per year, or thirty-two dollars per hour.• The average replacement costs for higher educated (and higher skilled) is at least 50 percent of the employee’s annual salary, which means a company outlay of thirty-three thousand dollars for each replaced worker. That’s a lot of dollars and percents. What we now have to figure out is the ROI of training, the return oninvestment.Let’s skip the argument that training makes employees more valuable by giving them new or additional skillsthat can be used by their employer. It’s true, but hard to quantify. Let’s skip the argument that trainingimproves the productivity of employees, adding to their through-put and decreasing costly errors. It’s true,easier to quantify, but we don’t need it for our ROI calculation.We’re going to concentrate on the cost of training (now $1,075 per employee per year) and the relationship toturnover costs.8 days.Huh? page 1
  19. 19. $1,075 equates to eight days of replacement costs for an employee who earns sixty-six thousand dollars a year.If an employee who receives training stays eight days longer than she would have without the training, it’s a“push” as they say in Vegas. If they stay a month longer, your return on investment is two-hundred and fiftysix percent. Spend eleven hundred, save twenty-eight hundred. If you stretch out the training and they stayan extra three months (you tricky little devils), your ROI skyrockets to seven-hundred and sixty-seven percent…spend eleven hundred, save eight thousand, two hundred and fifty bucks.Real money. Math rocks.YOU HAVE TO TRAIN YOUR EMPLOYEE SO THEY CAN LEAVE, OR ELSE THEY’LL LEAVE.Got it? Good. page 1
  20. 20. page 20
  21. 21. February 2009Recession Tactics: Training page 21
  22. 22. page 22
  23. 23. page 2
  24. 24. Alternatives to Employer-Provided Training | Jorina FonteleraFebruary 4, 2009During times of recession, workers often look to increase or improve their skills to gain some job security.Many employers, however, are trimming training budgets to save their bottom line.As companies slash business costs to stay afloat, recent studies have found that the training budget is one ofthe first to be cut. Employees and human resources (HR) managers, on the other hand, clamor for trainingduring downturns. Unfortunately for them, many companies don’t share their views.According to a report released last month by enterprise learning and talent management advisory Bersin Associates, the average training expenditures per employee fell 11 percent last year, from $1,202 per learnerin 2007 to $1,075 in 2008. The U.S. corporate training market shrank from $58.5 billion in 2007 to $56.2 billionlast year. This was the biggest drop in a decade, as Workforce Management notes.A survey of 84 corporate and government training professionals late last year by training services firm Expertusand research provider Training Industry showed that they didn’t expect much improvement in 2009. More thantwice as many respondents (48 percent) expected training budgets to decrease rather than increase this year.Only 17 percent anticipated their training budgets to go up. Additionally, 38 percent saw decreases in their2008 training budgets since they were first approved.Trellis Usher-Mays, president of management consulting firm T.R. Ellis Group, tells Human Resource Executivethat the results don’t surprise her. “Most companies are cutting training budgets,” Usher-Mays says. “HRleaders need to fully understand the strategic business objectives of the organization to ensure that trainingdollars get approved — and to make sure those dollars deliver the best return on investment.”It’s not all bad news, she says, adding that “the focus on budget cutting provides an opportunity for HR leadersto highlight the value of training to an organization, particularly when it comes to compliance issues, creating acompetitive advantage and keeping good employees engaged and growing professionally.”The Expertus/Training Industry report found that return-on-investment metrics are not often used to appraisetraining programs.“We recommend that organizations make measuring the value and impact of learning a priority,” DougHarward, chief executive of Training Industry, said in a statement. “This way, training organizations can makebetter-informed budgetary decisions about which training should be supported and which training needs to beimproved.”Human Resource Executive suggests HR professionals leverage their training dollars through e-learning andmentoring programs where employees rely on managers or peers for training.But HR professionals aren’t the only ones struggling with the training budget cuts. Employees looking to shore page 2
  25. 25. up their skill-sets in the face of widespread layoffs find that company-provided training may no longer be anoption and must seek alternatives.The following are a few ideas to consider for acquiring free or inexpensive training outside of work, from ABCNews/Women for Hire, U.S. News World Report and Monster.com.Government Programs • Career One Stop offers on-site and online skills development workshops and training programs, most of which are free. • Career Voyages is a joint venture between the Department of Labor and Department of Education that provides access to apprenticeship and certificate programs for blue-collar and white-collar workers. • Low-income workers can apply for the federal Pell Grant, which provides up to $4,731 for college tuition — enough to cover most costs at community colleges.Nonprofit Organizations • Jewish Vocation Services assists with job training and placement. It has 22 agencies nationwide and works with 40,000 employers and communities to customize training programs to meet the demands of various industries. • Goodwill offers job training in a variety of industries, including health care, information technology, computer programming and more.Online • For people looking solely to develop new skills and who don’t need credit can study the lectures and assignments posted online by professors at MIT, UC-Berkley and dozens of others at OpenCourseWare Consortium. • ITunesU also posts free courses from Stanford, Michigan Tech and other universities.Industry-Specific • The Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute’s PMMI U offers practical, useful educational experiences based on real needs to help individuals and companies upgrade the skills of packaging workers and develop new talent in today’s high-tech packaging industry. • CarQuest runs the CarQuest Technical Institute, which offers ongoing training for auto mechanics, who can train in a shop or through a self-paced series of programs.