Ecotech Institute 2011 Clipbook

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An all-in-one document showcasing the top media placements and PR efforts for the year.

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Ecotech Institute 2011 Clipbook

  1. 1. Ecotech Institute Media Presence 2011
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary................................................................................................page 4 to 19February............................................................................................... page 20 to 30March...................................................................................................page 31 to 49April......................................................................................................page 50 to 52May.......................................................................................................page 53 to 65June......................................................................................................page 66 to 75 page 76 and 77July........................................................................................................August..................................................................................................page 78 to 87September.......................................................................................... page 88 to 95October.............................................................................................. page 96 to 111November........................................................................................... page 112 to 121December......................................................................................... page 122 to 129
  3. 3. Virginia College parent company reports on ‘zero-client’ experiment | Kyle CriderJanuary 1, 2011When Education Corporation of America (ECA, the operator of Virginia College and other more specializedschools) decided it wanted to leverage the virtualization of its central data center, it chose its new Ecotechcampus in Denver to act as incubator for a cutting-edge zero-client experiment. Ecotech Institute is the firstand only college entirely focused on preparing graduates for careers in the rapidly growing fields of renewableenergy, sustainable design, and energy efficiency. A zero client, as ECA defines it, is a small device that has nofunction or hardware other than what is necessary to connect to a remote server.In addition to minimizing costs, zero-client technology seemed in line with ECA’s business model, includingoperating with as small a corporate footprint—in this case, warm bodies, not greenhouse gases—as possible.It was a natural progression from such best IT practices as voice over IP, which allow a single data cable to bepulled, rather than pulling separate lines for phone and data.ECA chose VDI (now VMware) View for the Ecotech experiment, and like all “bleeding-edge” technology theimplementation involved a lot of hard work and a lot of long weekends. “There were certain speed bumps wehad to overcome,” explains Lloyd Weaver, VP for Corporate IT. While plenty of organizations were using View,very few, if any, were utilizing it to the full extent of ECA’s Ecotech experiment.The Ecotech deployment was completed in late January 2010. The final results were impressive, by most anymetric. For example, ECA saved approximately $500 per workstation by utilizing zero-client terminals ratherthan desktops. The servers to drive this technology do cost a bit more than traditional servers, but the othersavings result in a short payback period. There were indirect savings as well: Since zero clients don’t even havea fan, this loss of heat load allowed for air conditioning savings in all Ecotech labs. Indeed, when energy savingswere calculated, a conservative estimate was that Ecotech zero-client technology was saving the equivalentenergy of 62 microwave ovens running 12 hours a day, 5 days a week, 52 weeks a year!Furthermore, zero-client technology solves a number of top-down and bottom-up IT headaches, fromconsistency through security. The nightmare of constantly updating individual workstations to guard againstvirus introduction via student USB drives just fades quietly away.The Ecotech incubator experiment went so well—and proved so surprisingly green—that ECA plans toimplement zero-client technology at its new Virginia College campuses scheduled to open in 2011. “ECA hasan awareness of—and sensitivity to—environmental matters,” explains Ron Maillette, who functions as ECA’sCIO and CSO2 (Corporate Security Officer and Corporate Sustainability Officer). “We want to ‘walk the talk’ ofEcotech here at HQ and at our other campuses.”Despite its name, even “zero” client technology eventually produces the dreaded specter of e-waste. However,ECA has solved that problem by partnering with Intercon, a U.S. Department of Defense-certified data-safe,zero-landfill electronics recycler. page
  4. 4. January 9, 2011Ecotech Institute Grand OpeningEcotech’s grand opening was featured on the 10 p.m. news on January 9.See flash drive for full video. page
  5. 5. January 13, 2011Ecotech Institute Grand OpeningEcotech’s grand opening was featured on the 9 p.m. news on January 13, and the 5 a.m. news onJanuary 14.See flash drive for full video. page
  6. 6. **Press release, which had 35 pick-ups, including the three cited here.**January 13, 2011Envision Solar Designs, Installs Solar Parking Project At Ecotech InstituteEnvision Solar International, Inc. (OTCBB: EVSI), a leading sustainable infrastructure designer and developer,announces the design and installation of its Solar Tree® parking structures at the new Ecotech Institute, thefirst and only college entirely focused on renewable energy, sustainable design and energy efficiency. SunRenuSolar, LLC chose Envision Solar for the project. Its Solar Trees will create renewable solar energy to offset theelectricity costs for the Institute in its Aurora, Colo. parking lot.Envision Solar’s solar parking arrays provide both shade and clean electricity for their owners. The highlyarchitected and engineered designs are ideal for parking structures and surface lots, and environments thatprefer competitively priced clean renewable energy. Additionally, they create added value for the property inthe form of covered parking. The company designs and installs its Solar Trees and Solar Groves™ for a widerange of environments, including corporate campuses, commercial office buildings, light industrial facilities,shopping malls, restaurants, government buildings, schools, universities and hospitals.“Parking lots and parking structures provide a tremendous opportunity for solar deployment, and we arepleased to have been selected by SunRenu Solar for this exciting project,” said Envision Solar PresidentDesmond Wheatley. “Our leading designs will be an ideal catalyst for the students at this innovative learningcenter, and we are proud to have been chosen as a prime example of the right way to design and deploy solarparking arrays.”Envision Solar has a significant portfolio of solar deployments at educational establishments. The Solar Groveparking structure at UC San Diego, designed by the company’s founder Robert Noble, has won numerousawards for architectural and engineering excellence.“At SunRenu Solar and SunRenu Solar Contractors, we have a passion for the solar business and incorporateinnovative solar power system design, construction, and solar production monitoring to implement solarsolutions with the highest return on investment,” said SunRenu Managing Member John McDonnell. “EnvisionSolar is the obvious choice for deployments where a highly architected solution and superior installation isrequired. Envision Solar’s portfolio of high quality projects speaks for itself, and we look forward to doing manymore projects with the company.” The Ecotech Institute prepares students for careers in fields such as solar power, wind turbine technology,sustainable interior design, environmental paralegal, and the environmental jobs of the new green economy.The Institute selected SunRenu Solar because of the creative and innovative approach that the company bringsto turn-key solar deployments.For more information about Envision Solar or any of its Solar Tree designs and structures, visit www.envisionsolar.com. page
  7. 7. January 14, 2011Ecotech Institute Grand OpeningEcotech’s grand opening was featured on the 7 a.m. news on January 14.See flash drive for full video. page
  8. 8. January 15, 2011Ecotech’s Impressive New Digs in AuroraCareer college now home to wind turbines, solar panels, car charging stations, solar trees, hi-tech labs andmoreStudents at Ecotech Institute are now taking classes in its freshly minted facility at 1400 South Abilene Streetin Aurora. The school has transformed a vacant, large-footprint building into a progressive campus focused oneducating future participants in the renewable energy and sustainability industries.The institution set up shop in Denver last spring, with its first round of classes in July taking place in atemporary building. Almost 200 students started the third quarter last week in the new facility. It features 30classrooms, 12 state-of-the-art computer and science labs (e.g. electrical, wiring, solar, wind safety, controlsand environmental science), studios, student and faculty lounges, a library, and a variety of other amenities.In addition, throughout the building can be found energy and resource savings, including: • Twelve polycrystalline rooftop photovoltaic solar panels with a system capacity of 2.8 kilowatts. • Integral thin solar technologies embedded into the glass of the front building canopy — a system with a capacity of 9.4 kilowatts. • Eight small wind turbines mounted on the roof to generate up to 4.8 kilowatts of electricity. • A Vertical Axis wind turbine that can generate a total capacity of 4 kilowatts. • Two solar trees, each providing 16.9 kilowatts of electricity, that will generate over 50,000 kilowatt hours per year of electricity. • Energy efficient lighting that will reduce energy consumption by 30 percent below standard lighting energy levels. • Water sense, low-flow fixtures in lavatories. • Motion sensors and a programmed schedule to limit lighting in unoccupied rooms.“Beginning courses in our new building marks a tremendous milestone in our evolving growth,” says MichaelSeifert, president of Ecotech Institute. “This campus embraces what we are most passionate about: access toexceptional education and commitment to the environment.”“Green jobs are in demand in Colorado and around the country and we are pleased to provide top-notch,hands-on education that will deliver graduates to companies that are leading the cleantech sector,” Seifertadded.Ecotech Institute, which is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, offersseven highly practical degree programs and one certificate program that provide graduates with skills that arehighly valued by today’s renewable energy employers. The programs include: • Electrical Engineering Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Energy and Environmental Paralegal, Associate of Applied Science • Energy Efficiency, Associate of Applied Science • Environmental Technology, Associate of Applied Science page
