Eating Recovery Center 2013 Clipbook

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Eating Recovery Center 2013 Clipbook

  1. 1. Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2013
  2. 2. Table of Contents January.................................................................................................. **Digital Outreach: pages 4 & 12 February................................................................................................. **Digital Outreach: pages 22 & 23 March..................................................................................................... **Digital Outreach: pages 41-43 April........................................................................................................ **Digital Outreach: n/a May.......................................................................................................... **Digital Outreach: pages 64 & 65 June........................................................................................................ **Digital Outreach: pages 81 & 82 July......................................................................................................... **Digital Outreach: pages 88 & 89 page 4 to 12 page 14 to 34 page 35 to 46 page 48 to 56 page 58 to 75 page 77 to 83 page 85 to 92
  3. 3. January 2013
  4. 4. page 4 Eating Recovery Center Encourages Americans to Shift the Focus of Their Resolutions from “Looking Better” to “Feeling Better” Americans’ top 2013 New Year’s resolution is to become more physically fit and the fourth most popular resolution is to lose weight, according to a recent survey published by Franklin Covey. Because dieting and over-exercise are two activities that commonly contribute to the development of eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center, an international center providing comprehensive treatment for eating disorders, cautions against diving headfirst into a resolution focused on reducing body size, particularly for individuals with a family history of eating disorders. “Eating disorders have a strong genetic component, and seemingly harmless – even seemingly healthy – New Year’s diet, exercise and weight loss regimens can quickly spiral out of control, especially for someone who has a family history of disordered eating thoughts and behaviors,” said Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, clinical director of the adult partial hospitalization program at Eating Recovery Center. To reduce risks for eating disorders development related to 2013 weight loss goals, Eating Recovery Center recommends turning the focus away from changing perceived shortcomings in appearance and instead focusing on prioritizing the things in life that you value. More often than not, these resolutions emphasize how you feel rather than how you look, and can include: 1. Be more kind and compassionate to yourself. Practice at least one method of self-care daily, even if you have to schedule it into your day. Pamper yourself with a hot bath, a yoga class or a manicure, or simply spend some time journaling or practicing a hobby that brings joy or special value to your life. 2. Treat yourself as you treat others. Make a point to practice the “golden rule” on yourself. Try to not be as hard on yourself this year, and remember that you deserve happiness, just like everyone else. 3. Try one new activity or take one small risk each month. Gradually approach your fears and try new experiences in life to broaden opportunities for enjoyment and engagement with others. 4. Ask for help more often. Do not be afraid to let someone know when you need a shoulder to lean on, a supportive ear to talk to or even just a friendly hug. Although others may not be able to “fix” your struggles, you do not have to be alone as you explore your feelings and frustrations. 5. Take time to appreciate the beauty around you. Practice mindfulness and commit to being present in the moment. Celebrate the wonders of the world around you by spending time in nature or with supportive family and friends, both of which can be grounding and peaceful when you feel stressed and chaotic. While New Year’s resolutions that emphasize feeling good over looking good can support a life of balance, not all appearance-focused resolutions are harmful or dangerous. However, severely restricting calories to an unhealthy level, engaging in an excessive and rigid exercise regimen, withdrawing from family and friends, displaying extreme anxiety about gaining weight or “being fat,” or bingeing and purging behaviors in the pursuit of a weight loss-centric resolution can indicate the development of an eating disorder. January 3, 2013 Weight Loss Resolutions Can Lead to Eating Disorders | Digital Outreach
  5. 5. page 5 “If a friend or loved one begins exhibiting troubling weight loss behaviors in the execution of his or her New Year’s resolutions, it is important to seek help as quickly as possible,” said Brennan. “Early intervention significantly increases the chances of lasting eating disorders recovery.” For more information about eating disorders treatment resources, visit EatingRecoveryCenter.com. Many people who develop eating disorders can cite triggering factors: a major life change, a particularly stressful time or a weight loss that resulted in very positive feedback from those around them. Oftentimes, for these individuals, genes load the gun and life circumstances pull the trigger that sends them into disordered eating territory. What many people do not know is that, for certain individuals with a genetic predisposition for eating disorders, struggling with an injury or battling a sickness can be eating disorder triggers as well. Injury as an eating disorder trigger Active individuals who enjoy filling their lives with sports and other physical activities can be thrown off track when injured. Suddenly the daily activities they have come to know and love are no longer possible—at least for the time being. For those with a genetic predisposition to eating disorders, they may start to feel conflicted on how their bodies appear with less physical activity, and may struggle with body image issues and even disordered eating behaviors. If these feelings of discomfort persist, individuals may engage in restricting calories or purging after meals to counteract their lack of usual physical activity. For collegiate and professional athletes, so much of their lives revolve around their sports. With practices, off-season training and games or competitions, there is not much time left for other activities. If these individuals, who define their lives by their sports, experience a game-changing injury, and they have the genetic predisposition to an eating disorder, it can create a slippery slope. Once injured, these individuals may turn to eating disordered behaviors to cope with their change in persona. In this case, warning signs of eating disorders in athletes may become apparent after they have stopped playing their sport. Illness as an eating disorder trigger Pneumonia, cancer and other intense illnesses can take a toll on an individual’s body and leave him or her feeling exhausted and weaker than expected. As individuals struggle with illnesses, they may experience unusually high weight loss for a variety of reasons. As these individuals begin to feel better and regain their health, they may hear from friends and loved ones – even strangers – that they “look great” or are “looking so thin.” These types of comments may strike a nerve, and if a latent predisposition exists, could trigger an eating disorder as these individuals strive to maintain a thin ideal and extend the positive commentary on their appearance. “In addition to the positive reinforcement these individuals are receiving, there’s also an internal mechanism that occurs when people starve themselves,” explains Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDS, founding partner and medical director of adult services at Eating Recovery Center. “Eating disorders patients are often quite anxious, but when they’re restricting their caloric intake, it triggers a sense of relief and escape. January 9, 2013 Could an illness or injury be an eating disorder trigger? | Julie Holland
  6. 6. page 6 It’s difficult for these individuals to go back the other way; you could almost say they’re addicted to that feeling of relief.” “What causes eating disorders?” may never be fully answerable, but having an understanding of potential eating disorder triggers, warning signs and symptoms can help individuals who find themselves struggling with an eating disorder seek treatment early, fostering a better chance for lasting recovery. Share your comments about eating disorders triggers below and subscribe to receive updates on new articles. Eating disorders do not discriminate. Regardless of gender, skin color, religion or income, these potentially deadly illnesses can have detrimental physical, emotional and mental effects. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals are not immune to eating disorders either. In fact, according to some studies, gay men are more likely to have an eating disorder than straight men due to increased pressure to meet physical standards that are often considered more “attractive” within the gay community.* Eating disorders among the LGBT community For some gay men, eating disorders may develop as an outcome of sexual repression. These intense feelings of conflict translate into being dissatisfied with one’s own physical body. Unfortunately, some gay individuals are shamed for who they are by family, friends or colleagues, and often times, they use disordered eating behaviors as a means for taking control of something when their lives feel chaotic. Feldman and Meyer cite the sociocultural perspective as a “prominent explanation for the high prevalence of eating disorders among gay and bisexual men” in their 2007 study, “Eating Disorders in Diverse Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Populations.”** According to the study, gay and bisexual men have been found to have the same weight and body image pressures and expectations when it comes to relationships as straight women; thus they experience similar unrealistic body ideals. Disordered eating behaviors then develop as an attempt to attain these ideals or cope with confusion often surrounding sexual orientation. Lesbian and bisexual women may not have the same body image pressures as gay men, as these two groups tend to have differing viewpoints on ideal body image. However, gay women often have similar struggles with sexual orientation and a desire to be accepted in society as a whole, and can engage in disordered eating thoughts and behaviors as a means to manage their anxiety. LGBT adolescents are especially at risk Adolescents and young adults who struggle with sexual orientation are especially at risk for eating disorders as they cope with “coming out,” being accepted by their families and fitting in with their peers. A 2009 study by researchers at Harvard University and Children’s Hospital Boston examined the correlation between sexual orientation and binge eating and purging.*** Among the findings were heightened rates of binge eating among both males and females who identified themselves as gay, lesbian, bisexual or “mostly heterosexual.” As is true with most adolescents, the body image ideals and expectations of teenagers identifying as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender are significantly impacted by the media. Some segments of the LGBT community and gay media place a hyper-focus on an unattainable body image and idealize stylists and the fashion and beauty industries, which are all highly body-conscious. January 23, 2013 Eating disorders, body image and the LGBT community | Julie Holland
  7. 7. page 7 Although a direct and definite relationship between eating disorders and LGBT individuals has yet to be seen in research studies, it is no doubt the isolation and victimization many of these individuals unfortunately experience as they come out that often translates into disordered eating behaviors as a coping mechanism. What this means for the LGBT community All of this research about eating disorders and body image issues within the LGBT community stresses the importance for clinicians and healthcare professionals working with these individuals to be aware of eating disorders warning signs and symptoms. Eating disorders may be the deadliest mental illness, but with early intervention and the appropriate treatment, men, women and children alike can experience lasting recovery. Comment below with your questions about eating disorders, body image or related issues. ---- *http://www.everydayhealth.com/eating-disorders/men-and-eating-disorders.... **http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2080655/pdf/nihms32619.pdf *** http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/09/17/us-eating-disorders-idUSTRE58G... January 14, 2013 Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) Explained | Dr. Ken Weiner Eating disorders are becoming more complex. Researchers and treatment professionals aren’t really sure what’s behind this increasing complexity, although it’s often suggested that a thin-obsessed media and heightened digital access to endless information about diet, exercise and achieving the “perfect body” are -- at least in part -- fueling creativity in disordered thoughts and behaviors. This complexity means that the women, men and children with eating disorders are presenting with more medical and psychiatric comorbidities, and associated behaviors and phobias are often more severe.[1] A byproduct of this evolving eating disorders pathology came in the early ‘90s when the mental health community acknowledged that the two official eating disorders diagnoses currently in place, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, were inadequate to describe the diverse presentation of individuals with disordered eating and related issues. Both illnesses had a very clear set of symptoms outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and while many patients continued to display the traditional characteristics of the two illnesses, a growing subset were atypical. For example, loss of menstruation is among the diagnostic criteria for anorexia, so what was a health care professional to make of the severely low-weighted patient with all the requisite signs and symptoms of anorexia except that she still had a menstrual period? Or what about the patient that concedes to bingeing and purging once a week over a period of two months? Do they not technically have an eating disorder if the threshold criteria dictate there must be at least two binge/purge episodes per week for longer than three months to warrant a diagnosis of bulimia? These patients clearly have serious eating and body weight-related disorders, but which kind? Without an official diagnosis, eating disorders treatment professionals struggled to address these illnesses, while patients and families often struggled to secure insurance coverage for treatment in the higher levels of care.