“Many trade organizations offer training programs to improve skill level within the field and to attract newworkers,” Women for Hire advises, so “check with the leading trade organizations in your current or desiredfield to learn about training opportunities.”ResourcesCorporate Learning Factbook 2009: Benchmarks, Trends and Analysis of the U.S. Corporate Training Marketby Karen O’LeonardBersin Associates, Jan. 9, 2009Training is Taking a Beating in Recession, Studies Findby Ed FrauenheimWorkforce Management, Jan. 26, 2009Measuring Learning as Budgets TightenExpertus, Inc. and Training Industry, Inc., Dec. 3, 2008Downturn Drains Training Budgetsby Scott WestcottHuman Resources Executive, Dec. 30, 2008 page 2
  26. 26. Where to Find Job Retraining Services and Classesby Tory JohnsonABC News, Jan. 2, 2009Advice: Training ProgramsWomen for HireAffordable New Ways to Get Job Skillsby Kim ClarkU.S. News World Report, Jan. 2, 2009Get Automotive Training on the Cheapby Jim McPhersonMonster.com page 2
  27. 27. Professional Development: To train or not to train? | Robin K. CooperFebruary 13, 2009Not even a recession will force Simmons Machine Tool Corp. to cut into its $200,000-a-year budget for in-house employee training and grooming new recruits.“Certainly in a downturn we could say ‘let’s cut our training budget,’” said Simmons President and COO DavidDavis. “We’d much rather cut elsewhere than disrupt the pipeline of new talent,” Davis said.The Menands manufacturer, which builds massive machines used by customers who produce parts for therailroad industry, allocates money every year to train its employees and groom recruits at area colleges andBOCES. The company also spent much of 2008 training staff to make its manufacturing process more efficient.The decision to spend another $200,000 in training and professional development this year makes Simmonspart of a shrinking group. More companies around the country are expected to reduce or eliminate trainingexpenses to survive the economic downturn.“The first thing all companies cut in a down economy is discretionary spending, which is travel and training,”said Doug Harward, CEO of Training Industry Inc. in North Carolina.In 2007, U.S. companies spent a total of $132 billion in training and professional development, according toresearch by Harward’s organization. Spending shrank to $129.2 billion last year, and another 10 percent cut isforecast for this year as companies trim expenses, Harward said. He oversees a company that provides dataand advice to training and professional development businesses around the country.Corporate training, depending on the scope and the duration, can cost businesses anywhere from $1,000 to$2,500 a day, according to Erika Choi, founder of Choice Solutions, an Albany training consulting firm thatspecializes in manufacturing.State and federal grants are available to offset some training costs, but as the economy continues to affectstate budgets, that kind of aid could decline, according to Jeff Lawrence, executive director of the Center forEconomic Growth in Albany, which offers training assistance to area businesses.CEG receives money from the state and federal governments. The organization’s budget is $2.6 million thisyear, down from $4 million in 2008, Lawrence said.State spending cuts are a big concern, he added.He’s also worried about businesses cutting professional development budgets due to fears about the economy.The organization works with 100 companies or so each year.“I think there will be dramatically less training this year, maybe significantly less,” Lawrence said. “If moneyisn’t there, companies just won’t do it.” page 2
  28. 28. That would be bad news for everyone, said Choi.Companies should know that training can cut waste and improve the bottom line. That’s important at a timewhen many sectors realize they may have a hard time increasing sales this year, Choi said.Choi, who is coming off her biggest sales year since she formed the business in 2003, said she also can helpcompanies save money by helping them carry only the amount of inventory they need.“The cost of carrying inventory can impact cash flow and it wastes time for people who are required to manageit.” she said.Some companies might delay some soft skill instruction such as sexual harassment training.“I wouldn’t find that surprising,” she said.Like Simmons, E/One, a Niskayuna-based designer and manufacturer of grinder pumps and other products forsewer systems, has no plans to scale back staff development and training efforts.The company completed a weeklong problem-solving training for engineers last month. Now it’s planning forleadership development instruction in the middle of this month.And there is no indication from its Oregon-based parent, Precision Castparts Corp., that training budgets willbe cut, said Kelley McCart, E/One’s human resource director.The one difference is that E/One now is trying harder to use corporate staff for professional developmentinstead of contracting out. In some cases, corporate staff training can be less expensive, but not always whenyou factor in airfare and hotel costs.Either way, it’s a necessary expense, McCart said.“We are in a talent competition in the U.S.,” McCart said. “If we are not preparing the next generation ofengineers, we could get left behind.” page 2