  9. 9. • Renewable Energy Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Solar Energy Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Sustainable Interior Design, Certificate Program • Wind Energy Technology, Associate of Applied ScienceVisit the website to learn more. Applications are being accepted now, and financial assistance is available forthose who qualify. page 10
  10. 10. Ecotech Institute opens its doors | Adam GoldsteinJanuary 17, 2011 A new trade school focused entirely on renewable energy, sustainable design and “green” technology welcomed about 200 students to its new, 62,000-square-foot campus in Aurora this week. Less than a year after the Ecotech Institute opened its first classes in a temporary facility off East Iliff Avenue, officials welcomed new and returning students to its permanent home at 1400 S. Abilene St. Classes started Monday at the campus near East Mississippi Avenue and Interstate 225, a building that boasts photovoltaicsolar panels and wind turbines on the roof, “solar trees” in the parking lot and motion-triggered lightingsystems in the classrooms.According to faculty, staff and administrators from Ecotech, the first school devoted entirely to preparingstudents for “green” trades, such features hint at the school’s bigger mission.“The thought is that this will be the hub where we fine tunethe program,” said Glenn Wilson, Ecotech’s academic dean.“There is no college like this that prepares (students) forthese types of technical jobs in the clean energy field.”The school’s two-year degree program offers associatedegrees in electrical engineering technology, energy andenvironmental paralegal, energy efficiency, environmentaltechnology, renewable energy technology, solar energytechnology and wind energy technology, as well as acertificate program in sustainable interior design. Ecotech’sfaculty total about 70, instructors that are required to hold amaster’s degree.The tuition runs at about $350 per credit hour, and the specialized degree programs encompass 96 credithours for completion.The school’s general education requirements include math, science, English and computer technology courses.“When we talk to the people hiring the students, we want them to have a good understanding of the physics,the chemistry, the geography and everything that’s behind the science. That’s why we have general eds,” 11 page
  11. 11. Wilson said. “Then we have classes that are related to core manufacturing and installing. We have basicelectricity, we have safety, digital electronics ... so they understand the equipment in a generic sort of way.”Ecotech’s parent company, Alabama-based Education Corporation of America, also operates Virginia College,Culinard: The Culinary Institute of Virginia and the Golf Academy of America. In total, the ECA enrolls anestimated 19,000 students.When officials first announced plans for Ecotech last year, they said enrollment at the Aurora school couldrange between 700 and 1,200. Now in its third quarter, the trade school is still building its attendancenumbers, Wilson said. About 75 new students started classes at the school this week, while more than 100returning students moved to classes in the new facility.Still, Ecotech officials say the new building can accommodate more than 1,000 students, a number they’rehoping to eventually surpass. Satellite campuses could be part of the school’s future, officials said, but theAurora facility will stand as the model for the school’s operations and curriculum.“One of the key issues is how we built the facility,” said Ecotech President Michael Seifert. “We have the solartrees, we have a major wind turbine; that’s a key issue. We wanted to make sure that as we teach these futureemployees, that we walk the talk. I think that’s very important.” page 12
  12. 12. **Press release, which had seven pick-ups, including the two cited here.**January 19, 2011Ecotech Institute Offers Cutting-Edge Electrical Engineering Technology ProgramEcotech Institute, the first and only college focused entirely on preparing America’s workforce for alternative energycareers in renewable energy and sustainable design, today announced growing demand for its Electrical EngineeringTechnology Program. As research continues to underscore the importance of an overhauled power sector, relatedjob skills will be critical and Ecotech’s program is in the forefront for career training.Ecotech Institute, which is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, launchedin Denver, Colorado in April 2010 with seven highly practical renewal energy degree programs and one certificateprogram that provide graduates with skills that are valued by today’s alternative renewable energy employers.According to The 21st Century Electric Utility: Positioning for a Low-Carbon Future, a Ceres Report authored byNavigant Consulting, “The successful 21st century electric utility company will be very different from the utility ofthe 20th century. To remain competitive, today’s utility must respond to the risks and opportunities from climatechange, carbon costs, volatile fuel prices, emerging clean technologies, expanding energy efficiency programs,increasing customer expectations and competing third party energy providers. Responding to these challenges willrequire new core competencies and revised business models for U.S. utilities.”“Ecotech’s Electrical Engineering Technology Program is in high demand for its ability to prepare graduates forcareers that require highly technical knowledge in the new energy economy,” says Alison Wise, Director of CareerServices at Ecotech Institute. “For example, as the aging grid moves toward Smart Grid technologies, our studentswill have the knowledge base to sustain lifelong careers in this changing industry.”This program prepares students for alternative energy careers while focused on the fundamentals of electricalengineering. Ecotech’s state-of-the-art laboratories and facilities allow students the opportunity to apply theory andgraduates will be well prepared to become electrical engineering technicians.The Electrical Engineering Technology Associate degree requires 96 credit hours of education. Upon successfulcompletion of this program, students should be able to: • Apply electrical and electronic theory and related knowledge to design, build, repair, calibrate, and modify electrical components, circuitry, controls, and machinery; • Perform diagnostic electrical analysis; • Meet industry standards within the electrical engineering field; • Apply safety principles; and • Coordinate a successful job search.Ecotech Institute also offers the following programs: • Energy Efficiency Program, Associate of Applied Science • Energy and Environmental Paralegal, Associate of Applied Science • Environmental Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Renewable Energy Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Solar Energy Technology, Associate of Applied Science • Sustainable Interior Design, Certificate Program • Wind Energy Technology, Associate of Applied ScienceTo learn more about Ecotech Institute, visit http://www.ecotechinstitute.com/. Applications are being acceptednow and financial assistance is available. page 13
  13. 13. Ecotech dean: ‘There is no college like this’ | Adam GoldsteinJanuary 20, 2011 Photovoltaic solar panels and wind turbines dot the roof, “solar trees” stand in the parking lot and motion-triggered systems control the lights in the classrooms. Such cutting-edge features at the 620,000-square-foot Ecotech campus near East Mississippi Avenue and Interstate 225 aren’t just for show. The commitment to “green” technology at every level of the facility’s operation points to the school’s deeper mission, according to faculty and administrators. “One of the key issues is how we built the facility,” said Ecotech President Michael Seifert. “We have the solar trees, we have amajor wind turbine; that’s a key issue. We wanted to make sure that as we teach these future employees, thatwe walk the talk. I think that’s very important.”Ecotech, a trade school focused entirely on renewable energy, sustainable design and “green” technologywelcomed about 200 students to its new campus in Aurora last week. Touting the only school of its kind,Ecotech officials pointed to future growth as students filed in for classes in solar energy technology, energyefficiency and other fields.“The thought is that this will be the hub where we fine tune the program,” said Glenn Wilson, Ecotech’sacademic dean. “There is no college like this that prepares (students) for these types of technical jobs in theclean energy field.”Less than a year after the Ecotech Institute opened its first classes in a temporary facility off East Iliff Avenue,officials opened the doors to new and returning students at its permanent home at 1400 S. Abilene St. Thebuilding boasts a programmable logic controller lab and a 20-foot tower to train students on wind safety andtechnology installation. The school draws its faculty equally from the private sector and academia.“There’s such a wealth of talent in the technical fields, there are a lot of companies starting up here,” Wilsonsaid. “If you’re going to teach math or science, we hire academic people. If you’re going to teach how to breakdown a wind turbine, we might get someone who’s had some teaching experience, but we’re more concernedthat they understand this job that the students will be doing in the field.”Phil Myers, the school’s program director, came to Ecotech after teaching at the Air Force Academy in ColoradoSprings and at community colleges across the state. Filling a post similar to a department chair at Ecotech helda special appeal, Myers said, because of the school’s unique curriculum and because of its funding structure. page 1