  8. 8. page 8 As a result, eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) was made an official diagnosis in the fourth edition of the DSM to be a “catch-all” of sorts, a clinical category of disordered eating meant for those who clearly suffer from serious thoughts and behaviors but don’t meet all the diagnostic criteria for another specific diagnosis. Individuals with EDNOS experience severe disturbances in their eating behaviors, such as extreme reduction of food intake, overeating, use of purging mechanisms (vomiting, laxative use or over-exercising), and often have feelings of extreme distress or concern about body weight or shape. Today, EDNOS diagnoses significantly outnumber cases of anorexia and bulimia. In fact, Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention reported findings that suggest EDNOS develops in 4 to 6 percent of the general population, with 50 to 70 percent of the individuals who present for treatment of an eating disorder being diagnosed with this illness. Dr. Ovidio Bermudez, a colleague at Eating Recovery Center and one of the world’s foremost experts on eating disorders, has said in regards to the evolution of disordered eating thoughts, behaviors and diagnoses: “The atypical has become the typical.” Despite being the most common diagnosis among individuals seeking eating disorders treatment, EDNOS is widely misunderstood. There’s a common misconception floating around that EDNOS is somehow less serious than other eating disorder diagnoses, and that individuals with atypical symptoms and behaviors suffer less than their counterparts with anorexia or bulimia. The reality is that EDNOS can potentially be just as serious and life-threatening. In my experience, EDNOS can be particularly dangerous because these eating disorders more commonly go undiagnosed by health care professionals for longer periods of time due to lack of awareness or inexperience with “other” eating disorders. During this prolonged period of time before diagnosis and appropriate treatment is sought, the medical, psychological and sociocultural symptoms have time to intensify and can sometimes become life-threatening for men, women and children with eating disorder not otherwise specified. To chat live with a master’s-level eating disorders therapist about EDNOS concerns, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. References: [1] “Program Design Supporting Emerging Eating Disorder Pathology in Children and Adolescents,” The Road to Recovery, Volume 1, Issue 4, July 2011. For more by Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., FAED, CEDS, click here. For more on eating disorders, click here. If you’re struggling with an eating disorder, call the National Eating Disorders helpline at 1-800-931-2237. January 30, 2013 The Role of Values in Eating Disorders Treatment | Dr. Ken Weiner The women, men and children struggling with eating disorders have world-class anxiety, and they use their eating-disordered thoughts and behaviors to manage their anxiety. As a result, addressing anxiety is key to effective intervention and sustainable recovery. The treatment community has found that an effective way to address anxiety in eating disordered patients is through the use of values.[1] When we talk about values, we’re not only identifying what patients value, but evaluating whether their eating disorder is helping them work toward the things that are important to them, or if it’s actually keeping them from living their values and achieving their goals.
  9. 9. page 9 Unfortunately, it’s usually the latter outcome, which presents an opportunity for eating disorders treatment professionals to help demonstrate a path for recovery that aligns with the things in life that these patients hold dear. A thought leader on the role of values in eating disorders treatment is Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, FAED, CEDS, medical director of adult services at Eating Recovery Center. Below, he answers common questions around the use of values-based anxiety management in eating disorders recovery. How do values assist in anxiety management? Oftentimes, individuals use destructive thoughts or behaviors to self-soothe and “escape” painful thoughts, feelings or experiences. Values-based anxiety management is when we work with anxious patients to identify what they value in life and help them see how their values can trump their anxiety. It’s all about understanding that there are things that they value more in life -- family or intimate relationships, education, professional success, honesty, spirituality and the like -- than escaping their anxiety. How does values-based anxiety management help people with eating disorders? Eating-disordered individuals manage their anxiety with an eating disorder, be it anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). They’d much rather find an escape mechanism -- such as eating disordered behaviors -- than deal with their anxiety. However, managing anxiety with an eating disorder keeps anxiety between patients and what they value. To understand the role of values in eating disorders treatment, it’s important to acknowledge a few key characteristics about the minds of patients struggling with these illnesses. In general, they display traits of anxiety, rigidity and inability to see “the big picture.” And it’s these traits that maintain eating disorders and keep patients from identifying and living their values. Because traits don’t change, we have to help patients manage the traits that they cannot readily eliminate and “play the hand they’ve been dealt.” From a biological perspective, eating-disordered patients have starving brains with significantly less activity in the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that allows them to see the “big picture.”[2] Additionally, intense anxiety from the amygdala -- the emotional brain -- further inhibits the prefrontal cortex, making it difficult for eating- disordered individuals to maintain a self-observing stance and think critically about how they’re living out their values, particularly when thinking about sensitive topics like food and body size. Eating disorders are phobic disorders; therefore, we have to challenge the phobia and support patients in confronting their fears. To do so, we must find something they value more than their eating disorder, something that’s so important to them that it overrides this anxiety. Because eating disorders patients generally have low self-directedness, values identification gives patients something to direct their lives towards. Here’s a good example. I worked with a woman who was continually delaying her wedding because she couldn’t imagine getting married while still struggling with her eating disorder. I helped her question her actions and determine whether they were helping her live her values or not. I asked her, “You’ve had this bulimia for over 20 years, but do you value this relationship with your fiancé? If you value this relationship, then you can’t let the eating disorder stand in the way of moving this relationship forward.” Once she was able to connect with her deeply-held value of protecting and nurturing her bond with her fiancé, she was able to give up the bulimic behaviors in order to fully pursue the relationship. How are values used in the eating disorders treatment environment? Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an intervention that hinges on values identification and the use of values to address the anxiety management component of the illness.[1] This behavioral therapy moves away from the notion of “changing cognitions” and eliminating those that elicit anxiety, and toward
  10. 10. page 10 how people can live a valued life in the presence of negative thoughts and feelings. The goal of ACT is to help patients create a rich and meaningful life while accepting the pain that inevitably goes with it. To help patients identify their values, we often use “The Valued Living Questionnaire” by Kelly Wilson, Ph.D. This tool allows patients to really articulate what they value in life, and look critically at how well they’ve lived those values in the past and present. Joanne Steinwachs, LCSW, created a series of values flashcards that have also been helpful in getting patients to reflect on and identify the thoughts, feelings and achievements they value through brainstorming. Another way to think about the use of values in the treatment environment is that we’re trying to change the patient’s “job description” from an “anxiety manager” to a “values director.” Patients strive to focus on their values versus escaping and avoiding anxiety through disordered eating behaviors. Visit Eating Recovery Center’s website for more information about values and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in eating disorders treatment. References: [1] “The Use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the Treatment of Eating Disorders,” delivered on August 20, 2011 by Enola Gorham, LCSW, CEDS, Clinical Director of Adult Services at Eating Recovery Center, at the Rocky Mountain Eating Disorders Conference. View session here. [2] “Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Eating Disorders: A New Adjunct to Treatment,” delivered on August 3, 2012 by Emmett R. Bishop, MD, FAED, CEDS, Medical Director of Adult Services at Eating Recovery Center, at the Eating Recovery Center Foundation Eating Disorders Conference. View session here. For more by Kenneth L. Weiner, M.D., FAED, CEDS, click here. For more on eating disorders, click here. If you’re struggling with an eating disorder, call the National Eating Disorders helpline at 1-800-931-2237. January 18, 2013 Are You Teaching Your Child to Diet? | Bonnie Brennan 4 steps to helping your kids feel good about their bodies and eating well Flipping the calendar provides many of us with the motivation to reinvent ourselves, which often manifests in the form of a New Year’s resolution. While motivations may be well- intentioned, attempts to change weight or body size could lead to a negative body image and the adoption of unhealthy weight loss regimens. Some people who implement weight-loss or body-focused resolutions may recognize the dangers associated with doing so – including fad diets, over-exercise and in some cases, the development of an eating disorder – most fail to
  11. 11. page 11 acknowledge the negative impact these resolutions can have on their children. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), more than half of teenage girls and a third of teenage boys rely on unhealthy weight control behaviors. These behaviors are only amplified at the start of the new year with the overwhelming presence of weight-loss themed resolutions. Thomson Reuters and National Public Radio confirmed the popularity of these types of resolutions with a recent poll, which found that one- third of Americans have made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight in the last five years. The overabundance of weight-loss focused goals in the early months of a new year makes it increasingly important for parents to pursue their resolutions in a healthy manner in order to promote a positive body image and self-concept among their children. These four strategies can help parents model healthy behaviors to their children in the new year and minimize the risk of children developing disordered eating habits. 1. Minimize dieting habits. Though dieting may be the go-to weight loss regimen, this sort of eating is not practical for children. Rather than giving up certain foods or entire food groups, make New Year’s resolutions that focus on moderation and incorporate healthy, well- balanced meals for the entire family. 2. Make exercise fun. Sighing at the mere mention of the gym is not an effective means of promoting a healthy lifestyle. Get away from stationary workout machines by making a New Year’s resolution to simply get outside more often. Plan a family hike or bike outing or get together with others in the neighborhood to play a game of kickball or volleyball. 3. Limit “fat talk.” It is no secret that children often mimic their parents’ behaviors. Negative commentary about your appearance, known as “fat talk,” is no exception. Make a New Year’s resolution to avoid negative comments and instead, make a point to offer comments that convey confidence and positivity in regards to your own body image and that of your children as well. 4. Be conscientious when commenting on the appearance of others. Both criticism and compliments can suggest that there are “good” and “bad” body shapes and sizes. Make a New Year’s resolution to avoid these types of comments in order to help children develop their own positive definition of beauty. Remember, it is not how your body looks in the mirror, but what your body does for you that matters. An important note: Eating disorders have a strong genetic component. Therefore, children with a family history of anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder can have an increased susceptibility to disordered eating behaviors and body image issues. Regardless of family history, parents should be mindful of how their own comments and actions may affect their children—particularly during this weight-focused time of year. Early recognition of eating disorders warning signs can increase a child’s chances of lasting recovery. Should a child demonstrate any sort of troubling food or body image behaviors that may indicate disordered eating, parents are encouraged to seek treatment from a qualified eating disorders professional.