  29. 29. Economy Taking a Toll on Training, Studies Conclude | Ed FrauenheimFebruary 16, 2009The recession is leading organizations to slash spending on training, two recent studies show.Average training expenditures per employee fell 11 percent in the past year, from $1,202 per learner in 2007 to$1,075 per learner in 2008, according to a report issued in late January by research firm Bersin Associates.Bersin said its figures include training budgets and payroll. Bersin also said the U.S. corporate training marketshrank from $58.5 billion in 2007 to $56.2 billion in 2008, the greatest decline in more than 10 years.Bersin’s report echoes a November study by training services firm Expertus and research provider TrainingIndustry. The survey of 84 corporate and government training professionals found that more than twice asmany respondents expect training-budget decreases rather than increases for 2009.Forty-eight percent expect their budgets to decrease in 2009, up from 41 percent in 2008. Only 17 percentexpect their budgets to increase in 2009. In addition, since 2008 budgets were first approved, far more sawdecreases (38 percent) than increases (11 percent).Bersin president Josh Bersin said organizations funneled money and staff into traditional and “oftennonstrategic” training programs in good years.“When budgets became tight, organizations with a traditional training focus suffered most,” Bersin said in astatement. “Today’s business world demands a combination of formal and informal learning with an emphasison collaboration, knowledge sharing, social networking, coaching and mentoring.”The reports confirm the theory that training is among the first things cut during hard times, which todayinclude a U.S. economy estimated to have contracted at an annual rate of 3.8 percent in the fourth quarter andunemployment that rose to 7.6 percent in January.Trimmed training budgets also come amid a broader reassessment of employee development. In recent years,experts have argued that workers increasingly see career development as vital in an employer. At the sametime, traditional, formal training in classrooms or through computer coursework has come under fire as lesseffective compared to less formal modes of training, including on-the-job learning.Peter Cappelli, management professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, has suggestedthat employees share in the cost of training. In particular, he argues for tuition assistance programs, in whichemployees invest time and effort on classes.The Expertus-Training Industry report found that return-on-investment and business-impact metrics are notoften used to evaluate training programs.“We recommend that organizations make measuring the value and impact of learning a priority,” Doug page 2
  30. 30. Harward, chief executive of Training Industry, said in a statement. “This way, training organizations can makebetter-informed budgetary decisions about which training should be supported and which training needs to beimproved.”In its 2009 Corporate Learning Factbook, Bersin said it found that companies have changed training-programpriorities; moved to coaching, informal learning, collaborative activities and other less-costly training methods;and increased reliance on outsourcing. page 0
  31. 31. Training Products Services | Margery WeinsteinFebruary 26, 2009• IBM released IBM Workforce and Talent Solutions, a talent management system. Key components of IBMWorkforce and Talent Solutions include workforce analytics, e-recruitment, performance management,learning, succession planning, compensation and rewards, workforce deployment and scheduling, employeeportal, collaboration and social networking, and targeted consulting services.• Marshall Goldsmith, author and CEO coach, released a virtual coach program, The Marshall GoldsmithProfessional Success System. It consists of proprietary tools, exercises, and training usually available only toGoldsmith’s clients.• Expertus is launching a solution set called SmartSolutions. Offered as software-as-a-service, the suite ofmodules is designed to help organizations reduce costs, increase revenue, improve efficiency, and achievegreater visibility or heightened adoption of training throughout the organization.• SmartDraw.com is offering a free e-course for business professionals, “Better Beginnings.” Authored by Dr.Carmen Taran of Rexi Media, the course is designed to help speakers and writers grab and maintain theiraudience’s attention.• Select International, a Pittsburgh-based global provider of assessment products, hiring solutions andrecruiting services, released AssureFit, a multi-stage sourcing, recruitment, and assessment solution for hiringmanagers, internal corporate recruiters, human resources professionals, and search firms.• CCH released the “Family and Medical Leave Act, Military Family Leave Final Regulations” guide, covering thechanges to the Family and Medical Leave Act that took effect in January. The reference includes informationabout rule changes, along with explanations of the new rules and how they have changed from priorregulations. page 1
  32. 32. Measuring Informal Learning: Encourage a Learning Culture and Track It! | TomMarch 2009KellyThe evolution of informal learning has been interesting to watch.We’ve witnessed decades of changing landscapes within learningorganizations and, regardless of the latest or greatest learning theoriesand behaviors, people continue to learn – from each other.Though it seems as though the term “informal learning” has found anew life, it’s actually been around for centuries. It has passed the testof time from old world storytelling to hands-on vocational training, butlearning organizations are often resistant to embrace it. “Fill rates”and “percentage of employees trained” are comfortable statistics, butthey lack luster, depth and any suggestion of importance or impact to executive leadership. While we knewfor decades that people learned from each other at the water cooler, on the phone and inside meetings,technology has made the discussion of informal learning a whole new conversation. The question becomes,“We know it happens, but how do we measure it?”Over the course of my career, I have often had to decide what metrics mattered to the executives in theenterprise where I was employed. What truly matters depends on the priorities and the size of the company,but there are a few recommendations that I have made repeatedly related to capturing informal learning andturning it into measurements that count.Create a teaching culture – and make it measurable! An organization whose people are learning at the pace of change is going to be more successful, in a faster timeframe, than an organization that cannot keep up. With a continually changing marketplace, new products and cutting-edge technologies that drive productivity or sales, having up-to-date employees is critical to an organization’s success. To create such a learning organization, you have to build a teaching culture. A teaching culture is one that believes in recognizing and rewarding people for sharing how they achieve, what they know, how they learned it, and where they find information. An organization that fosters this culture will grow faster and make fewer mistakes than an organization that does not. An enterprise does not need one best sales person, they need dozens or hundreds or thousands who understand that they are not competing page 2