  14. 14. “It looked like one of the most exciting things that wasgoing to happen in my life,” Myers said. “The state system... because of the way it’s funded, when people reallyneed education in economic downturns, the budgets arealways cut. We’re right at a time where we really need tobe educating people, especially in fields that are essentialto our nation’s success and security. Private institutionshave the ability to fund as demand requires.”The school’s two-year degree program offers associatedegrees in electrical engineering technology, energy andenvironmental paralegal, energy efficiency, environmentaltechnology, renewable energy technology, solar energytechnology and wind energy technology, as well as a certificate program in sustainable interior design.Ecotech’s faculty total about 70 instructors who are all required to hold a master’s degree.The tuition runs at about $350 per credit hour, and the specialized degree programs encompass 96 credithours for completion.The school’s general education requirements include math, science, English and computer technology courses.“When we talk to the people hiring the students, we want them to have a good understanding of the physics,the chemistry, the geography and everything that’s behind the science. That’s why we have general eds,”Wilson said. “Then we have classes that are related to core manufacturing and installing. We have basicelectricity, we have safety, digital electronics ... so they understand the equipment in a generic sort of way.”Ecotech’s parent company, Alabama-based Education Corporation of America, also operates Virginia College,Culinard: The Culinary Institute of Virginia and the Golf Academy of America. In total, the ECA enrolls anestimated 19,000 students.When officials first announced plans for Ecotech last year, they said enrollment at the Aurora school couldrange between 700 and 1,200. Now in its third quarter, the trade school is still building its attendancenumbers, Wilson said. About 75 new students started classes at the school this week, while more than 100returning students moved to classes in the new facility.Still, Ecotech officials say the new building can accommodate more than 1,000 students, a number they’rehoping to eventually surpass. Satellite campuses could be part of the school’s future, officials said, but theAurora facility will stand as the model for the school’s operations and curriculum.“As we go to the next campus, we’ll have a model,” Wilson said. “We’ll know the lab equipment, thecurriculum, we’ll have experience with the employers and the jobs. This is a proving ground for this process.” page 1
  15. 15. Alternative energy opens new classroom opportunities | Cathy ProctorJanuary 21, 2011 page 1
  16. 16. page 1
  17. 17. Rep. Perlmutter boils down Obama’s State of the Union | Sara CastellanosJanuary 25, 2011In his State of the Union speech Tuesday evening, President Barack Obama listed a variety of objectives for thecoming year and detailed specific methods by which America could compete in the global arena.But the gist of his message could be boiled down to three themes, said U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Golden— opportunity, innovation and working together.At the speech, Perlmutter sat between U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Aurora, and Cory Gardner, R-Yuma, in a raresymbol of bipartisanship that was spearheaded by Democratic U.S. Sen. Mark Udall.“I think each of us was out of our comfort zone a little bit,” Perlmutter said. “But I think we enjoyed sitting nextto each other.”Even with the Colorado legislators’ proximity during the president’s address, Coffman wasted little time incriticizing the underlying message of Obama’s speech. In a release distributed soon after the State of the Unionaddress, Coffman characterized the president’s pledges as thinly veiled promises for continued governmentspending and intervention.“The President pledged to improve the economy by lowering government barriers, but at the same time hetried to sell us on his plan for further ‘investment’ in our economy,” Coffman said in a statement. “I’ll callthat as I see it: a codeword for billions of dollars of more spending and anyone can see that adding to the $14trillion deficit will do nothing to create jobs or grow the economy.”Obama discussed how the spirit of bipartisanship and cooperation would pave the way for loftyaccomplishments.Perlmutter said lawmakers on both sides of the aisle will be able to agree on common areas this year:improving education and tax code and spurring clean energy.He said Aurora is already leading the way in clean energy creation with its Ecotech Institute, a collegededicated to preparing students for careers in renewable energy.As for small businesses in Aurora that are looking to get into the renewable energy business, Perlmutter saidhe’d ensure that loan guarantees will be given to projects that are innovative and imaginative.Beginning this year, Obama said he would institute a freeze in annual domestic spending over the next fiveyears and veto any bill with Congressional earmarks that came across his desk.Perlmutter is not phased by that statement. page 1
  18. 18. “I’ll just have to work with the administration and make sure that the things that are important to our area getdone,” he said.This year’s State of the Union speech was aimed at bipartisanship cooperation, encouraging innovation,fostering improvements in education and cutting discretionary government spending.Last year, the president focused on goals that included spurring job creation, investing in education, passinghealth care reform and improving the people’s perception of division and distrust in the government.Overall, Perlmutter said he thought Obama’s speech this year was “solid.”“There were aspects that were pretty conservative in terms of education reform, tax reform, and parts thatwere considered progressive on clean energy,” Perlmutter said. “He hit a lot of points in that speech and helooked very presidential to me, talking about the problems we have but how America always rises to thechallenge.” page 1
  19. 19. Ecotech dean: ‘There is no college like this’ | Adam Goldstein (Aurora Sentinel)February 1, 2011Photovoltaic solar panels and wind turbines dot the roof, “solar trees” stand in the parking lot and motion-triggered systems control the lights in the classrooms.Such cutting-edge features at the 620,000-square-foot Ecotech campus near East Mississippi Avenue andInterstate 225 aren’t just for show. The commitment to “green” technology at every level of the facility’soperation points to the school’s deeper mission, according to faculty and administrators.“One of the key issues is how we built the facility,” said Ecotech President Michael Seifert. “We have the solartrees, we have a major wind turbine; that’s a key issue. We wanted to make sure that as we teach these futureemployees, that we walk the talk. I think that’s very important.”Ecotech, a trade school focused entirely on renewable energy, sustainable design and “green” technologywelcomed about 200 students to its new campus in Aurora last week. Touting the only school of its kind,Ecotech officials pointed to future growth as students filed in for classes in solar energy technology, energyefficiency and other fields.“The thought is that this will be the hub where we fine tune the program,” said Glenn Wilson, Ecotech’sacademic dean. “There is no college like this that prepares (students) for these types of technical jobs in theclean energy field.”Less than a year after the Ecotech Institute opened its first classes in a temporary facility off East Iliff Avenue,officials opened the doors to new and returning students at its permanent home at 1400 S. Abilene St. Thebuilding boasts a programmable logic controller lab and a 20-foot tower to train students on wind safety andtechnology installation. The school draws its faculty equally from the private sector and academia.“There’s such a wealth of talent in the technical fields, there are a lot of companies starting up here,” Wilsonsaid. “If you’re going to teach math or science, we hire academic people. If you’re going to teach how to breakdown a wind turbine, we might get someone who’s had some teaching experience, but we’re more concernedthat they understand this job that the students will be doing in the field.”Phil Myers, the school’s program director, came to Ecotech after teaching at the Air Force Academy in ColoradoSprings and at community colleges across the state. Filling a post similar to a department chair at Ecotech helda special appeal, Myers said, because of the school’s unique curriculum and because of its funding structure.“It looked like one of the most exciting things that was going to happen in my life,” Myers said. “The statesystem ... because of the way it’s funded, when people really need education in economic downturns, thebudgets are always cut. We’re right at a time where we really need to be educating people, especially in fieldsthat are essential to our nation’s success and security. Private institutions have the ability to fund as demandrequires.”The school’s two-year degree program offers associate degrees in electrical engineering technology, energy page 20
  20. 20. and environmental paralegal, energy efficiency, environmental technology, renewable energy technology, solarenergy technology and wind energy technology, as well as a certificate program in sustainable interior design.Ecotech’s faculty total about 70 instructors who are all required to hold a master’s degree.The tuition runs at about $350 per credit hour, and the specialized degree programs encompass 96 credithours for completion.The school’s general education requirements include math, science, English and computer technology courses.“When we talk to the people hiring the students, we want them to have a good understanding of the physics,the chemistry, the geography and everything that’s behind the science. That’s why we have general eds,”Wilson said. “Then we have classes that are related to core manufacturing and installing. We have basicelectricity, we have safety, digital electronics ... so they understand the equipment in a generic sort of way.”Ecotech’s parent company, Alabama-based Education Corporation of America, also operates Virginia College,Culinard: The Culinary Institute of Virginia and the Golf Academy of America. In total, the ECA enrolls anestimated 19,000 students.When officials first announced plans for Ecotech last year, they said enrollment at the Aurora school couldrange between 700 and 1,200. Now in its third quarter, the trade school is still building its attendancenumbers, Wilson said. About 75 new students started classes at the school this week, while more than 100returning students moved to classes in the new facility.Still, Ecotech officials say the new building can accommodate more than 1,000 students, a number they’rehoping to eventually surpass. Satellite campuses could be part of the school’s future, officials said, but theAurora facility will stand as the model for the school’s operations and curriculum.“As we go to the next campus, we’ll have a model,” Wilson said. “We’ll know the lab equipment, thecurriculum, we’ll have experience with the employers and the jobs. This is a proving ground for this process.” page 21