  12. 12. page 12 January 29, 2013 Childhood Stress and Eating Disorders | Digital Outreach Stress among children and adolescents is on the rise, and mental health professionals are seeing the impact as more families seek treatment for their children and adolescents to address stress-initiated behavioral illnesses such as eating disorders. Due to the connection between anxiety and stress-initiated mental illnesses like eating disorders, Eating Recovery Center encourages parents to take proactive steps to understand the impact of stress on their children, identify events and situations that may induce stress and recognize patterns of thinking and behavior that may indicate anxiety: 1. Childhood stress generally fits into one of four categories: personal, interpersonal, interfamilial and global (a stress reaction to national or world news). 2. Children of all ages are vulnerable to the effects of stress. Although they may internalize stress differently, children at different ages – from toddlers to teenagers – can all suffer from anxiety. 3. There is no universal response to stress. Children at different developmental stages and under different life circumstances will respond to stress differently. 4. The burden of stress is cumulative. Just like adults, children and adolescents can only “take so much,” and multiple stressors can become increasingly difficult for a young person to manage. 5. Even positive change can be stressful. For children and adolescents, change can be difficult, even perceived positive changes such as starting at a new school or joining a new sports team. To help parents minimize stress in their children, Eating Recovery Center recommends following these four guidelines: 1. Be aware of your own stress as a parent and recognize how your words and actions can directly or indirectly affect your child. 2. Make yourself available to discuss their perceptions of stressful situations. 3. Talk to your children if you feel that something is causing them anxiety; do not wait for them to vocalize their feelings to you. 4. Provide age-appropriate information regarding their questions or concerns. For more information about eating disorders treatment resources, visit EatingRecoveryCenter.com.
  13. 13. February 2013
  14. 14. page 14 February 1, 2013 Does Your Child Have an Eating Disorder? 8 Warning Signs | Dr. Elizabeth Easton Warning Signs Your Child or Teen May be Dealing with an Eating Disorder Previously, it was believed that eating disorders were “a teenage girl’s” disease. However, this is no longer the case. More men and boys, as well as younger and younger children, are seeking treatment for eating disorders and concerns. About 35-37% of adolescent girls engage in crash dieting, fasting, self-induced vomiting, or take diet pills or laxatives, reports the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). Even more frightening is the fact that 42% of first- through third-grade girls say that they want to be thinner. That’s right, while learning multiplication tables and tallying money, kids are now consumed with counting calories. These facts are shocking, and still, many people -- and parents -- are unaware of how prevalent and serious eating disorders are for young children, tweens and teenagers. Parents have a crucial role in educating themselves about eating disorders and body image issues and identifying possible warning signs, which could indicate the presence of an eating disorder in their child or adolescent. Here are some of the most common warning signs that a child or teen potentially has an eating disorder. - Dramatic weight loss or drastic fluctuations - A preoccupation with weight, food, food labels and dieting - Excessive drinking of fluids or denial of hunger - Avoidance of meal times and situations involving food - Withdrawal from friends and activities - Self-induced vomiting or abuse of laxatives, diuretics or diet pills -Excessive, rigid exercise regimen -A change in dress, such as over-sized clothing to cover the body or revealing clothes to flaunt weight loss As a parent, if you become concerned about your child’s eating behaviors or extreme focus on body image, it is important to address the issue early on. Intervene sooner rather than later, and help your child seek treatment and experience lasting recovery if you and your doctors deem it appropriate. If you suspect your child has an eating disorder, your immediate focus should be his or her health, opening lines of communication and initiating a conversation.
  15. 15. page 15 Here is how you can start. Avoid making accusations. Rather than suggesting your child’s eating habits may be worrisome, ask direct questions. For example, “I’ve noticed you haven’t been eating dessert lately. Is there a reason you’re doing that?” Be supportive. Emphasize that your child is not in trouble, but that you are concerned and want to be there for support. Be firm. If you are worried about your child’s health to the point he or she needs to see a doctor, tell your child what is going to happen. For example, “This morning, we’re going to talk to a doctor about your health.” Seek qualified resources. Your family’s physician, your child’s pediatrician or a local eating disorders treatment center can provide useful information to help you better understand eating disorders and to help you determine the most appropriate treatment option for your child. If your child does develop an eating disorder, try not to shoulder the blame yourself. Eating disorders are complex mental illnesses stemming from a variety of contributing factors; they are not any one person’s – or parent’s – fault. Being able to recognize the warning signs and be an active part of eating disorders treatment will help provide an environment conducive to the recovery process. Although the supermodels, actresses and reality TV stars who frequently grace the covers of leading fashion and lifestyle magazines have only reinforced the universal desirability of a stick-thin figure, some celebrities are teaming up to promote healthy body image. Jennifer Hudson and Jessica Simpson: Role-modeling healthy attitudes about body image Neither Hudson nor Simpson has made her struggle with weight and wanting to feel comfortable in her own skin a secret. In fact, both Hudson and Simpson have publicly addressed their life-long struggles with weight and body image and both focus on weight loss as an ongoing lifestyle change, rather than something that happens overnight. “Permanent weight loss doesn’t come with an on and off switch. It is not something you do for a little while and think it is going to change your body,” Hudson explained in an interview with Good Housekeeping.* This healthy lifestyle outlook along with both stars’ undeniable confidence is among the many reasons Simpson and Hudson are considered to be healthy body image role models for women. Though Simpson in particular was quite thin at one point in her career, she and Hudson today both reiterate the importance of avoiding dangerous weight-loss tactics that could develop into disordered eating behaviors such as fad diets, restricting calories or purging after meals. February 5, 2013 Defying Hollywood norms: Celebs promote body image & eating disorders awareness | Julie Holland
  16. 16. page 16 Prior to the birth of her daughter, Simpson posed nude on the cover of Elle, exposing herself physically and emotionally for the entire world. However, Simpson’s confidence in her body was palatable when the issue hit stands in April 2012. Never citing she was perfect, Simpson was merely proud and excited to meet her then soon-to-arrive baby girl. Emme Aronson and Demi Lovato: Promoting eating disorders awareness Singer, actress and “X Factor” judge Lovato promotes eating disorders awareness through her positive way of addressing the aggressive media exposure surrounding her previous struggles with disordered eating. “I started overeating when I was about eight; I was a binge eater. I would bake a whole plate of cookies and eat them all. Then when I turned 12 I was bullied in school and they called me fat. I went from being an overeater to stopping eating and I lost about 30 pounds. From then on I continued under eating, but my weight plateaued,” she said in an interview with The Daily Mail.** The former Disney Channel star also has recently disclosed that she currently resides in a sober living house in the Los Angeles area during “X Factor’s” most recent season in order to situate herself in an environment conducive to ongoing eating disorders recovery. As Lovato suggests in the lyrics of her song “Skyscraper,” it necessitates a certain kind of strength to overcome any kind of body image issue. This strength can be found in a multitude of different healing processes, like that of a sober living house, artistic expression and ongoing support from an outpatient treatment team. Lovato hopes to encourage women facing these kinds of issues to find the strength to undergo the measures necessary for a full recovery. Unlike Lovato, plus-size model Emme Aronson has never personally dealt with an eating disorder. However, her appearance has been the source of much criticism from those who deem protruding rib cages and collarbones to be the “ideal” figure. In spite of her critics, this size 14 model is proud of her full figure. “It is unhealthy to say that women have to live up to this image that is super-thin, prepubescent and unsafe,” Aronson explained in an interview with RadarOnline.com. “The disparity between what is real and what is shown to us is unobtainable.”*** Her views on realistic body image, along with Aronson’s commitment to supporting eating disorders awareness nonprofits, make Aronson a positive body image role model for adolescents and young adults whose views of “normal” have been skewed as a result of the media’s biased depiction of beauty. Media and healthy body image When a celebrity steps away from the “thin ideal” often seen in the media and promotes the idea of being comfortable in one’s own skin, enjoying your body for what it does and not what it looks like, it can help adolescents and young adults embrace their bodies—whatever the shape or size. Additionally, while the media is often criticized for portrayal of certain thin celebrity bodies as “ideal,” it is important to be a critical consumer of media and question the images, rather than simply accepting unrealistic and potentially triggering photos and messages at face value. If you become concerned about a friend or loved one’s body image or weight loss behaviors, reach out to him or her and offer support and encourage him or her to seek treatment from a qualified professional. “Like” this article if you support healthy weight-loss tactics and a healthy body image, and share your comments and insights below. ---- *http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/family/celebrity-interviews/jennifer-hud... **http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/02/demi-lovato-joined-national-eat... ***http://radaronline.com/exclusives/2012/01/plus-size-model-emme-fashion-i...