  33. 33. against each other, but rather, against other companies. The same applies to Engineering, Support, and eachfunctional job in the company: you need an army of great people. High potential “stars” and other successfulpeople empowering their peers is a real winning strategy.When discussing measurement – harness this culture and use tools that provide reliable use data. We’lldiscuss those techniques below.Encourage employees to create content based on their successes (and even failures).I have recommended decentralizing content creation for almost 20 years, but these days it is so easy! Contentcreation tools finally exist that make it easy for anyone who is an expert to share knowledge. They work wellfor anyone who has experienced some success and wants to share it with partners/colleagues/employeeslooking for a new or different way to be successful.With wikis, blogs, audio-over-slides, video, and social networking tools, learning organizations can managepublic forums where knowledge is openly shared. Peer to peer teaching tools require training organizations togive up some control of the content creation process, but these tools also increase the accessibility and speedby which content can be updated or corrected.Professionals want to learn tips, tricks, and techniques from successful peers in their community. They don’treally want to listen to scripted “talent”, or to professional trainers. Those tips and tricks should be brief,focused knowledge nuggets that are two, five, seven or 10 minutes long. Short, direct, and specific answers orcoaching comments that teach professionals how to be successful, how to approach a situation or customer,address different vertical markets, or solve any other narrow problem are immensely impactful. They are alsoeasily searched within a database and are much more easily updated and replaced than courses, white papersor one-hour video segments. Decentralize content creation and you will capitalize on a scalable formula ofsuccessful informal learning.The beauty of wikis, blogs, message boards and other knowledge-sharing tools is the ability to monitor, trackand measure their success. How many people are searching for specific topics? How many best practices arebeing shared and how are improvements being realized in that area? What questions are prevalent that canbe addressed company-wide and what are the results once they are answered? It’s as if we’ve recorded watercooler conversations, put them in one place and have the ability to effectively respond to questions raised.Measure and report the right metrics.I am fond of this back-to-basics reminder. There are only three reasons for companies to have a trainingfunction: Drive enterprise revenues up. Increase employee productivity.· Increase customer satisfaction and loyalty.If you cannot show that kind of impact, they are likely the wrong metrics. When tracking informal learning,how are people communicating about these objectives? How are people learning from others and becomingmore productive? Where are people learning tricks that save time and money? What best practices are beingshared about how to keep customers happy? When you can correlate informal learning activities with solidmetrics that support these objectives, you will have the attention of executives.ResearchExpertus and Training industry, Inc. recently announced the findings from their joint November 2008 study,“Measuring Learning as Budgets Tighten.” The survey was completed by 84 corporate and government trainingprofessionals in organizations with varying sizes throughout 19 industries. page
  34. 34. The study had many interesting findings, including: More than twice as many organizations’ budgets went down than up in 2008. During 2008 (through early November), 38 percent reported training budget decreases compared with only 11 percent who reported increases. About half of the budgets remained the same. Fewer learning leaders expect budgets to increase in 2009. Only 17 percent reported budget increases from 2008 to 2009 compared with 31 percent who reported budget increases from 2007 to 2008. 2009 budgets changes are more likely flat or lower. More difficult-to-collect metrics are used less often. Return on investment and other types of business impact metrics, which are arguably the most difficult to calculate, are used the least often – by one in four respondents or less. Conversely, simple metrics such as numbers of course completions and registrations are among the most often used.Since far more training budgets are decreasing than increasing in 2009, there is heightened importancein demonstrating the impact of training spending through effective measurements. There are traditionalmeasurement tools that should be reevaluated and updated, but it also opens up the discussion for measuringinformal learning. It can even be less expensive than traditional training if you encourage people to talk, shareand ask questions.Everything can be tracked in some shape or form, but measurement can be perplexing. When framing yourthoughts around how to implement measurement techniques, here is my advice.My “Top Five” Thoughts on Measurement 1. Look beyond formal training sources for your impact metrics. Informal training sources have become more important than ever before. 2. Do not settle for easy metrics, they are of little interest and no real value beyond annual funding discussions. The harder the data is to gather is generally directly related to its relevance. 3. Focus on macro numbers and trend lines, not individual (micro) employee statistics. For example, is there a relationship between how many salespeople/partners view training materials before product sales take off? 4. Map trends of training usage and timing with changes in sales; internally and through channel partners. Finding correlations between training trends and selling – it’s a holy grail. 