  21. 21. Ecotech Institute unveils new green campus | Amanda H. MillerFebruary 4, 2011 A new trade school dedicated to training the next generation of green- technology workers opened a solar panel-clad campus in Aurora, Colo., last week. The 62,000-square-foot facility is a state-of-the art building fitted with wind turbines, solar photovoltaic panels and solar trees in the parking lot. The solar and wind features on the building will provide about 10 percent of its energy needs, said Glenn Wilson, Ecotech Institute academic dean.The solar trees in the parking lot are one of the school’s most prominent and visible green feature, whichadvertises the greater purpose of the school.“People will be able to charge electric cars into those solar trees,” Wilson said. “They’ll be able to charge themthere.”The Ecotech Institute was founded by the Education Corporation of America, which owns and operates tradeand community colleges around the country.“They saw a need for an educational institution that would prepare students for green technology careers,”Wilson said.He said the Education Corporation decided to locate its new school in Aurora because Colorado is rich withuniversities and research institutions like the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, doing good work andresearch in green technology. There are also a lot of companies entering into commercial enterprises involvinggreen technology, Wilson said.“Colorado is also a great environment for renewables research—lots of sun and wind,” Wilson said.The school opened two years ago and has been functioning in a temporary location until the start of thissemester last week, Wilson said.When the new building opened last week, about 200 new and returning students filtered through the doors.The building is large, and there will be a lot of room for expansion over the next few years as the school growsand becomes more well-known throughout the country.It is the first school of its kind, devoted completely to green technology education, Wilson said.The building will prove to be a tool for students in their classes, Wilson said.“They’ll be able see a solar installation and monitor its energy production so they can better understand howthe technology works,” Wilson said. page 22
  22. 22. Affordable Trade Schools | Clare Inza TylerFebruary 6, 2011What makes a trade school affordable pertains to the overall cost in relation to the skills being taught. Themore marketable and lucrative the skills, the more “worth it” the cost will be. If a student lacks sufficient fundsto attend school, some trade schools offer a payment plan. Qualified students may consider student financingas an option. Attending a school offering a flexible class schedule allows for part-time employment to help withschool expenses.Ecotech InstituteEcotech Institute in Aurora, Colorado, gears its curriculum exclusively toward helping create and maintain agreen economy. Training is offered in a variety of sustainable design and renewable energy fields. Flexible classschedules make this school an attractive choice for those needing part-time work. Financial aid for those whoqualify helps put students’ attention on career goals as opposed to financial concerns. Ecotech is accreditedthrough the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools.Crimson Technical CollegeThe Airframe Powerplant (AP) program at Crimson Technical College in Inglewood, California, focuses onthe safety of aircraft while in flight. Technicians receive certification from the Federal Aviation Administration,which gives an AP exam. If passed, it qualifies the technician for an entry-level job. Regarding affordability,Crimson expresses the belief that everyone has the right to education beyond high school. They participate infederal and state loan programs and encourage those who qualify to take advantage of them. Stress is put onearly enrollment to assure receipt of financial aid. With the exception of the Pell Grant, students must enrollfor at least half-time in order to be eligible for assistance. Crimson’s website contains detailed information. Thecollege is accredited by the Commission of the Council on Occupational Education.Environmental Technical InstituteChicago’s Environmental Technical Institute (ETI) offers up-to-date training in heating, ventilation and airconditioning and welding. Graduate benefits make it cost effective in the long run. For example, graduatesaudit classes free of charge. They meet with instructors of the school to go over their work life sincegraduation. The comprehensive audio-visual library serves graduates as well as students. ETI’s Career ServicesDepartment helps with employment opportunities. ETI participates in a number of federal financial aidprograms, and qualified students can obtain details from the school’s Financial Aid staff. Accreditation isthrough the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools/Colleges of Technology.Penn Foster Career SchoolFor distance education, Penn Foster Career School--- headquartered in Scranton, Pennsylvania --- easesfinancial burden by offering a variety of payment plans. If unable to pay in full, students set up an automaticpayment plan for deductions to be made monthly either from bank accounts or credit cards. The other optioninvolves mailing in monthly payments using a coupon book. The school offers a vast selection of courses forstudents in just about every trade found in the workforce. Veterans’ education benefits apply for courses atPenn Foster, and military personnel receive tuition reimbursement. The school is accredited by the Commissionon Secondary Schools of the Middle States Association and the Distance Education and Training Council. page 23
  23. 23. February kicks off with solar gains and icy roads | Chris MeehanFebruary 7, 2011 While the solar industry continues to grow, it’s not big enough to warrant a Super Bowl ad yet. Maybe in 2012. Who knows, by then a company like Genesis Electronics, selling solar-powered chargers for iPhones, could have a SuperBowl ad. Or maybe it will be a solar leasing company like SolarCity or Sungevity, after they’ve expanded nationwide. They’re both expanding their reach in 2011, for instance, fast on the heels of SolarCity’s expansion into Oregon. SolarCity said it will start offering solar leases in Maryland and Washington, D.C. Then last week, it announced that Citigroup was investing $40 million into SolarCity’s coffers, allowing it to expand the number of SolarLeases it can offer in 2011. On the other hand, you might not need a solar lease for a new home. You could buy into a community solar project. For instance,folks are pretty happy with Clean Energy Collective’s first community-owned solar array in Colorado. Thecompany is now developing more solar gardens in Colorado and looking to expand its model elsewhere.Perhaps your next new home will be built with solar integrated in from day one. Developers are working onprojects that include solar in the blueprints. For instance, the 2500 R revitalization project includes 34 net-zeroenergy homes being built by Pacific Housing Inc., which include photovoltaic arrays.The homes in the California project are designed as entry-levels houses and will be offered below market price.That’s not the case of BuiltSmart Resources’ sprawling 3,900 square foot, solar-powered, net-zero energyhome in San Antonio, Texas. The house would cost about $550,000 on a normal-sized lot, but it’s on a two-acrelot near the city and is valued at $1.3 million.With all this growth in the industry, it’s no surprise that schools are involved in the growth of clean energy.Even in the rainy northwestern U.S., schools like Clatsop Community College are installing solar. The schoolrecently completed work on its Towler Hall renovation project, which included the installation of a 42.5-kilowatt array.Last week saw the opening of Ecotech Institute’s new campus in Colorado, the first U.S. trade school dedicatedpurely to renewable energy education. It’s not that other Colorado higher education institutions aren’tinterested in renewable energy—Colorado State University’s foothills campus gets a full third of its power fromsolar now that the school completed the second phase of its 5.3 megawatt solar array.California, of course, refuses to be left behind. page 2
  24. 24. Last week, Wells Fargo invested $100 million to install solar at the University of San Diego and five otherCalifornia schools.But not everyone in California is happy about solar being installed at their school.Parents and students of Dwyer Middle School in Huntington Beach, Calif., protested the planned location of asolar array on the school’s front lawn.Georgia Power made the solar news twice last week. First the company announced that it would purchase a1 megawatt solar farm and sell the power generated to Dalton Utilities under a wholesale contract, the firsttime the company has made such an arrangement with a solar farm. Second, the company said it is installingphotovoltaics along some of its electric lines to study how distributed solar generation will impact thecompany’s power network in Georgia.It seems like they’re getting the picture in Georgia. But in some states, like South Dakota, a lack of incentiveprograms and lack of interest from the state’s electric cooperatives has stymied growth in solar. The statecould benefit from developing large-scale solar plants by selling the power produced to more populous statesnearby.Heck, the state would be an ideal location for large-scale, concentrated solar power plants. Such projects,which include solar power towers, troughs and solar powered Stirling engines are already expected to be onthe rise in 2011 and beyond, according to a new report from Lux Research.In all, it was another busy week for solar, and while the industry is gaining yardage, it’s going to be interestingto watch how many touchdowns the industry can score against the entrenched fossil fuel-based energyindustry in 2011. page 2