  17. 17. page 17 Earlier this month, New York Fashion Week 2013 showcased the latest fashion trends from some of the world’s top designers. And not surprisingly, the conversation about whether or not the models are too thin and/or promoting an unattainable “thin ideal” continued. The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) has already taken a stand to prevent eating disorders and foster a positive body image for the models at fashion week through its Health Initiative,* which emphasizes that “health is beauty.” To promote this healthy lifestyle concept, CFDA’s Health Initiative encourages designers and others involved with fashion week to: • Develop workshops for individuals involved in the fashion industry (i.e. models and their families) to raise awareness about eating disorders, including common warning signs, complications and treatment options. • Provide healthy meals and snacks backstage at Fashion Week and at related activities. • Offer fitness and nutrition education. Although the Health Initiative does not require designers participate in or adhere to its proposed guidelines, it is still an important step toward making healthful change and raising awareness about eating disorders and body image issues in an incredibly body-conscious industry. It is possible that these guidelines can help spur a cultural change that creates movement toward embracing beautiful clothes that fit bodies of all shapes and sizes. An increasing number of clothing lines are now catering to individuals with curvier figures, and they often feature plus size models in their advertising and runway shows. This diversification encourages fashion trends to empower and inspire. Ann Nahari, Los Angeles-based plus size fashion brand, planned to do just that during Fashion Week 2013. “Plus size women are beautiful and deserve to be seen as such. Why shouldn’t they have the option to buy clothing which reflects that they are beautiful, stylish and chic?” said Sumiyyah Rasheed, Ann Nahari founder and head designer, in a press release** announcing the brand’s first presentation in the United States. Christina Mendez, plus model who prides herself on helping others be a “happy, curvy you,” walked alongside “typically sized” models at this year’s New York Fashion Week for Adrian Alicea Haute Couture, bringing a different figure to the runways. “I am truly honored Adrian Alicea selected me to represent ‘Couture Curves’,” said Mendez in an article on Daily Venus Diva.*** “With Adrian integrating a plus model alongside straight-sized models, he’s showcasing the beauty of fashion for everyone during New York Fashion Week.” By not limiting the sizes of clothing on display on models at fashion week to the very thin, the everyday consumer is likely to feel less pressure to achieve a certain shape and size in order to wear the latest fashion trends. While adjusting society’s definitions of “healthy” and “beautiful” will not happen overnight, these small steps in an industry that is notoriously concerned with thinness will hopefully provide a shift in the way individuals view, think and talk about their bodies. February 20, 2013 Plus size clothing lines at Fashion Week 2013 encourage positive body image | Julie Holland
  18. 18. page 18 If you are concerned a friend or loved one may be struggling with an eating disorder or negative body image, visit Eating Recovery Center’s website to confidentially chat with a member of the Clinical Assessment Team to gain insight and learn what you can do to help. Share this article to help raise awareness about eating disorders and courage positive body image for everyone! ----- *http://cfda.com/programs/cfda-health-initiative **http://nyprdiva.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/the-plus-size-fashion-revolutio... ***http://dailyvenusdiva.com/2013/02/07/plus-model-christina-mendez-to-walk... In a world of cause marketing and aggressive campaign promotion, it can sometimes feel as though every week or month is devoted to some kind of “awareness.” However, I urge you to acknowledge National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (NEDAW), which is taking place this week (February 25 through March 2). Each year during the last week of February, individuals of all walks of life touched by eating disorders—including men, women and children currently struggling with these illnesses, those living a life of recovery, friends and loved ones, as well as professionals specializing in eating disorders treatment—come together to raise awareness about these complex illnesses, which are estimated to affect tens of millions of Americans. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), in the United States alone, 20 million women and 10 million men will suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The enormity and far-reaching implications of this statistic are perhaps what laid the foundation for the theme of this year’s National Eating Disorders Awareness Week: “Everybody Knows Somebody.” Whether it be a close friend, colleague, relative or just an acquaintance, everyone probably knows at least one of these 30+ million individuals who are currently struggling with or have recovered from some form of an eating disorder. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week seeks to educate Americans about eating disorders, reduce the stigma surrounding these illnesses and improve access to treatment resources. Year after year, these efforts are becoming increasingly prevalent and powerful. In fact, NEDA reports that last year’s National Eating Disorders Awareness Week helped to nearly double traffic to its eating disorders helpline. Additionally, NEDAW 2012 provided a critical platform through which eating disorders experts were able to educate our nation’s leaders about these illnesses at the Bi-Partisan National Eating Disorders Awareness Caucus on February 27, 2012, on Capitol Hill.* February 25, 2013 Everybody knows somebody: National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013 | Julie Holland
  19. 19. page 19 While National Eating Disorders Awareness Week offers individuals from all walks of life an opportunity to learn about these illnesses and prevention efforts, the concept encourages participants to continue to raise eating disorders awareness throughout the entire year and perhaps even serve as an eating disorders resource for friends or loved ones who may be facing disordered eating or body image issues. Participating in National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013 is simple—just visit the websites of eating disorders treatment centers or non-profit organizations in your area to learn about community events, or visit the NEDA website for information about how to get involved. Several organizations are using National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013 as a platform to promote accurate and important information about eating disorders, and move these illnesses to the forefront of the public consciousness. Below is a list of events in which Eating Recovery Center, The Moore Center and Summit Eating Disorders Outreach Program are participating: • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorder Network of Central Florida; Sunday, February 24, Orlando, Fla. • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center; Monday, February 25, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibit; February 25-March 1, Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibition Reception; Thursday, February 28, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Amber Sokoll, MA, NCC, RYT, speaking at Beyond the Mirror’s professional networking event; Tuesday, February 26, Fort Collins, Colo. • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Celebrate Your Body Week event, hosted by the University of California Davis; Wednesday, February 27, Davis, Calif. • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Love Your Body event, hosted by California State University Sacramento; Thursday, February 28, Sacramento, Calif. • Celebrity Dance Challenge, hosted by the Eating Disorders Information Network; Thursday, February 28, Atlanta, Ga. • Jen Sommer, RD, speaking at Eating Disorders Coalition of Iowa event; Saturday, March 2, Des Moines, Iowa. • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by the University of Nevada Reno; Saturday, March 2, Reno, Nev. • Binge Eating Disorder Workshop, hosted by The Moore Center; Saturday, March 2, Bellevue, Wash. “Like” or tweet this article to share and show your support for National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. Additionally, use the “hashtag” #NEDAwareness to see what everyone else is saying about this important annual event. ----- *http://nedawareness.org/impact
  20. 20. page 20 Corazón Tierra, 43, began developing an eating disorder when she was only eight years old. As an immigrant from Puerto Rico, she felt like her physical appearance didn’t fit into American culture. “When I came here, it became more complicated. We’re not beautiful according to the standard,” she says. Tierra also felt pressure from her mother to be thin. “The only territory I had to control was my body.” Her eating disorder continued unnoticed when she was a teenager. When she was about 18, she weighed only 85 pounds. She hadn’t gained weight since she was 12 years old. Tierra feels that there is a contradiction in her culture when it comes to food and body image. “There is a very mixed message,” she says. “There is so much attention on food, but then everyone is concerned about weight. Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., chief medical officer and medical director of child and adolescent services at Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colorado, says the notion that Latinas are less susceptible to eating disorders may have been statistically true at one time but is now an absolute myth. “Ethnicity was able to offer protection from the development of an eating disorder. At one point it was true, but is a myth today. That protectiveness has eroded,” Bermudez says. “Latina women and Latino men today are as much at risk as the Caucasian population.” Dr. Marisol Perez, a clinical psychologist specializing in eating disorders and associate professor at Texas A&M University, says the reason for this misconception was because Latinas were not included in the research at the time. “Historically, it was thought to be a white upper class phenomenon,” she says. “And most research was conducted among this population.” But recent studies have found that Latinas have eating disorders and body image concerns at rates comparable to or greater than non-Latina whites. February 9, 2013 Latina struggles when eating disorders and culture collide | Erika L. Sanchez