5. Find data showing impact on or alignment with your enterprise priorities. What are your training products doing to grow revenues? Improve customer satisfaction? Increase employee productivity?To recap, informal training is rapidly overtaking “formal” training in its importance to the learner community,so it is time for us to embrace and leverage that capability. I highly recommend some paradigm shifts withinorganizations that are still using old ways of learning and traditional measurement techniques.If I were to share some simple “take-and-go” final thoughts, it would be to (1) build a learning organizationand a teaching culture, (2) decentralize your content creation – maximize the new ways of information sharing– and (3) centralize content deployment; focus on processes that allow access to new success metrics thatevidence alignment with and impact on enterprise goals. page
  35. 35. March 16, 2009Leading VendorsHere are some of the leading vendors that provide outsourced learning offerings, with information on theircompanies provided from their Web sites.AccentureAccenture Learning BPO Services is a comprehensive learning outsourcing offering -- backed by deepconsulting and technology capabilities -- that helps organizations drive measurable improvements in businessperformance from their learning and talent management investments.ACSACS Learning Services provides end-to-end learning outsourcing services to companies that are integral toa comprehensive HR, talent management or learning process outsourcing (LPO) strategy, including learningassessment services, curriculum design and content development services as well as complete learning processoutsource services and learning technology services.ConvergysConvergys fully integrates comprehensive learning services into broader HR BPO services. Solutions includealignment and governance; content development and sourcing; learning delivery; administration andoperations; reporting and analytics; and learning diagnostic.ExpertusFrom global LMS consolidation to Web 2.0 customer training portals -- and from learning performancedashboards to rapid e-learning development for worldwide product rollouts -- Expertus helps manage learning.It promises to deliver measurable business impact -- with management strategies, outsourcing services andtechnology-rich solutions that optimize learning efficiency and effectiveness.General PhysicsGP is a global performance improvement company that offers innovative and knowledgeable training,consulting, and business improvement services customized to meet specific needs. It has more than 40 yearsof leadership in training, consulting, and engineering services, and commits to bringing proven processes, bestpractices and lessons learned to bring greater success to organizations.GeoLearningGeoLearning is a leading provider of managed learning services, and on-demand performance and learningplatforms. Its on-demand learning and performance management products and services are designed toleverage the power of the Internet to accelerate the critical business processes within an organization,centrally manage human capital and knowledge acquisition, and dramatically increase their capacity to win acompetitive advantage in the marketplace.IBM Learning SolutionsIBM learning solutions are designed to inspire and equip employees to improve their performance, skills and page
  36. 36. knowledge for results. Consulting services and solutions include learning-content development , learning-management technology, learning infrastructure and hosting, learning outsourcing and learning delivery.IntrepidIntrepid is a global provider of award-winning learning solutions. In addition to consulting, technology andmanaged services, it offers packaged holistic learning solutions that can be rapidly tailored to support learnerpreferences and business goals worldwide. It collaborates with clients to create and sustain education andtraining programs that deliver measurable business results.NIITNIIT is a leading global talent development corporation, building skilled manpower pools for global industryrequirements. The company offers learning solutions to Individuals, enterprises and Institutions across 40countries. Research-based innovation, a key driver at NIIT, is used to develop programs and curricula that usecutting-edge instructional design methodologies and training delivery.Raytheon Professional ServicesRaytheon Professional Services applies a broad range of award-winning training capabilities on a global scaleto help organizations redesign how they train their employees, customers and partners. It also manages theirtraining over the long term. It all aims at improving the performance of the learner while reducing total costof ownership and delivering other measurable benefits. Its experience and insights span a wide variety ofcommercial industries, government agencies, languages, cultures and skill sets.RWDRWD’s broad capabilities and experience in learning services is designed to offer organizations an added edge,while providing solutions that are both cost-effective and designed to meet the specific learning requirementsof employees. It helps develop the optimal learning solution from strategic planning to implementation andpost-launch management. The scalable spectrum of programs, which range from soft skills to highly technicaltraining initiatives, are designed to reach organization-wide learning while recognizing the particular needs ofindividual corporate cultures and organizational models.Thanks to Bersin Associates for their help in putting this list together. page