  25. 25. Wind Mill Construction Schools | Ian BurnsFebruary 9, 2011 If you’re interested in building windmills, find a technical or trade school that specializes in renewable energy sources. These schools provide wind turbine technician certificates that employers on wind farms will use to gauge your proficiency on tasks such as engineering circuits to convert wind into energy or designing blades that maximize the amount of wind captured. Ecotech Institute The Ecotech Institute in Denver, Colorado opened in early 2011 sporting a solar panel and wind turbine clad campus. Founded by the Education Corporation of America, theEcotech Institute provides an Associate of Applied Science in wind energy technology that teaches studentshow to operate, maintain and repair wind turbines and prepares them to work on variable pitch/variablespeed turbines as well. The Ecotech Institute is the first trade school dedicated solely to green energytechnology and education.Wind Turbine Technician AcademyA part of the Kalamazoo Valley Community College in Kalamazoo, Michigan, the Wind Turbine TechnicianAcademy offers a 26 week, competency based program that equips graduates with a Kalamazoo ValleyCommunity College Certificate of Completion, a BZEE certificate (after the student passes the appropriate testsand finishes the minimum field experience requirement) and a transcript that can be used as a reference foremployers.Northwest Renewable Energy InstituteThe Northwest Renewable Energy Institute has campuses in Eugene, Oregon; Medford, Oregon; Ellensburg,Washington and Yakima, Washington. Students have access to a variety of classes on subjects ranging fromwind turbine safety to technical writing.Oklahoma City Community CollegeThe OCCC Wind Technician Certification Program consists of 6 classes: Introduction to Wind Energy, AC/DC Fundamentals, Industrial Electronics, Electromechanical Devices, Instrumentation and control andProgrammable Controller. Classes total 88 weeks. page 2
  26. 26. February 10, 2011‘Green jobs’ Come in Every Shape and SizeEveryone is talking about “green jobs.” While many people are eager to become employed in the sustainabilitysector, there are naysayers who don’t believe that they actually exist. As part of the ongoing, healthy dialogueabout what and where green jobs are, it’s important to make an important distinction. While there are bonafide positions that can be appropriately defined as a green job, there are thousands of other careers that aresimply changing in the new energy economy. The truth is, workplaces are shifting to more sustainable models,with or without the catchy phrase.According to the Colorado Cleantech Action Plan, “Cleantech is growing in Colorado and creating thousandsof jobs.” Citing the Pew Center’s report, The Clean Energy Economy: Repowering Jobs, Businesses, andInvestments Across America (http://bit.ly/dIpWGM), “Between 1999 and 2009, Colorado’s cleantech industrygrew at an annualized rate of 18 percent, more than twice the rate of the Colorado economy as a whole (8percent).”And Colorado isn’t alone. However, while wind, solar, energy efficiency and additional sustainable fields arerapidly growing, they are not the only industries presenting green jobs to the workforce. Many career pathsare taking a turn, requiring new thinking and skill sets to keep up with the changing environmental landscape.Architects, engineers, electricians and machinists will continue to be in demand, yet their job descriptionsmay be continuously altered. Electricians will need to understand the new utility landscape; machinists will berequired to install and maintain new technologies; engineers across all industries will be asked to channel theirknowledge towards designing sustainable systems.Here are some examples of changing industries outside of the traditional cleantech sector:Utility companies. “Powerful trends are transforming the U.S. utility sector, including climate change, energysecurity, and energy price volatility concerns; increasing deployment of alternative resources like energyefficiency and renewable energy; and shifts in natural gas and other fossil fuel industries. Utilities that respondmost effectively to these key trends – and whose regulators and legislators support them in doing so – will bebest positioned to succeed in the 21st century.” (The 21st Century Electric Utility: Positioning for a Low-CarbonFuture, a Ceres report published by Navigant Consulting. 2010.)Real Estate. From architects to real estate appraisers and agents to top executives, real estate professionalsare under pressure to recognize efficient building techniques, gain awareness of green design elements andeffectively value and incorporate them in today’s marketplace. page 2
  27. 27. Corporate real estate executives are illustrating commitment to making sustainable decisions within theirreal estate portfolios, which requires knowledge of Green Building certifications, Energy Labels, the costs andbenefits of retrofitting buildings and much more. According to the third annual CoreNet Global and Jones LangLaSalle sustainability survey conducted in September and October 2009 (http://bit.ly/hjgKm0), research showsthat sustainability remains a key agenda item for corporate real estate executives.The report states, “Sustainability is a critical business issue today for 70 percent of respondents and 89 percentconsider sustainability criteria in their location decisions.”Law firms. With an influx of sustainable activity, there will inevitably be legal issues. Well-prepared law firmshave lawyers and paralegals on staff who have the knowledge and confidence to perform highly complexenvironmental legal research; draft, analyze, and manage complex legal documents and correspondence aboutenvironmental topics; and prepare environmental filings, reports; real estate documents and more.Agriculture. While windmills have been used on farms for decades, farmers and the overall agricultureindustry are taking great strides that are good for the earth, crops and business. Farming is actually amongthe original green jobs, but new technologies are coming to market, requiring agricultural business leadersto sell, install and maintain systems that keep our food supply moving and meet consumers’ desire for asustainable food system.In Workforce Management magazine (http://bit.ly/gFQVHj), Raquel Pinderhughes, a professor of urban studiesat San Francisco State University, “identified 22 economic sectors with green-collar opportunities, includingfood production (using organic agriculture), manufacturing (making energy-efficient and recycled products)and auto repair (servicing alternative-fuel vehicles).”While the Bureau of Labor Statistics hasn’t yet defined “green jobs,” there are businesses, HR directors, careerservices departments and educational institutions invested in fostering sustainable careers across all industries.Whether a career is given the term “green job” or fits within the confines of the green landscape, changes areinevitable. They are already beginning to be reflected in educational and job training options. For example,Ecotech Institute, based in Aurora, Colorado (a suburb of Denver) has opened its doors as the first and onlyinstitution solely focused on renewable energy and sustainable design. Launched in April 2010, futuregraduates are already in demand according to the college.“We’re consistently receiving phone calls from businesses who can’t wait for our first graduating class,” saidAlison Wise, Director of Career Services for Ecotech Institute. “We speak with representatives from a widerange of industries, all seeking people who can serve as the future leaders of their changing workforce.”For more information on how Ecotech Institute sees the future of green jobs and education, visit www.ecotechinstitute.com. page 2
  28. 28. Green Energy Training Schools | Angus Koolbreeze IIIFebruary 11, 2011 Because of President Obama’s commitment to expanding alternative energy, such as solar power, employers need workers who can build and operate solar power systems, windmills and other forms of green energy. Consequently, a number of schools have added such training to their curriculum. One such institution has arisen solely for the purpose of training workers in this profession. Allied Schools Allied Schools is a participant in the renewable energy technology revolution. Even though that is not the school’s only focus, it does recognize the Obama administration’scommitment to doubling the use of renewable energy by 2012, according to the Allied website. The degreeprogram even has a class, The Business of Solar, whose purpose is to prepare entrepreneurially-minded peopleto build a viable solar energy business. The program also includes a class in photovaltaic systems. There is atest, but if you don’t pass it, you pay nothing for the class. Allied Schools has provided distance education to itsstudents since 1992. According to the website, it has enrolled close to 825,000 students. For more informationconcerning the school’s programs, call toll free: 800-732-7410.PinnaclePinnacle Career Institute, which has taught trade seeking students for over 50 years, teaches a course on beinga wind turbine technician. The college--which has two locations in Kansas City, and one in Lawrence, as wellas an online course--teaches hands-on skills. According to the PCI website, you will learn the requisite skills tooperate and manage a wind turbine and to keep it in working order. The program ends with a boot camp inSweetwater, Texas. To find out more about this institution, call 877-724-7344.EvergladesEverglades University, whose main campus is at 5002 T-Rex Avenue, in Boca Raton, Florida, started in 1998, theyear that Arthur and Belinda Kaiser founded the school. The original name was the American Fliers College; in1999 the college adopted the Everglades University name. The university also includes two satellite campuses,one in Altamonte Springs, Florida, and the other one in Sarasota. The institution offers a bachelor of sciencedegree in the field of alternative and renewable energy. To complete the degree, you must also pass 30 credithours of general education courses. For more information, call 888-772-6077.Ecotech InstituteEcotech Institute, located on 1400 S. Abilene Street in Aurora, Colorado, bears the distinction of being the onlyschool that specializes in preparing students for careers in renewable energy. Indeed, it is the only reason thecollege exists. Ecotech offers hands-on training designed to meet the needs of employers in the new greeneconomy, according to the school website. The college employs teachers with real-life experience in the energymanagement and green design fields. The school opened its doors in April, 2010. page 2
  29. 29. In putting together its curriculum, the curriculum designers sought feedback from the heads of majorcorporations who said that they needed people with sustainable and renewable energy-related skills, suchas windmill operation and management and solar power system construction and maintenance. The school’swebsite says the only entrance requirement is a “desire and ability to learn.” For more information aboutenrollment, call 877-326-5576. page 30
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  31. 31. Building a Work Force for the New-Energy Economy | Nora CaleyMarch 1, 2011 page 32