  21. 21. page 21 “If you look at the research literature, the perception is not well- founded,” says Deb Franko, professor of counseling & applied educational psychology and associate dean at Northeastern University. In the study, “Considering J.Lo and Ugly Betty: a qualitative examination of risk factors and prevention targets for body dissatisfaction, eating disorders, and obesity in young Latina women,” Franko and her colleagues found that the college-aged Latinas in their focus groups struggled with conflicting cultural expectations. “The messages from their families that larger bodies are beautiful are bumping against a more Caucasian white culture that promotes a thin body ideal,” Franko says. Some experts believe that acculturation also plays an important role. “The prevalence goes up for each generation that is here in the U.S.,” Perez says. Bermudez believes this shift is also a result of globalization and the easy access to mainstream culture. “We know that Latina women are more and more vulnerable,” he says. Sometimes, however, Hispanic women with eating disorders may not necessarily be concerned about weight. “Body dissatisfaction is different for Latinas,” Perez says. Because of this, they may be missed in health screenings. Additionally, the stigma of seeking psychological help and the high cost of treatment may be barriers in seeking care. “We are barely scratching the surface of prevention,” Bermudez says. “I do think that debunking the myth is necessary. We should be making people aware of the reality and informing families of what they can do.” Parents can help prevent the development of eating disorders by learning to detect changes in behavior. Some early indicators, Perez says, are rigid rules about food, displeasure with their body, baggier clothes, and going to the bathroom after eating. “Parents can teach their children to accept their bodies. They should really strive to include compliments about their other qualities like personality and leadership skills,” she says. Edie Hernandez Putt, PsyD, LPC, believes that mothers also play a pivotal role in their daughters’ relationship with food. “Girls are ripe to words, language, and behaviors of their mothers. We should be watching how we talk about food,” she says. If parents are worried their children may be suffering from an eating disorder, Perez suggests looking for resources at Academy for Eating Disorders and the National Eating Disorders Association. Organizations like these are also becoming increasingly interested in Latinas and other women of color. As an eating disorder survivor, Tierra now uses her experiences to raise awareness about eating disorders among Latinas. “There are so many body image issues that we need to address,” she says. “We need to start seeing ourselves from the inside.”
  22. 22. page 22 February 20, 2013 Eating Recovery Center Offers Guidance to Help Individuals Avoid Eating Disorders Relapse | Digital Outreach International treatment center encourages four strategies for living a life of recovery Tens of millions of Americans struggle with eating disorders, including a growing population of baby boomers, adolescents and children. For individuals in recovery from these complex illnesses, a frightening reality is the possibility of eating disorders relapse. In fact, a 2005 study in the European Eating Disorders Review found that more than one-third of individuals who have struggled with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa will experience an eating disorders relapse in the first two and a half years after leaving a treatment center. With National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013 taking place next week, February 24-March 2, Eating Recovery Center, an international center providing comprehensive treatment for eating disorders, seeks to highlight the skills and support structures that help men, women and children live a life of recovery. Recognizing that the hardest work of recovery often begins upon returning to “real life” following intensive eating disorders treatment, Eating Recovery Center offers these four strategies to help individuals protect their health and avoid eating disorders relapse. Remain actively engaged with the aftercare plan. Discharge planning and the development of a recovery- focused post-treatment strategy are critical in creating sustainable recoveries and preventing relapse. These individualized aftercare plans are created by licensed therapists who work closely with a patient’s treatment team to identify emotional, behavioral and situational discharge challenges, and outline personal and recovery- focused goals. Develop a strong supportive network. Friends, family and colleagues who have been educated about eating disorders and understand how to support a loved one in his or her recovery can be very helpful in sustaining recovery. Many individuals find a strong recovery-focused community through the alumni programming offered by many treatment centers. These programs generally provide ongoing education, events and a sense of community to support a life of eating disorders recovery. Identify values and pursue valued life directions. Values not only serve as a compass for people’s lives, but also help individuals with eating disorders understand why change is necessary and pursue that change, even when it feels overwhelmingly difficult. Not surprisingly, identifying values and valued life directions are key components of the eating disorders recovery process. Taking time to be in touch with values and align thoughts and actions with valued life directions can help sustain recovery, even in times of stress or challenges. Seek help. Sustainable recoveries do not just happen. Individuals and families in recovery from eating disorders must work diligently to protect and maintain a healthy weight and body image.
  23. 23. page 23 The need for additional support – through support groups, outpatient therapy or an intensive treatment program – does not indicate failure, but rather underscores an ongoing commitment to doing whatever it takes to sustain eating disorders recovery. “By nature, individuals with eating disorders tend to be perfectionistic and high achieving—they like to do things right, and they like to be the best at their endeavors,” explains Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS, chief marketing officer at Eating Recovery Center. “Their approach to recovery is generally no different, and patients often struggle to understand that life without an eating disorder looks different for every individual and there is no ‘right’ or ‘perfect’ way to live a life of recovery. In addition to developing recovery skills and implementing effective support systems, patients must also accept that challenges are likely to arise and understand that they have not failed even if recovery lapses occur.” For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013, visit www. nationaleatingdisorders.org/nedawareness-week. Join Eating Recovery Center and its partner programs, The Moore Center and Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program, at the following events during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013: • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorder Network of Central Florida; • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center; Monday, February 25, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. (Eating Recovery Center exhibiting) • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibit; February 25-March 1, Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibition Reception; Thursday, February 28, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Amber Sokoll, MA, NCC, RYT, speaking at Beyond the Mirror’s professional networking event; Tuesday, February 26, Fort Collins, Colo. • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Celebrate Your Body Week event, hosted by the University of California Davis; Wednesday, February 27, Davis, Calif. (Summit speaking, exhibiting) • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Love Your Body event, hosted by California State University Sacramento; Thursday, February 28, Sacramento, Calif. (Summit speaking, exhibiting) • Celebrity Dance Challenge, hosted by the Eating Disorders Information Network; Thursday, February 28, Atlanta, Ga. (Eating Recovery Center sponsoring, attending) • Jen Sommer, RD, speaking at Eating Disorders Coalition of Iowa event; Saturday, March 2, Des Moines, Iowa. (Eating Recovery Center speaking, exhibiting) • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by the University of Nevada Reno; Saturday, March 2, Reno, Nev. (Summit sponsoring, exhibiting) • Binge Eating Disorder Workshop, hosted by The Moore Center; Saturday, March 2, Bellevue, Wash.