  37. 37. March 18, 2009Learning Executive Think Tank Releases New White Paper: “5 Ways to Survive Thrive in a Troubled Economy”Expertus (www.expertus.com) today announced the release of a new white paper summarizing the discussionamong a handful of learning leaders during the Learning Executive Think Tank’s second virtual meeting. Thewhite paper, “5 Ways to Help Your Training Organization Survive and Thrive in a Troubled Economy,” is availableat http://www.trainingefficiency.com/system/files/WP_5-Ways-Training-Organizations-Survive-in-a-Troubled-Economy.pdf.Expertus, a global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning, has found that, althoughmany organizations are taking cover and freezing their activities as a result of economic hardship, manylearning executives now see promise and opportunities.According to the white paper, the emergent winners use recessionary times to innovate and widen the gapbetween themselves and their competition. While many companies slash payrolls, place product developmenton hold, and take a wait-and-see position in their markets, the true ‘winners’ strategically increase productivityand prepare to come out ahead when the good times return. Forward-thinking companies who take thisposition are therefore required to keep the training engine running at full speed.The roundtable group, which included learning leaders from a broad spectrum of businesses, comparedinsights on key issues facing the industry and shared ideas about not only surviving, but thriving in this tougheconomy.The white paper states, “The interesting dichotomy of the current business climate is that it’s creating anincreased demand for training. Organizations are making hard decisions about what stays and what goes. Theyare making sure that at the end of this recession, their learning organization and the company is stronger andbetter than it was before.”When asked how to endure and advance during these tough times, the following advice surfaced: Create a Teaching Culture - One participant from the knowledge service industry noted that this is an extremely effective and economical method for training the workforce. Shift to Virtual and e-Learning - Roundtable participants earmarked e-learning as a critical training tool in a cost-conscious business climate, offering an opportunity to create programs that ensure excellence without a loss of productivity. Encourage and Integrate Informal and Collaborative Learning - Borrowing from successful social media technology, the use of blogs, webinars, wikis, white papers, and peer-to-peer training helps to ensure that organizations have access to the training they need at any given moment. Re-negotiate Contracts with Vendors - Keeping current partners is much easier and economical than finding new ones, but many roundtable participants agreed that this should to be done with caution. Align, Prioritize and Cut - Understand your objectives, align training with the business, and reduce head count intelligently. page
  38. 38. Read the full report at: http://www.trainingefficiency.com/system/files/WP_5-Ways-Training-Organizations-Survive-in-a-Troubled-Economy.pdf.Expertus also recently released a related white paper entitled “Top 5 Ways to Ready Your TrainingOrganization for a Troubled Economy,” available at www.trainingefficiency.com. Five additional roundtablediscussions are planned for 2009. To find the latest results from each roundtable discussion, visit http://www.trainingefficiency.com. To inquire about participating in a roundtable, contact Gordon Johnson at gordonj@expertus.com. For information on Expertus, visit www.expertus.com or call Mike Murrell at 803-802-9971.About ExpertusExpertus is the leading global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning. For more than a decade, the firm’s500+ learning management professionals have defined and implemented plans, processes and technologies that transform trainingorganizations creating measurable value for the world’s most successful corporations. Clients include ADP, Cisco, ConocoPhillips,EMC, Honeywell and Lockheed Martin. Every day at these and other companies, more than a million employees, customers andbusiness partners are educated as a result of Expertus’ innovative business strategies, outsourcing services and technology-richsolutions.Based in Silicon Valley, Expertus serves its clients from offices in the US, UK and India. For more information, visit www.expertus.com,or call toll-free 1-877-827-8160. page
  39. 39. March 24, 2009Expertus Named a “Top 20 Training Outsourcing Company” for 3rd Consecutive YearExpertus (www.expertus.com), a global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning,today announced that it has again been named one of Training Outsourcing, Inc.’s “Top 20 Companies in theTraining Outsourcing Industry.” This is the third year that Expertus has been selected for the influential list,and the fourth year the firm has been honored by Training Industry, Inc. In 2006, Expertus was selected as anEmerging Outsourcing Leader.“It has become a tradition to watch for this coveted announcement and celebrate our place among suchexceptional companies,” said Ramesh Ramani, Founder and CEO of Expertus. “The expanding selection criteriacorrelates with the direction of the industry, and we are pleased that our products, services and customersillustrate our continual growth, as well.”Each year since 2004, Training Industry, Inc. has assessed the leading companies in the training industry todetermine those best suited for world-class outsourcing engagements. This year, they contacted over 500companies to assess their expertise, experience and capabilities.The evaluation criteria include corporate competencies in the 26 business processes identified in TrainingIndustry, Inc.’s Training Process Framework. They looked at the marketing strategy of each company todetermine if training outsourcing was considered a core service in a firm’s business model, and evaluated thestrength of each company’s major clients.