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  34. 34. Eco Pioneer | Beck IrelandMarch 1, 2011Ecotech Institute, the first and only college entirely focused on education and training in renewable energy andsustainable design, prepares electrical workers for green jobsIn July 2010, Ecotech Institute, the first and only college entirely focused on education and training inrenewable energy and sustainable design, opened its doors tostudents. A division of Education Corp. of America, Birmingham,Ala., the college offers six technical programs, including electricalengineering technology, energy efficiency, environmental technology,renewable energy technology, solar energy technology, and windenergy technology (see Ecotech Institute Programs Up Close). Atthe completion of each two-year, 96-hour credit program, studentsreceive an Associate of Applied Science degree.The institute marks Education Corp. of America’s first foray intotechnical education. “What it found is that there’s really a big needin the renewable energy field for technicians who are going to install, operate, and maintain equipment in therenewable energy field,” says Glenn Wilson, dean of students. “There’s been a really large growth in the jobs inthat sector.”With a degree from the institute, graduates should be able to get work as an installer of renewable energy andenergy-efficient systems, but they can also work in the green manufacturing industry. “They certainly could getthe [North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners] NABCEP or the [Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.]UL certifications and work as an installer,” says Wilson. “The degree prepares them to do not only that, butthey could also work in manufacturing as a high-level maintenance technician.”Somewhere between construction and engineering is how Wilson describes the unique curriculum at theinstitute. “Our students experience some lecture, but we focus on giving them as much hands-on experienceas possible,” he says. “They learn what an engineer might learn, such as control theory and digital and analogcontrol, but the programs also teach them how to apply what they’re learning. They’ll have a really broad-based education on energy and the whole renewable field.”Second careersCurrently, almost 200 students are enrolled in the technical college. The institute’s goal is eventually to attractaround 1,000. Some of the students have arrived straight out of high school. “They’re excited about doingsomething in the renewable energy field,” says Wilson.There are non-traditional students as well. In this economy, people start looking to begin a second career ina different field that may offer more opportunities. “There are quite a few second-career students who havebeen in another industry that either no longer exists, or they just want to leave for whatever reason —sothey’re trying to retrain themselves for a market that has a lot of job growth,” Wilson says. “They know to get ajob in this sector requires some pretty good training.” page 3
  35. 35. As a result, the Ecotech Institute campus is already fairly diverse. “We have students who range in age from18 to into their 50s,” says Wilson, who is encouraged to see quite a few women enrolled in the programs too.“The number of women in manufacturing just continues to grow, and we’d like to see more of them involved insome of the maintenance and technical aspects as well,” Wilson says. “These are good jobs with good benefits,so a lot of women are seeing this as a good career path.”Moreover, Wilson sees veterans of the electrical construction industry as good candidates for some of theprograms. “It’s a good fit for people with a construction background who want to work not just installing, butalso want to understand the theory,” he explains. “That’s why the program is geared toward a combination ofhands-on labs and theory. It will allow them to maintain and troubleshoot equipment — not just install it.”In fact, one of the institute’s newest students, according to Wilson, is the president of a local chapter of anelectrical workers’ union. “He enrolled here because he wants to learn about the renewable industry and alsocontrols theory,” Wilson says. “Certainly, a lot of people in electrical construction are seeing renewables as agrowth area, and they want to understand the specifics.”Admission to the technical college requires a high school degree. In addition, candidates must be able topass a basic English and math skills test. Most of the programs include general education classes, such ascomposition, physical science, and algebra. “For some people, that’s going to be challenging.” Wilson says.However, the institute offers tutoring before classes start for those students who haven’t been inside aclassroom in quite some time. “A lot of people just need some refreshing,” Wilson continues. “We try to getthem up to speed so when they enter school, they’re not behind.” Furthermore, students will also need theintellectual capacity to understand the subject of their program. “They’ll be studying some pretty sophisticatedcontrol systems,” Wilson concludes.Students with electrical experience could move to the head of the class in certain cases. For example, they maybe able to skip the classes on industrial wiring, 3-phase power, bus bars, and how to wire motors. “We wouldprobably exempt them from those classes,” Wilson says.Friendly climateAlthough the institute sees multiple campuses as a real possibility,according to Wilson, the location in Aurora, Colo., is currently theonly campus (see Ecotech Institute Campus). “We would like tohave locations elsewhere,” Wilson says, noting that at this timethere are no online courses either. “We see that as being a realpossibility as demand continues to grow.”However, the administration sees its location in Colorado as anatural match for the school. “The state has really good naturalresources, good sun, good wind, and a lot of renewable activitygoing on here,” says Wilson.In fact, Colorado currently ranks 9th in wind project installations by state, adding 178MW of wind power in2009. Also that year, Colorado ranked 8th in installed wind capacity and 11th in wind resources. The state nowranks 3rd nationally for distributed solar PV capacity and 6th for its solar resources. It is also the location of theNational Renewable Energy Lab (NREL).In addition to the actual climate, the political climate is kind to renewable energy as well. In 2009, theGovernor’s Energy Office (GEO), with funding from the U.S. page 3
  36. 36. Department of Energy (DOE) and Clean Energy Funds directed by the state legislature, spent more than $25.2million, with 9%, or $2,268,000, directed to renewable energy and sustainability projects. The next year, thestate legislature voted to increase the Renewable Energy Standard to a “Best in the West” 30% by 2020. Thenew law will create thousands of clean-energy jobs, further diversify Colorado’s overall energy portfolio,and lead to 100,000 solar rooftops over the next decade. “There’s a really good legislative climate for therenewable industry here,” Wilson concludes.Ecotech Institute Programs Up CloseAurora, Colo.-based Ecotech Institute, the first and only college in the United States entirely focused oneducation and training in renewable energy and sustainable design, offers six technical programs, includingelectrical engineering technology, energy efficiency, environmental technology, renewable energy technology,solar energy technology, and wind energy technology. At the completion of each two-year, 96-hour creditprogram, students receive an Associate of Applied Science degree. Following is a description of the programsthat may be of interest to electrical contractors:Electrical Engineering Technology: This program is designed to give graduates a solid grounding in thefundamentals of clean energy production and transmission while specializing in electrical engineering. State-of-the-art laboratories and facilities give students the opportunity to apply the theory they learn in real-world,hands-on situations. Students learn to apply electrical and electronic theory to design, build, repair, calibrate,and modify electrical components, circuitry, controls, and machinery and perform diagnostic electrical analysis.Classes cover topics such as AC and DC circuitry, safety techniques, power generation and transmission, analogand digital electronics, and electrical systems and controls.“Electrical engineering technology is for someone who wants to work at maintaining equipment in therenewable energy sector,” says Glenn Wilson, dean of students. “They can work in any of the fields.”The types of controls that are used in wind and solar energy systems, as well as manufacturing facilities forSCADA systems, are programmable logic controllers (PLCs). “So students get an education not just on wiringand construction, but they actually understand control theory and how to troubleshoot and maintain this typeof sophisticated equipment,” he says.Energy Efficiency: This program provides students with immersive and hands-on training that focuses onproviding sustainable energy solutions. It will prepare graduates to analyze, operate, and control the systemsand equipment that are used to create a suitable thermal environment used by a wide range of buildings andstructures. Graduates will be able to analyze and recommend suitable renewable energy systems to not onlymeet the needs of the user but also to be environmentally sound.The program teaches students how to analyze energy usage for residential and commercial buildings,recommend sustainable energy solutions for high-consumption structures, and recognize and correctinefficient building energy systems. It provides an understanding of the basics of energy-efficient hot watersystems and photovoltaic (PV) and solar energy. “We teach the students in this program the best way to helpthe energy industry is to not need as much in the first place,” Wilson says. “After you’ve done that, then alot of facilities want to look at augmenting that with renewable energy. But the focus on energy efficiency iswhat can you do in a residential, industrial, or a commercial application to reduce waste and optimize thosesystems.”Renewable Energy Technology: This program focuses on the engineering behind current and emergingtechnology. Each class in the curriculum is designed to give graduates a solid grounding in the fundamentalsof energy generation and transmission while also providing them with a broad background in engineeringtechnology. Graduates will be prepared to become engineering technicians with expertise across a page 3