  24. 24. page 24 Tens of millions of Americans struggle with eating disorders, including a growing population of baby boomers, adolescents and children. For individuals in recovery from these complex illnesses, a frightening reality is the possibility of eating disorders relapse. In fact, a 2005 study in the European Eating Disorders Review found that more than one-third of individuals who have struggled with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa will experience an eating disorders relapse in the first two and a half years after leaving a treatment center. With National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013 taking place next week, February 24-March 2, Eating Recovery Center, an international center providing comprehensive treatment for eating disorders, seeks to highlight the skills and support structures that help men, women and children live a life of recovery. Recognizing that the hardest work of recovery often begins upon returning to “real life” following intensive eating disorders treatment, Eating Recovery Center offers these four strategies to help individuals protect their health and avoid eating disorders relapse. 1. Remain actively engaged with the aftercare plan. Discharge planning and the development of a recovery- focused post-treatment strategy are critical in creating sustainable recoveries and preventing relapse. These individualized aftercare plans are created by licensed therapists who work closely with a patient’s treatment team to identify emotional, behavioral and situational discharge challenges, and outline personal and recovery-focused goals. 2. Develop a strong supportive network. Friends, family and colleagues who have been educated about eating disorders and understand how to support a loved one in his or her recovery can be very helpful in sustaining recovery. Many individuals find a strong recovery-focused community through the alumni programming offered by many treatment centers. These programs generally provide ongoing education, events and a sense of community to support a life of eating disorders recovery. 3. Identify values and pursue valued life directions. Values not only serve as a compass for people’s lives, but also help individuals with eating disorders understand why change is necessary and pursue that change, even when it feels overwhelmingly difficult. Not surprisingly, identifying values and valued life directions are key components of the eating disorders recovery process. Taking time to be in touch with values and align thoughts and actions with valued life directions can help sustain recovery, even in times of stress or challenges. February 20, 2013 Avoid Eating Disorders Relapse | Barbara Mader
  25. 25. page 25 4. Seek help. Sustainable recoveries do not just happen. Individuals and families in recovery from eating disorders must work diligently to protect and maintain a healthy weight and body image. The need for additional support – through support groups, outpatient therapy or an intensive treatment program – does not indicate failure, but rather underscores an ongoing commitment to doing whatever it takes to sustain eating disorders recovery. “By nature, individuals with eating disorders tend to be perfectionistic and high achieving—they like to do things right, and they like to be the best at their endeavors,” explains Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS, chief marketing officer at Eating Recovery Center. “Their approach to recovery is generally no different, and patients often struggle to understand that life without an eating disorder looks different for every individual and there is no ‘right’ or ‘perfect’ way to live a life of recovery. In addition to developing recovery skills and implementing effective support systems, patients must also accept that challenges are likely to arise and understand that they have not failed even if recovery lapses occur.” For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013, visit www. nationaleatingdisorders.org/nedawareness-week. To find out more about Eating Recovery Center and its partner programs, The Moore Center and Summit Eating Disorders and Outreach Program, visit the following events during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2013: • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by The Eating Disorder Network of Central Florida; Sunday, February 24, Orlando, Fla. (Eating Recovery Center sponsoring) • Mind and Body Fair, hosted by the University of Northern Colorado’s Women’s Resource Center; Monday, February 25, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Greeley, Colo. (Eating Recovery Center exhibiting) • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibit; February 25-March 1, Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Eating Recovery Center Patient Artwork Exhibition Reception; Thursday, February 28, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Eating Recovery Center lobby, 1830 Franklin Street, Denver, Colo. • Amber Sokoll, MA, NCC, RYT, speaking at Beyond the Mirror’s professional networking event; Tuesday, February 26, Fort Collins, Colo. • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Celebrate Your Body Week event, hosted by the University of California Davis; Wednesday, February 27, Davis, Calif. (Summit speaking, exhibiting) • Jennifer Lombardi, MFT, speaking at the Love Your Body event, hosted by California State University Sacramento; Thursday, February 28, Sacramento, Calif. (Summit speaking, exhibiting) • Celebrity Dance Challenge, hosted by the Eating Disorders Information Network; Thursday, February 28, Atlanta, Ga. (Eating Recovery Center sponsoring, attending) • Jen Sommer, RD, speaking at Eating Disorders Coalition of Iowa event; Saturday, March 2, Des Moines, Iowa. (Eating Recovery Center speaking, exhibiting) • National Eating Disorders Association Walk, hosted by the University of Nevada Reno; Saturday, March 2, Reno, Nev. (Summit sponsoring, exhibiting) • Binge Eating Disorder Workshop, hosted by The Moore Center; Saturday, March 2, Bellevue, Wash. Follow all the news about Pets, Education and Child Health by subscribing to my articles. Click on the “Subscribe” button, or here: http://www.examiner.com/user-bmader.
  26. 26. page 26 February 22, 2013 Eating disorders amp up with technology | Julie Dubin Is your teen into the etriggers trend? The bounty of diet and exercise information at our fingertips gives endless options for living a healthy lifestyle, but for kids and teens struggling with eating issues, technology can trigger rigid behavior that fuels extreme dieting and exercise. February 24 - March 2 is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. The theme this year is “everybody knows somebody.” As a parent, it’s so important to know what’s happening in our kids’ lives, particularly when it comes to their health and wellness. Have you considered the ways that technology could contribute to unhealthy eating habits and eating disorders? Tech triggers Though not a clinical term, eTriggers is a shortened way of referring to electronic- or technology-based activities that could potentially trigger someone to engage in dieting, exercise or disordered eating behaviors, says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., the medical director of child and adolescent services at Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colorado. Kids and teens may use game consoles, computers, tablets and phones to study diet and exercise techniques. For example, calorie-counting smart phone or tablet apps that manage calorie intake or exercise-focused video games that measure current weight and calories burned. Healthy when used in moderation, but when taken too far, they can enable damaging behaviors. In addition, there’s a myriad of websites, such as pro-anorexia or pro-bulimia websites or forums, that offer harmful tips to help children and adolescents learn and practice disordered eating behaviors, Dr. Bermudez adds. It’s important to recognize that these activities do not “cause” eating disorders. Eating disorders are complex, heritable diseases that involve bio-psycho-social factors, says Dr. Bermudez. “These triggers can simply kick-start one behavior that may be taken to an extreme, and they can serve as enablers for unhealthy food- or exercise-focused behaviors that have already begun.”
  27. 27. page 27 They want to be the best Through websites, phone apps, games and social media forums, technology can trigger or enable an eating disorder. “An important part of the mindset of individuals struggling with eating disorders is a desire to learn ‘how to do it better’ and how to compete with others,” says Dr. Bermudez. “Both of these can be cemented by accessing information related to losing weight.” Plus, they compare themselves to other people with eating disorders and motivate themselves to “do it better” by learning new ways to drop weight and bond with others around their successes or failures in eating disorders behaviors. What you need to know • It’s not just kids genetically predisposed to eating disorders who have to worry about the dangers of e-Triggers. Any kid can get lured in. • Be aware of the technology your kids have access to and the amount of time they spend using it on school days and weekends. • Keep an open dialogue with your children about healthy habits and technology. • Parents are ultimately responsible for monitoring the appropriateness of their kids’ screen use. February 22, 2013 Web Extra: Complete Interview with Dr. Ken Weiner | Kaitlin McCulley Dr. Weiner did a recorded interview on eating disorders and specfically among Birmingham teenagers while traveling for a conference. The piece aired the same day in the 5 p.m. newscast. Full video available on the CD at the back of this clipbook.
  28. 28. page 28 February 25, 2013 National Eating Disorder Awareness Week: Everybody Knows Somebody | Alanna Nunez While it can be hard to love yourself just as you are, the people behind National Eating Disorder Awareness Week are hoping to change that. This year’s week-long campaign started Sunday with the theme “everybody knows somebody” to emphasize that eating disorders know no boundaries. “We’re hoping to bring education and awareness on a grand scale to the public so they can better understand this illness and hopefully help us steer people torward the help they need,” says Lynn Grefe, president and CEO of National Eating Disorders Association. “Last year we tried to focus on the fact that it could happen to any individual—a mother, a sister, a daughter, a brother. This year we’re hoping to focus on the cultural and ethnic diversity.” While eating disorders are often thought of as something that affect only women, the reality is anyone can fall victim to one. In fact, male eating disorders account for almost 10 percent of all cases. Perhaps even more depressing is that a 2012 study found that eating disorders in children are increasing. The signs of an eating disorder can vary from person to person, Bonnie Brennan, clinical director of Eating Recovery Center’s Adult Partial Hospitalization Program told SHAPE in a previous post. Common symptoms include an intense fear of being fat, weight loss, avoiding situations in which expected to eat food, using the bathroom directly after a meal, excessive exercise, having conversations that are highly centered on food or calories or weight, “having to” prepare separate meals, and fear of not knowing what ingredients are included in foods (such as at a restaurant). But it’s also important to remember that eating disorders are really less about food and more about underlying issues such as a feeling of a loss of control over life or low self-esteem. “They’re much more about how a person’s feeling about themselves, and they show dissatisfaction and anxiety through their behavior with food,” Grefe says. “We should remember that we come in all different shapes and sizes and that one is not better than the other.” Think of eating disorders as you would any other serious illness, Grefe stresses. “It’s important to remember that they’re nobody’s fault. People don’t develop them on purpose.”
  29. 29. page 29 If you suspect a loved on may have an eating disorder, Brennan recommends finding a neutral setting and time to meet, and then expressing your concerns gently. “When speaking with your friend, use non-judgmental language and ‘I’ statements,” she says. “It is okay to point out behaviors and emotions you have noticed, but avoid blaming or shaming. Be prepared to listen and don’t try to problem solve. Offer to help your friend find a professional to talk to.” Grefe adds, “It’s important to remember that love and support are vital.” February 27, 2013 7 Tips To Help Kids Cope With Stress | Margarita Tartakovsky Stress can spark disordered eating. While the relationship between the two is complex and varies by person, many people turn to food — or away from food — in times of stress. Controlling food intake becomes a way to cope. In other words, “many people react to stress by under- or over-eating,” according to Jamie Manwaring, PhD, a primary therapist at Eating Recovery Center’s Child and Adolescent Behavioral Hospital. When stress strikes, kids may also seek comfort in bingeing or restricting how much they eat. Parents and caregivers can help their kids learn to cope with stress healthfully and create a safe and open environment. Here are expert tips on how to help. 1. Help your child create more downtime. Kids who are driven and perfectionistic can unwittingly increase their stress. “For children and adolescents, overscheduling and the desire to achieve in multiple clubs, AP classes [and] sports can cumulatively lead to stress that is dealt with in unhealthy ways, such as disordered eating or exercise,” according to Manwaring. That’s why she suggested helping “your child decrease the amount of clubs, activities, and competitive sports in their lives to allow for more play and downtime.” It’s important for parents to be proactive, especially “when you have a perfectionistic child who may have difficulty making these decisions themselves.” Plus, downtimes teaches kids “how to regulate themselves and realize that they do not have to be constantly on the go,” said Mehri D. Moore, MD, founder and medical director at The Moore Center.