“The criteria used for selecting the ‘Top 20’ reflects the expanded role outsourced learning services play in thebusiness strategy of major corporations,” said Jim Hanlin, Chief Marketing Officer of Training Industry, Inc. “Westress the importance of innovative methods in learning analytics and evaluation methods used to assess theimpact of learning on business performance, and are pleased to publicly announce the organizations that standout as innovators.”Expertus offers learning services, strategies and solutions to organizations of all sizes focused on aligningtraining with business objectives. Services include, but are not limited to, learning management consulting,SmartSourcingTM outsourcing services, and learning technology services. Some recently retained clientsinclude Autodesk, Baker Petrolite and SuperValue. Visit www.expertus.com for full explanations of Expertus’suite of offerings.For details on Training Outsourcing, Inc.’s Top 20 list, go to: http://trainingoutsourcing.com. For moreinformation on Expertus, visit http://www.expertus.com or call 1-877-827-8160.About ExpertusExpertus is the leading global provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning. For more than a decade, the firm’s500+ learning management professionals have defined and implemented plans, processes and technologies that transform trainingorganizations creating measurable value for the world’s most successful corporations. Clients include ADP, Cisco, ConocoPhillips, EMC,Honeywell and Lockheed Martin. Every day at these and other companies, more than a million employees, customers and businesspartners are educated as a result of Expertus’ innovative business strategies, outsourcing services and technology-rich solutions.Based in Silicon Valley, Expertus serves its clients from offices in the US, UK and India. For more information, visit www.expertus.com,or call toll-free 1-877-827-8160. page
  40. 40. March 25, 2009SALT Industry News and AnnouncementsReports, White Papers and Case StudiesExpertus Releases White PaperMarch 18, 2009 - Expertus announced the release of a new white paper summarizing the discussion among ahandful of learning leaders during the Learning Executive Think Tank’s second virtual meeting, “5 Ways to HelpYour Training Organization Survive and Thrive in a Troubled Economy.” The roundtable group, which includedlearning leaders from a broad spectrum of businesses, compared insights on key issues facing the industry andshared ideas about not only surviving, but thriving in this tough economy. ... More page 0
  41. 41. April 2009Engagement | David AquinoLearning, Training Development: A Short-Term Savior to Maintain Employee page 1
  42. 42. page 2
  43. 43. Appeared in print and onlineApril 22, 2009Outsource Learning Operations With ConfidenceExpertus, a provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning, released a white paper, “A Guideto Successful SmartSourcing: Learning Operations on a Shrinking Budget, 7 Ways to Ensure You Achieve Morewith Less.”Recently named a Top 20 learning outsourcing provider by Training Outsourcing Inc., Expertus sharesapplicable tips and tools for learning executives who are researching outsourcing as a cost-saving option.“This white paper discusses the concept of SmartSourcing: how to strike a good balance in the management ofyour training operations,” said Ramesh Ramani, founder and CEO of Expertus. “We view intelligent outsourcingas picking vendor partners who enhance your training organization by saving money and adding value.”The white paper outlines the top eight activities for outsourcing learning operations based on which activitieshave the biggest potential for improving operational efficiency and increasing service levels. They include:1. Training administration2. Help-desk services3. Facilities and resource management4. Registration management5. Vendor management6. Catalog management7. Training materials fulfillment8. Training program marketingAlso outlined are three different types of outsourcing organizations, explaining the benefits and pitfalls of bodyshops and business process outsourcers (BPOs) with learning industry expertise. The white paper offers a guideto successful SmartSourcing and an outline of what to investigate when researching potential partners. page
  44. 44. April 22, 2009Outsource Learning Operations With ConfidenceExpertus, a provider of services that optimize the business impact of learning, released a white paper, “A Guideto Successful SmartSourcing: Learning Operations on a Shrinking Budget, 7 Ways to Ensure You Achieve Morewith Less.”Recently named a Top 20 learning outsourcing provider by Training Outsourcing Inc., Expertus sharesapplicable tips and tools for learning executives who are researching outsourcing as a cost-saving option.“This white paper discusses the concept of SmartSourcing: how to strike a good balance in the management ofyour training operations,” said Ramesh Ramani, founder and CEO of Expertus. “We view intelligent outsourcingas picking vendor partners who enhance your training organization by saving money and adding value.”The white paper outlines the top eight activities for outsourcing learning operations based on which activitieshave the biggest potential for improving operational efficiency and increasing service levels. They include:1. Training administration2. Help-desk services3. Facilities and resource management4. Registration management5. Vendor management6. Catalog management7. Training materials fulfillment8. Training program marketingAlso outlined are three different types of outsourcing organizations, explaining the benefits and pitfalls of bodyshops and business process outsourcers (BPOs) with learning industry expertise. The white paper offers a guideto successful SmartSourcing and an outline of what to investigate when researching potential partners. page
  45. 45. April 22, 2009SALT Industry News and AnnouncementsReports, White Papers and Case StudiesNew Expertus White Paper Discusses How to Outsource Learning OperationsApril 21, 2009 - Expertus released a white paper, “A Guide to Successful SmartSourcing: Learning Operationson a Shrinking Budget, 7 Ways to Ensure You Achieve More with Less” The white paper discusses the conceptof SmartSourcing – how to strike a good balance in the management of your training operations. The whitepaper outlines the top eight activities for outsourcing learning operations, based on which activities have thebiggest potential for improving operational efficiency and increasing service levels. ... More page