  37. 37. broad range of renewable energy technology. Students learn how to apply theory and principles of engineeringtechnology in the real world and to perform diagnostic analysis. They will also learn to meet industry andregulatory operating and safety standards within the engineering technology field.Solar Energy Technology: This program prepares graduates for a career in the field of renewable energy with akey focus on solar energy technology. Students receive a solid grounding in the fundamentals of the productionand transmission of clean energy using the radiation provided by the sun. State-of-the-art laboratories andfacilities give them the opportunity to directly apply to the real world the theory they are learning. Typical jobsmight include construction, installing or repairing solar energy systems, or working with architects or engineersas they design and install solar projects. Students learn to operate, troubleshoot, maintain, and repair PVequipment, including how to perform maintenance, repair, or replace parts to correct problems. Graduates willbe able to perform diagnostic analysis and meet industry standards within the rapidly expanding solar energyfield.“After students learn about all the components of a solar installation, then they go outside to some buildingson campus and actually install solar panels,” says Wilson. “They do all of the wiring, so by the time theygraduate from the solar program, they’ve had some experience in hands-on wiring and installation of panelsand components of a solar system.”Wind Energy Technology: This program prepares graduates for careers in the field of renewable energy witha strong focus on wind energy technology. The program will give graduates a solid grounding in fundamentalswhile specializing in the generation and transmission of energy using wind power technology. State-of-the-artlaboratories and facilities give them the opportunity to apply in the real world the theory they learn in class.Graduates will be prepared to become wind energy technicians.Students learn how to evaluate new turbines and their readiness for operation and resolve early stageelectrical and mechanical faults. They also prepare to operate, troubleshoot, maintain, and repair a windturbine operation, including complicated mechanical and electrical problems on variable-pitch, variable-speedturbines. They are trained to perform mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical component maintenance, repair, orreplacement of parts to correct problems while meeting industry standards within the wind energy field.“In addition, graduates will understand the large picture of the wind industry,” says Wilson. “We give them agood education on costs, financing, and rebates. All of those aspects of the renewable field they need to beable to justify projects before they’re installed, so students get some classes in energy management and thefinancial part of the business as well.”Ecotech Institute CampusBefore it even opened its doors to students to study energy efficiency and renewable energy this pastsummer, Ecotech Institute transformed a vacant commercial building into a cutting-edge training facility thatincorporates energy and resource savings throughout. The Ecotech Institute campus in Aurora, Colo., includeslabs and classroom facilities that include many sustainable components.Ecotech has invested heavily in renewable technologies. All told, the campus will get more than 5% of its peakload electricity from these wind and solar sources. All together, the renewable energy sources at Ecotech willgenerate more than 65,000kWh of electricity annually. Renewable energy components of the school include: • 12 polycrystalline rooftop photovoltaic (PV) panels with a system capacity of 2.8kW. • Integral thin solar technologies embedded into the glass front building canopy with a system capacity of 9.4kW. page 3
  38. 38. • Eight small, building-mounted wind turbines mounted on the roof will generate up to 4.8kW of electricity. • A wind turbine mounted in front of the building with a total capacity of 4kW. • Two solar trees, each providing 16.9kW, will generate more than 50,000kWh per year of electricity.Energy-efficient lighting will reduce lighting energy consumption by 30% below standard lighting energy levels.Some of the methods of limiting the amount of energy used by lighting on campus include: • Motion sensors combined with a programmed lighting schedule. • Classroom and office lighting incorporate step-dimming options.A measurement and verification system will provide real-time monitoring of the campus power, natural gas,and water consumption. This information will be displayed in the lobby for visitor knowledge but will alsobe recorded and used to determine further energy-saving possibilities in the future. Finally, the campus willinclude four electric vehicle charging stations, capable of delivering a full vehicle charge in two to four hours. page 3
  39. 39. A Site for Energy Education | Michael SeifertMarch 1, 2011 Ecotech Institute launches a first of its kind campus devoted to renewable energy education, with a special emphasis on preparing students to enter the wind industry. A brand new 62,000 square-foot campus has opened its doors in the Denver metro area, changing the face of wind, solar, and renewable energy education in America. Ecotech Institute is the first and only college entirely focused on preparing America’sworkforce for careers in renewable energy and sustainable design, and the facility is sure to spark interest inthese fields.The architectural team was led by Ecotech’s parent company, Education Corporation of America, andAlabama-based Rob Walker Architects. They successfully transformed a vacant, large-footprint building into aprogressive campus. The building is home to 30 classrooms, 12 state of the art computer and science labs (e.g.electrical, wiring, solar, wind safety, controls and environmental science), studios, student and faculty lounges,a library, and a variety of other amenities.Site SelectionEducation Corporation of America is often focused on selecting campus sites where they can make a positiveimpact on a neighborhood. Empty buildings are often an eyesore and can impact neighboring businesses. Inthis case, an old Amazing Jake’s family fun center was the previous tenant. Once transformed, new traffic,additional consumers and a pleasing appearance will continue to yield positive results. Figure 1“We were focused on changing the empty commercial building into a community asset that is sustainable,functional, and attractive to its neighbors,” says Celeste Prestenbach, vice president, facilities planning andnew campus development at the Education Corporation of America.Focus on Wind EnergyAlthough there are energy and resource savings throughout the sustainable design of the building, a majorcomponent of the building and the school’s curriculum is wind energy. To support Ecotech’s commitment towind, the front of the building is adorned with eight small wind turbines mounted on the roof to generate upto 4.8 kilowatts of electricity. In addition, a vertical axis wind turbine was installed to generate a total capacityof 4 kilowatts.One unique component is a wind safety lab. The square room is simple, yet revolutionary. The 771 square-footlab has a 20-foot ladder leading up to an 8x8 platform. This is where Ecotech instructors will teach page 0
  40. 40. wind safety techniques and practices. The students will be using the actual harnesses that would be used togo up and down a real wind turbine, helping simulate this significant element of a career as a wind technician.“This wind lab is the first of its kind, offering students a glimpse into a career where physical activity and safetyare critical,” says Glenn Wilson, academic dean of students at Ecotech Institute. Figure 2To carry the wind theme from the outside to the inside, ECA’s in-house interior design team integrated theshape and form of the wind turbine blades into the front gallery of the building through the repetition of asimilar curve along the walls. This is more evident from a plan view of the interior. In addition to wind elementsthe building incorporates a variety of solar aspects, as well, including: 12 polycrystalline rooftop photovoltaicsolar panels with a system capacity of 2.8 kilowatts; integral thin solar technologies embedded into the glassof the front building canopy with a capacity of 9.4 kilowatts; and two solar trees, each providing 16.9 kilowattsof electricity, which will generate over 50,000 kilowatt hours per year of electricity. All told, the campus willget more than 5 percent of its peak load electricity from wind and solar sources and will generate over 65,000kilowatt hours of electricity annually.Additional Energy SavingsAnother key component of the campus is its rigorous energy savings and demand side management processesthat will cut demand significantly. Some examples include demand control ventilation to modulate ventilationbased upon occupancy levels in classrooms. This will dramatically reduce the cooling/heating during partiallyoccupied periods. All rooftop air conditioning equipment will have economizers to provide 100 percentoutside air during ideal outdoor conditions for cooling, and energy efficient lighting will reduce lightingenergy consumption by 30 percent below standard lighting energy levels. In addition, a measurement andverification system provides real time monitoring of the campus power, natural gas, and water consumption.This information will be displayed in the lobby for visitor knowledge, but will also be recorded and used todetermine further energy saving possibilities in the future.The building also incorporates water and lighting efficiencies. For instance, motion sensors combined with aprogrammed lighting schedule limit the amount of time lighting stays on when rooms are unoccupied. Thecampus also includes four electric car charging stations, capable of delivering a full vehicle charge in two tofour hours. The campus embraces the institute’s core concerns: exceptional education and commitment to theenvironment. Figure 3Ecotech Institute launched its first round of classes in July 2010 in a temporary facility and the third quartercommenced January 10, 2011 in the new facility with almost 200 students enrolled.Why Colorado?Ecotech Institute chose to launch its first location in Colorado for many reasons, including its location,entrepreneurial culture, and passion for green job growth. Colorado’s culture, natural beauty, and green-leaning attitude fosters greener lifestyles, education, and careers. The campus is strategically located to serveworkforce development throughout the Rocky Mountain region, one of the country’s fastest growing areas forrenewable energy.In 2009, the Colorado Governor’s Energy office, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy and CleanEnergy Funds directed by the state legislature, spent over $25.2 million in fiscal year 2009, with 9 percent, or$2,268,000, directed to renewable energy and sustainability projects.In 2010, the State Legislature voted to increase the Renewable Energy Standard to a “Best in the West” 30percent by 2020. The new law will create thousands of clean-energy jobs, further diversify Colorado’s overallenergy portfolio and lead to 100,000 solar rooftops over the next decade. page 1