  30. 30. page 30 2. Be a role model for stress relief and reasonable schedules. “Parents also need to model, as much as possible, balance in their own lives between work, family and fulfilling their own needs so their children can learn from example,” Dr. Moore said. 3. When your child comes to you, give them your full attention. In other words, avoid distractions like electronic devices. Don’t scan your cell phone, for instance, Manwaring said. 4. Don’t rush to fix or problem-solve. When your child vents to you, practice active listening skills by mirroring back what they say, Marwaring said. Unless your child asks for help, don’t try to fix or problem-solve too quickly, she said. “Often the best stress relief is knowing that someone listens and cares.” 5. Teach your child how to soothe themselves. Practice self-soothing techniques when your child is calm. Manwaring suggested: “deep breathing (‘picture filling your belly like a balloon’), listening to soothing music, visualization (e.g. picturing distressing emotions in clouds or bubbles that float away) and repeating soothing words internally (e.g., ‘I am OK,’ or ‘I am relaxed.’).” 6. Carve out family time. “Creating time for family is important so parents can talk to their children about their daily lives and help them to deal with stressful situations as they arise,” Dr. Moore said. 7. Don’t forget the power of a hug — or even a high-five. “All of us can be soothed by human touch. Even older kids benefit from hugs and high-fives,” Manwaring said. Kids are just as susceptible to stress as adults. And they’re just as prone to engaging in unhealthy behaviors to cope with it. But parents and caregivers can help by teaching and modeling healthy tools and techniques — and by being there to listen. Here’s a piece I wrote last year on signs your child is stressed and strategies to help. And here’s some insight into creating a nurturing, diet-free environment. What are other ways to help kids cope with stress? February 28, 2013 3 Common Myths About Eating Disorders | Margarita Tartakovsky This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week. The goal is to increase awareness and education about eating disorders. Eating disorders are serious illnesses. But, sadly, in our society, they’re both belittled and deeply misunderstood. That’s why, today, I’d like to focus on dispelling several common myths about EDs. Below, two experts from the Eating Recovery Center share the truth behind the misconceptions. Myth: Eating disorders affect young women only. Fact: According to Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS, a clinician and chief marketing officer at Eating Recovery Center, eating disorders have been commonly viewed as a “teenage girl’s disease.”
  31. 31. page 31 But now we know that EDs affect young girls and boys, older women and men. For instance, Holland noted that, “According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), more than one million men currently struggle with eating disorders.” On a related note, socioeconomic status is also irrelevant. (Another view is that EDs only affect wealthy people, Holland said.) Again, anyone can have an eating disorder — regardless of age, sex, size, race and religion. Plus, “as general awareness and education around eating disorders continues to improve, individuals who may not have known what they were dealing with are now considering the idea that it may be an eating disorder.” Myth: Eating disorders aren’t common in families. Fact: ”Genetics and a family history of disordered eating behaviors most certainly play a role in eating disorders development,” Holland said. “A woman with a sister or mother who has had anorexia is 12 times more likely to develop the disease and four times more like to develop bulimia.” The same goes for boys and men. “[They] also can have an increased risk for eating disorders development if a family member has struggled with them,” she said. “It is critical that individuals know and understand their family history, so they are aware of the family members who have struggled with an eating disorder or body image issue.” This way, you can spot warning signs early and step in to help. Myth: The media causes eating disorders. Fact: “Although images portrayed by the media can be a trigger for disordered eating behaviors, [eating disorders] are biologically and genetically based mental illnesses,” according to Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, clinical director of the adult partial hospitalization program at Eating Recovery Center. Think about it: If the media caused eating disorders, everyone would be susceptible to these serious illnesses. The causes of eating disorders are very complex. According to eating disorder specialist Sarah Ravin, Ph.D, on her blog: “…the development of an eating disorder is influenced very heavily by genetics, neurobiology, individual personality traits, and co-morbid disorders. Environment clearly plays a role in the development of eating disorders, but environment alone is not sufficient to cause them.” “For individuals who find themselves looking through media imagery, or “fitspo” or “thinspo” images, it is often an opportunity to connect with others who are feeling the same way and very possibly using disordered eating behaviors to cope as well,” Brennan said. In short, media isn’t to blame for eating disorders, but it’s still damaging. Whether you have an eating disorder or not, Brennan stressed the importance of being “a critical consumer of media and questioning the images you see.”
  32. 32. page 32 February 28, 2013 Art exhibition helps those with eating disorders | Tammy Vigil It’s an art exhibit in Denver with the usual accoutrements: thought-provoking creations, food and drink and enlightened conversation. But each of these artists shares a painful problem. Each suffers from an eating disorder, including Mary Baldwin. The 21-year-old from Rockford, Illinois has sought treatment form the Eating Recovery Center three times for anorexia and excessive exercise. “I use my eating disorder behavior to run away from what I’m feeling.” This time she believes she has her eating disorder under control–thanks in part to art therapy. “It was kind of like continual journaling. It was a really, really neat experience,” she says. “Different moods bring different marks on the page. It’s an interesting way to connect with myself in different ways.” Baldwin’s piece is called the Doodle Tree. “It represents growth,” she says. It incorporates words guiding her recovery: hope, empowerment and accepting imperfection. “That is what brings out these behaviors, is avoidance of emotional life,” says art therapist Lisa Talucci. Talucci says art helps patients process emotions they typically bury. “There is an inherent healing process that goes on in creating art because it bypasses language. It goes to a more authentic experience that we can’t put words to,” she says. Today Baldwin creates art with words that signify her journey now: courage, truth and thriving. She says she’s not just surviving anymore. “I’m pretty hopeful at the moment, in my last few days here,” she says with a smile.
  33. 33. page 33 It’s artwork that represents pain and hope for a better tomorrow. “I’m just excited to be a young woman in the world again,” says Baldwin. The 22 pieces of art also allow patients to contribute to a bigger cause of eating disorder awareness, and trying to help others like themselves. The art exhibit runs through Saturday. Full video available on the CD at the back of this clipbook. February 28, 2013 Healthy Habits: Eating Disorders and Relapse This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, and it’s a great time to become more aware of eating disorders in general. I recently had the chance to interview Bonnie Brennan, MA, LPC, clinical director of the adult partial hospitalization program at Eating Recovery Center, about eating disorders and relapse. The Eating Recovery Center offers four key tips to help avoid relapse: remain actively engaged with the aftercare plan, develop a strong supportive network, identify values and pursue valued life directions, and seek help. Why is relapse such a major issue for people who have gone into treatment for eating disorders? Eating disorders recovery is hard work. Individuals who have struggled with disordered eating or body image issues have to develop a healthy relationship with their body and with food. This can be difficult as we need food to survive and although it may cause individuals angst, we cannot simply cut ourselves off from food. For adolescents and tweens, they are going through puberty and their bodies are change. It is that much more difficult for them to find body acceptance. For parents of teens and tweens, it is important to emphasize that their body shape and size does not define them as a person. Remind these younger individuals that it is what our bodies do for us, not what they look like that is most important. For individuals who have struggled with an eating disorder, their behaviors were often used as coping mechanisms to deal with changes and stressors in their own lives. Therefore, when in recovery from an eating disorder and something happens that is out of an individual’s control, he or she may tend toward the comfortable, familiar disordered eating behaviors to cope. This is when eating disorders relapse may occur. Besides the tips given for those who have had an eating disorder, how can their family and friends support them in avoiding relapse?
  34. 34. page 34 If you have a friend or loved one who has recently left an eating disorders treatment center, or even has been in recovery for some time, it is always important to watch and look for the warning signs. You can also educate yourself on eating disorders. They are complex mental illnesses that are not “fixed” quickly; it takes time and a commitment to a life of recovery. Do not be afraid to tell the person that you are concerned. You do not have to solve the problem by any means, but rather extend your concern and worry for some of the behaviors they may be exhibiting. Remember to be specific about your concerns so that your friend or loved one is completely aware. What are some of the warning signs of a relapse? Possible eating disorders warning signs extend far beyond an individual restricting his or her food intake or going to the restroom after every meal. Many warning signs can be revealed in how an individual talks or acts about food and his or her own body. Friends or loved ones should watch for an increase in language of eating disorders. Is your friend or loved one talking about his or her body and food more? This could be a potential warning sign. Another possible warning sign is when someone appears to have an increase in the time they spend worrying about food or “undoing food” (i.e. increasing exercise behaviors or taking a longer time to prepare and plan for a meal). Individuals who may be resorting to eating disorders behaviors often get caught up in the details of food, “What am I going to eat for breakfast tomorrow?” or “How am I going to eat lunch with my meeting at that same time?” Eating disorders are very isolating diseases. Individuals who struggle with them isolate themselves as well. They do not want their friends or loved ones to know what they are doing and can feel guilty for their behaviors. Where can people with eating disorders or concerned family and friends go for help? Eating disorders resources exist for individuals in recovery, friends and loved ones. The National Eating Disorders Association, a nonprofit organization that supports individuals and families affected by eating disorders, has an entire resources section to find help and support: nationaleatingdisorders.org/find-help- support. Here in Denver, Eating Recovery Center can do a clinical assessment, free of charge, and recommend an appropriate level of care should an individual be struggling with an eating disorder. Additionally, this treatment center can provide care of men, women, boys and girls of all ages from 10 through adulthood: eatingrecoverycenter.com/eating-disorder-treatment. Another great resources for friends and family is Something Fishy, a website on eating disorders dedicated to raise awareness and providing support. This website offers an entire section on helping loved ones: something- fishy.org/helping/whatyoucando.php. It is always a good idea to check with your local state or hometown eating disorders support groups. Here in Denver, The Eating Disorder Foundation has a family and friends support group and other classes in its support center: eatingdisorderfoundation.org/APlaceofOurOwn.htm.