  46. 46. States consolidate on learning management | David RathsMay 1, 2009Like you were reinventing the wheel. That’s what it sometimes felt like to work in training for theCommonwealth of Virginia five years ago, according to Brooke Schepker, Virginia’s Knowledge Center systemsadministrator.When the governor would put out a new executive order on a topic such as business continuity orcybersecurity, agencies would occasionally share CDs they had created. But more often each agency wouldspend the time and resources to create its own training materials, which it would host on its own learningmanagement system (LMS). Often those systems were not compatible and couldn’t share content.“We used to spend time and money in many duplications of effort,” Schepker says.But those days are over. An LMS consolidation project instigated by eight of the largest state agencies led tothe development of the Commonwealth of Virginia Knowledge Center, which Schepker says has increasedefficiency, saved the Commonwealth money and allowed trainers to focus on creating better content.The Knowledge Center Web site presents a visual metaphor of a Campus Map, with buildings that house onlinefunctions such as administration and a lecture hall. Schepker calls it a hub-and-spoke system, in which agencytraining staffers retain control over look and feel, and learning modules are appropriate for their employees,but the system uses one centralized database, and the online content and employee training records are easilysharable.“We call it a knowledge center rather than an LMS because we like to stress that we have the ability to housecontent for agencies in their own libraries in the system,” Schepker explains. “They can upload internaldocumentation or presentations in their own agency knowledge center.”Virginia also encourages city and county governments to utilize the site, and now has 300,000 people using it.The consolidation of learning management systems is an ongoing trend in the corporate landscape, and as withother IT movements, state and local government enterprises are following private-sector entities in seekingimproved content integration and the centralization of learner data.A late 2006 survey by consulting firms Expertus and TrainingOutsourcing.com found that more than 25 percentof 249 corporate respondents used multiple learning management systems within their organizations, andmore than 75 percent of those organizations planned to consolidate. Perhaps surprisingly, only 40 percentsaid reducing costs was a key driver, while centralizing data about learners, integrating content and improvingintegration with other applications such as enterprise resource planning all were top factors.Roy Haythorn, VP of operations for Meridian Knowledge Solutions, says most large government organizationshave plenty of inefficiencies to address. “Many state governments have 40 different learning managementsystems in place, with individual maintenance contracts on each, and they’re not able to share content. Sothey are creating good online content, but other agencies can’t easily share it.” page
  47. 47. LMS vendor Meridian has worked with many state governments, including Virginia, on consolidations. “Thechallenge is to find a champion to take the lead to make it happen,” Haythorn says. “It works best if you can getthe CIO of a state to herd the cats and convince agency leaders to agree to work together.”Cost savings in VirginiaAlthough the Virginia Knowledge Center started in 2005 with a steering committee from eight large agencies,other department leaders soon jumped on the bandwagon. It has since grown to 74 agencies, and 20 more areconsidering it.Some agencies were paying $20,000 for annual hosting fees for their own LMS, which provided nocommunication with those of other agencies. Now they pay as little as $800 a year in hosting fees for access tothe centralized LMS, Schepker says. In fact, the state social services agency was paying $140,000 a year for itsown LMS, and now pays only $1,000 in hosting fees, she adds.“Whenever agencies work together on a purchase, the result is going to be cost savings,” Schepker says. “Wecan have one of me instead of 70.”The system has had other benefits, according to Schepker, including automating reporting. Each state agencyhas to file quarterly training metrics figures with the Department of Human Resource Management. In thepast, that might have been sent as a spreadsheet file or hard-copy printouts. Now most of the data is alreadyin the Knowledge Center system. A feature called “learning events” allows administrators to enter informationabout training events that take place outside the Knowledge Center, such as a certification an employee hasearned through classroom training.Schepker says that training staff members now have more time to create compelling content. She remembersan old conflict-of-interest training module that was just a video of a talking head. “It was awful and peopledreaded having to go sit in a room and watch it,” she recalls. With time freed up from administrative tasks,trainers have converted the video into an interactive e-learning piece. “Now people can complete it at theirleisure,” Schepker says, “and users like it much better.”‘Virtual LMS’ in public healthMany states are finding it valuable to share public health training materials across agencies and stateboundaries, and now state governments are expanding their outreach to county public health workers. Forinstance, the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Public Health Practice has launched NY LearnsPublic Health, an LMS designed to facilitate the tracking of learners, courses and competencies for state andlocal public health workers.“We do not manage all the public health training in the state by any means,” says Thomas Reizes, learningmanagement system global administrator, “but we can help take training efforts that were sometimesdisjointed, isolated and separate, and unite some of them with a common platform.”Reizes describes the project as allowing local health agencies to set up their own ‘virtual LMS’ to manage andcoordinate the training their staffs receive. New York state is offering free access to the system to local publichealth agencies. Designed by the Center for Advancement of Distance Education at the University of Illinois atChicago’s School of Public Health, the LMS allows users to search a database of online and classroom courses,register for sections, complete quizzes and track course completion. It also includes a self-assessment tool tohelp users find training opportunities relevant to their job roles.Last year, a pilot project with 29 agencies, including local public health departments, helped develop a catalogof almost 300 courses. “Now we are training those administrators who want to use it to start tracking theirown employees’ training,” Reizes says. page

×