  41. 41. Colorado is also home to public and private institutions that are creating innovation and employment. TheNational Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado School ofMines, and Colorado State University created the collaboratory in 2007 to research and develop new, cleanerenergy technologies. Figure 4In wind alone, Colorado makes the grade in national rankings. In 2009 Colorado ranked ninth in windprojects installations by state, adding 178 MW of wind power, ranked eighth in installed wind capacity andeleventh in wind resources. Not only is Colorado a fantastic place to live and work, its culture lends itself toEcotech’s mission: when you live in a state than appreciates natural beauty, it helps people to understand theimportance of sustainability.What’s Wind’s Future?According to “Clean Tech Job Trends 2010,” three clean tech categories in particular held their ground as thedominant innovative leaders throughout 2009, based upon number of patents granted: solar (at approximately31 percent), wind (at approximately 19 percent) and hybrid vehicles (at approximately 15 percent).In the report “Green Collar Jobs in the U.S. and Colorado” (2009) by Roger Bezdek, principal investigator,Management Information Services, Inc., for the American Solar Energy Society, U.S. renewable energy andenergy efficiency (REEE) industries are creating jobs faster than other leading industries. Figure 5It stated that “In 2007, the U.S. REEE industries generated more than $1 trillion in sales and created morethan 9 million jobs—including $10.3 billion in sales and more than 91,000 jobs in Colorado. U.S. REEErevenues represent substantially more than the combined 2007 sales of the three largest U.S. corporations—Wal-Mart, ExxonMobil, and General Motors ($905 billion). REEE industries are growing faster than theaverage U.S. industry and comprise some of the most rapidly growing industries in the world, including wind,photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells, recycling/remanufacturing, and biofuels.”In 2009, the Executive Office of the President, Council of Economic Advisors, published a report “Preparing theWorkers of Today for the Jobs of Tomorrow.” Here are a few of its findings: • Jobs devoted to environmental improvement grew far faster than other occupations from 2000-2006 and the BLS projects fast relative growth through 2016; • There are growing opportunities in these fields, particularly for workers with technical skills; • CEA analysis suggests that particular areas of “green” potential (e.g., wind and turbine manufacturing, mass transit, or producing energy-efficient automobiles) pay more on average than otherwise comparable jobs. They also are more likely to be held by primary earners in the household and to be unionized; • Well-trained and highly-skilled workers will be best positioned to secure high-wage jobs, thereby fueling American prosperity. Occupations requiring higher educational attainment are projected to grow much faster than those with lower education requirements, with the fastest growth among occupations that require an associate’s degree or a post-secondary vocational award.Lastly, the research “U.S. Metro Economies: Current and Potential Green Jobs in the U.S. Economy” (2008),prepared by Global Insight for The United States Conference of Mayors and the Mayors Climate ProtectionCenter, published some interesting insights about the wind industry.The report states that “The bulk of jobs related to wind infrastructure will come in the manufacturing ofequipment. The technology of wind electricity is relatively new, but the manufacturing base for its productionis very similar to past products. Every state in the country has firms and a labor force with experience makingproducts similar to the blades, gearboxes, brakes, hubs, cooling fans, couplings, drives, cases, bearings,generators, towers, and sensors that make up a wind tower.” page 2
  42. 42. “These jobs fall into the familiar durable manufacturing sectors of plastics and rubber, primary metals,fabricated metal products, machinery, computer and electronic products, and electrical equipment. Citiesacross the country have the capacity to attract job growth in these important manufacturing sectors along thenation’s path to a new energy infrastructure.” page 3
  43. 43. March 2, 2011Ecotech Institute Applauds Colorado for its Leadership in the Cleantech IndustryI recently came across a fantastic report published by the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation.The report evaluates Colorado’s energy industry in two subclusters: (1) fossil fuels and (2) cleantech, whichincludes companies that use renewable energy sources and materials such as solar, wind, biomass and greentransportation.Of course, as president of Ecotech Institute, the first and only college entirely dedicated to renewable energyand sustainable design, I was thrilled with the cleantech statistics in the state we call home.Because the report is so robust, this recap is truly an opportunity to call out data and facts that illustrate whyColorado is a hub for cleantech activity, where thousands of jobs and a promising future in the green landscapeexist. It’s great to see that government funding, public policy and private industry are all supporting Colorado’sgrowth as a leader in the cleantech space.Below I have highlighted some great statistics and have pulled bulleted information verbatim from the report.To download the full report to get more details on the bright future of the Colorado cleantech industry, visit:http://www.metrodenver.org/industries-companies/industries/energy.html.JOBSColorado is a leader in the cleantech subcluster and has seen a large jump in the number of related jobs. Infact, while cleantech jobs increased nationally by about 10 percent in the last five years, that number soared tomore than 30 percent in Colorado. Much of that growth was in wind and solar energy companies.Key findings: • The cleantech subcluster directly employed about 19,420 people in Colorado in 2010. • With nearly 54,100 energy workers in approximately 3,570 companies in 2010, the state continues to position itself as a hub of energy industry activity in both the fossil fuels and cleantech sectors. • About 1,600 cleantech companies operated in Colorado in 2010. • The number of Colorado cleantech companies increased 9.6 percent between 2005 and 2010, compared with 4.2 percent growth nationally. • According to Headwaters Economics, the number of cleantech jobs in Colorado increased 30 percent from 1995 to 2007, or about 17,000 jobs. The study cited more than $796 million in venture capital investments that bolstered Colorado’s green economy between 1999 and 2008.NEW COMPANIESIn 2010, more than a dozen companies chose Colorado as the place to develop new wind and solar projects.According to a study by professors at Arizona State University, Colorado ranked as the second-most attractivelocation for businesses hoping to export solar power. When it comes to wind, Colorado is one of six statesthat generate more than five percent of total electricity from wind, according to the American Wind Energy page Association.
  44. 44. Some of the wind company announcements in 2010 include: • Vestas Technology RD located a research and development center in Louisville. The new center focuses on improving wind turbine efficiency and reducing energy costs and will employ engineers, scientists, and support staff. • New York-based American Zephyr Corp. relocated its distribution, sales, and support center to Louisville. Within the next few years, the company plans to manufacture all of its wind turbine parts locally, rather than importing its parts from outside the U.S. • Broomfield-based Renewable Energy Systems (RES) Americas unveiled plans for a windpower complex in eastern Colorado. Located in Lincoln and Elbert Counties, the Cedar Point Wind Project will be the second-largest wind farm in the state and will use Vestas wind turbines for the project. The finished project should generate enough energy to power 68,000 homes. • Vestas will expand its U.S. presence when it opens its second blade factory in Brighton in 2011. The Windsor blade factory opened in March 2008, followed by the nacelle factory in Brighton and the world’s largest tower factory in Pueblo in 2010. Combined, the four manufacturing facilities, which are located on three campuses in Brighton, Windsor, and Pueblo, represent an investment of about $1 billion in the state since 2007. The company plans to double its workforce in the next year to fulfill turbine order demands and expand annual production capacity. In addition, Vestas announced a $2.5 million, 80-acre expansion to the company’s Windsor manufacturing facility that will serve as storage space for wind blades.Some of the solar company new announcements in 2010 include: • SMA Solar Technology AG, the largest solar inverter manufacturer in the world, was named “Deal of the Year” award winner in 2010 by the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation. The Germany- based company was recognized for its significant economic impact to the region through capital investment and job creation. In 2010, the company hired 200 workers at its northeast Denver plant and could add up to 500 more positions by the end of 2011. • North Carolina-based power company Cogentrix Energy LLC plans to build the world’s largest concentrated photovoltaic power plant north of Alamosa. The 225-acre power facility will utilize lens- based technology that could power up to 6,500 homes. • SkyFuel, Inc. relocated its corporate headquarters from Albuquerque to Arvada. The company’s parabolic solar power collector research and development center is already located in Jefferson County and the company cited its proximity to National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Colorado’s growing cleantech environment as key factors in their location decision. • California-based SunPower Corp. and Colorado Springs Utility are building a 6-MW solar Power facility at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The 30-acre project is slated for completion by 2011.FUNDINGColorado continues to be a hub for energy-related venture capital and ranks as one of the top five states interms of capital generated for energy-related projects. • Through 2010, federal stimulus support designated more than $768 million to Colorado for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, including funding for energy tax incentives for individuals and businesses in Colorado through the State Energy Program. • The combination of Colorado’s Renewable Energy Standard of 30 percent by 2020 and production tax credits demonstrates Colorado’s commitment to renewable energy technology development and research. Former Colorado Governor Bill Ritter unveiled the Governor’s Energy Office Revolving Loan Program and the Green Colorado Credit Reserve Program, both stimulus-funded loan programs aimed page

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