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  36. 36. page 36 March 1, 2013 Recovery center uses art to help patients with eating disorders The local interview on art therapy in eating disorders treatment during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week was picked up by three TV stations from March 1 to March 4. Full video not available. Tens of millions of Americans struggle with eating disorders, and it’s not just teenagers and women; men suffer from them, too. Now an eating recovery center is using art to help them overcome the illness. It’s an art exhibit with the usual accoutrements: thought-proving creations, food and drink, and enlightened conversation. But each of these artists shares a painful problem. Each suffers from an eating disorder including Mary Baldwin; the 21-year-old has sought treatment three times for anorexia. “I use my eating disorder behavior to run away from what I’m feeling,” says Mary. This time, she believes she has her eating disorder under control thanks in part to art therapy. “It was kind of like continual journaling. Different moods bring different marks on the page. It’s an interesting way to connect with myself in different ways,” says Mary. Baldwin’s piece called the Doodle Tree. It incorporates words guiding her recovery: hope, empowerment and accepting imperfection. “That is what brings out these behaviors, is avoidance of emotional life.” Art therapist Lisa Talucci says art helps patients process emotions they typically bury. “There is an inherent healing process that goes on in creating art because it bypasses language. It goes to a more authentic experience that we not put words to,” says Talucci. Today, Baldwin creates art with words that signify her journey now: courage, truth and thriving.
  37. 37. page 37 She says she’s not just surviving anymore. “I’m pretty hopeful at the moment, in my last few days here,” says Mary. It’s artwork that represents pain and hope for a better tomorrow. “I’m just excited to be a young woman in the world again,” says Mary. With spring breaks fast approaching, followed swiftly by summertime and swimsuit season, many Americans are turning an eye toward losing weight, and they want to drop the pounds quickly. Often used as an alternative to adopting healthy eating habits and engaging in regular exercise, weight loss supplements, including diet pills, are widely consumed by men, women and teens looking to achieve quick weight loss. These supplements are available for purchase seemingly everywhere – at grocery stores, at drugstores, over the Internet, even at some gas stations – and the hundreds of products available are heavily advertised, with each touting swift, significant weight loss. Sometimes, our favorite celebrities endorse these products, encouraging the average Joe and Jane to simply take the pills, drink the shakes or eat the meals to achieve their same coveted physique. Despite the small, inconspicuous text at the bottom of virtually every ad explaining that the weight loss results depicted are not typical, or the many Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warnings that have been issued to consumers about the health dangers of weight loss supplements, people are still buying these products. In fact, they are buying a lot of them; it is estimated that Americans spend $20 billion each year on diet books, diet drugs and weight-loss surgeries.* While most users of weight loss supplements find themselves disappointed in the results, there are far more serious consequences of using these products. Side effects are abundant, ranging from temporary headaches and nausea to permanent organ and nervous system damage. In extreme cases, users of weight loss supplements actually die following use of the product. Further contributing to the dangers of using weight loss supplements and diet pills is the connection between using these products and the development of disordered eating behaviors. In fact, a 2008 study found that 42 percent of individuals diagnosed with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa had admitted to using diet pills for weight loss.** The likelihood of developing an eating disorder following the use – or abuse – of weight loss supplements is greatest among individuals with a family history of eating disorders. Recent research suggests that the risk of developing an eating disorder is 50-80 percent determined by genetics.*** Men, women and children with a genetic predisposition who use weight loss supplements may be far more susceptible to developing eating disorders than those without a family history of disordered eating. March 15, 2013 Do weight loss supplements trigger eating disorders? | Julie Holland
  38. 38. page 38 If you suspect that a friend or loved one may be abusing weight loss supplements, or that his or her use of diet pills may be contributing to the development of an eating disorder, the following warning signs may be present: — weight loss or drastic fluctuations in weight; — preoccupation with weight, food, food labels and dieting; — excessive consumption of fluids or denial of hunger; — avoidance of meal times and situations involving food; — withdrawal from friends and activities; — self-induced vomiting; — excessive, rigid exercise regimen; — and change in dress, such as wearing oversized pieces to cover the body or revealing clothes to flaunt weight loss. The use of weight loss supplements among individuals with a genetic predisposition toward developing an eating disorder can be a deadly combination, not just because of the health risks associated with diet pills but also due to the alarming mortality rate of eating disorders. Recent research has found that individuals with anorexia had a six fold increase in mortality compared to the general population, with common reasons for death including starvation, substance abuse and suicide.**** Recognizing the warning signs that diet pill use might be developing into an eating disorder, combined with early intervention and effective treatment from an eating disorders specialist, can be critical to lasting recovery. Comment below with your questions about weight loss supplements, eating disorders or related issues. ----- *http://abcnews.go.com/Health/100-million-dieters-20-billion-weight-loss-... **http://www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org/documents/TalkingpointsEatingDis... ***http://eatingdisorders.ucsd.edu/research/pdf_papers/2008/reba-harrelson2... ****http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/mortality-and-eating-disorders The concept of nutrition and healthy eating is increasingly pervasive in the United States, particularly as our country is faced with both an emerging obesity “epidemic” as well as a startling rise in the number of men, women and children struggling with eating disorders. Each March, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics seeks to focus attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits during National Nutrition Month. In addition to underscoring the important role that nutrition plays in our everyday lives, National Nutrition Month is an ideal opportunity to gain insight and perspective on the importance of nutrition in eating disorders treatment and recovery. Nutrition plays a fundamental role in the treatment of an eating disorder. Patients’ thoughts and behaviors around food are generally negative and destructive, and many individuals need to restore weight in order to regain the clarity of mind March 21, 2013 National Nutrition Month brings focus to nutrition and eating disorders | Julie Holland
  39. 39. page 39 necessary to fully engage in therapy. Even for those patients who are at a normal weight at the time they seek eating disorders treatment, nutrition counseling and education are critical in addressing issues related to their underlying relationship with food. In general, nutrition counseling seeks to help patients overcome their fear of food and eating by providing support and structure during meals, education on a balanced pattern of nutrition and collaborative care to achieve a healthy weight for optimal recovery. For individuals struggling with eating disorders, there are no “good” or “bad” foods—all foods are fine in moderation as part of a diet characterized by balance and variety. These notions are reinforced by Marla Scanzello, MS, RD, director of dietary services for Eating Recovery Center. “The primary goal of nutrition counseling for individuals with eating disorders is to help them normalize eating and optimize health. Dietitians also challenge the distorted thoughts their patients often have and correct misinformation about food and diets that is often perpetuated by the media.” There are various levels of care in eating disorders treatment, ranging from inpatient hospitalization for severely underweight or medically compromised patients to occasional outpatient appointments with a dietitian, which is usually appropriate for individuals in recovery or those with more minor food and body image issues. At each level of care, nutrition counseling plays a different role. At the inpatient level of care, dietitians may work closely with internal medicine physicians, psychiatrists and therapists to help the patient restore sufficient weight so that they may engage meaningfully in therapy. Whereas, a dietary professional working with an individual on an outpatient basis may lead group education classes or participate in a supervised meal, providing support and information to the patient as they plate and portion his or her food. “For example, a patient in Eating Recovery Center’s Partial Hospitalization Program will have the opportunity to participate in various activities that are integral in fostering lasting recovery from a nutritional perspective,” explained Scanzello. “From dining out in restaurants during staff-supported outings to learning about healthy cooking and food preparation techniques in cooking classes at the Center, these activities nurture the knowledge and skills necessary to help patients sustain a life of recovery.” When it comes to food and nutrition, patients oftentimes experience new, unexpected challenges when they leave treatment that they were not anticipating. Nutrition counseling is an additional form of support in eating disorders recovery, and eating disorders professionals like Scanzello encourage individuals to take advantage of the numerous supportive resources available. For example, major holidays and family meals can be stressful food events for individuals in recovery from an eating disorder. During these times of stress, working with dietitians can help individuals strategize on how to manage these occasions while still following their meal plans to ensure they are consuming necessary nutrition. Scanzello also acknowledges that many individuals find nutrition counseling beneficial even when they are not struggling with or recovering from a diagnosed eating disorder. “When individuals begin eliminating entire food groups from their diets or become preoccupied with food, weight or exercise, it can be a sign that they should speak to a dietitian,” continued Scanzello. “Dietitians can also help address exercise behaviors, working with patients to ensure a healthy balance between the amount and types of food an individual consumes and the frequency or intensity at which he or she exercises.”

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