Eating Recovery Center    Media Presence        2010
Table of ContentsJanuary.....................................................................................................
January 1, 2010Recent Research Reveals Trends in the Process of Referrals for Patients with EatingDisorders               ...
page
page
Out of Control: Eating Disorders Among Athletes | Linda HeplerJanuary 1, 2010                                             ...
page
**Digital Outreach**January 4, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution AlternativesMore than ha...
January 4, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution Alternatives: Online PR News – ...
The center is a licensed hospital, but she is warm and inviting. There are many beautiful works of art andmodern furnishin...
7. Development of food rituals, such as eating foods in a certain order or rearranging food on a plate   8. Withdrawal fro...
“If your loved one’s diet takes a turn for the worse, discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring,supportive way...
page 1
Center Encourages Dieters to Think of Lifestyle Change | Crystal Thomas                                                   ...
January 26, 2010Health Briefs                   page 1
page 1
February 1, 2010Product/Service Center: Women’s Treatment Centers                                                    page 1
page 1
February 1, 2010Family FYI: Meet Dr. Kenneth Weiner                                      page 1
**Digital Outreach**February 11, 2010“America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?”“America the Beautiful: Is A...
It’s Time to Talk About It | Kristen Browning-BlasFebruary 15, 2010                                                     pa...
**Digital Outreach**                                                                                 dBusiness News ran in...
**Digital Outreach**February 16, 2010Candlelight Vigil to Increase Awareness of Eating DisordersMental health champions an...
February 17, 2010Eating Disorder Advocates Gather in Denver for Awareness WeekMental health champions and local community ...
**Digital Outreach**February 17, 2010Eating Recovery Center Reveals Eye-Opening Eating Disorder Facts for NationalEating D...
National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2010 | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 18, 2010Next week is National Eating Disorder Awa...
Kirsten Haglund, Miss America 2008 will Speak during “Love Your Body Day” at the annual UA event onMonday, Feb 22Michael L...
When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm – 10 pmWhere: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union – B ...
»THIRD- TO FIFTH-READERS CLUB: CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS, 6-8 p.m., Centennial ParkLibrary, 2227 23rd Ave., Greele...
NEDA Week: It’s Tims to Talk About Eating Disorder Myths  Facts | MargaritaFebruary 22, 2010TartakovskyIt’s Time to Talk A...
‘control issues’ are manifestations of the underlying temperament that predisposes people to EDs. Correlationrather than c...
Myth: Developing a positive body image is not that important in the overall recovery from an eatingdisorder and should be ...
From Kate Le Page,      The media often portrays anorexia as being glamorous or something that is almost fashionable      ...
MentorConnect program. I think AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) is great because you have a       sponsor, and I love how MentorC...
Weighing the facts | Wendy ZookFebruary 23, 2010One-size-fits-all not true when it comes to reasons behind eating disorder...
athletic trainer Sue Barkman said. “When you get down to the actual root of an eating disorder, that can bepart of the pro...
Since beginning her recovery, Heckman has lobbied for easier treatment access for all psychiatric diseases,including eatin...
The list below has a few examples of events taking place across the country. There are many more available.Speakers:Eating...
Seattle NEDA Walk (Cal Anderson Park, Capital Hill, Seattle)Saturday, April 17th. Registration at 10 am, Walk at 11 am.Hos...
February 25, 2010Interview with Dr. WeinerPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video.11 News Special ...
A Place People Would Want to Be | Lindsay BarbaMarch 1, 2010                                                  page 1
page 2
page
page
The Role of Temperament in Eating Disorders | Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDSMarch 1, 2010Temperament refers to those aspects o...
unenthusiastic, stoical, reflective, frugal, reserved, tolerant of monotony, systematic and orderly. In eatingdisordered p...
March 17, 2010Status UpdateEating disorders in college, a helpful brochure (it’s a pdf file) from @EatingRecovery: http://...
March 26, 2010Eating Recovery Center Now Featured in the Eating Disorder Hope Specialist LibraryEating Disorder Hope proud...
FacilityIntegrating state-of-the-art design with a warm and nurturing environment, our facility enhances thetherapeutic ex...
Eating Disorders in College | Julie HollandApril 7, 2010 Transitioning to college means a new freedom-filled life with new...
Providing Support During and After TreatmentLearning how to respond and interact with someone who has an eating disorder c...
Tips To Help a Family Member or Friend with an Eating Disorder• Have patience and ask your family member or friend what yo...
April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eating Disorder Patients ...
**Digital Outreach**April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eatin...
April 16, 2010Event Listing: BFI WorkshopBFI Workshop Mention | Margarita TartakovskyApril 20, 2010--On a side note, if yo...
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook

2,937 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,937
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Eating Recovery Center 2010 Clipbook

  1. 1. Eating Recovery Center Media Presence 2010
  2. 2. Table of ContentsJanuary.........................................................................................................page 3 to 15**Digital Outreach: pages 8, 10 & 11, 13 & 14February.....................................................................................................page 16 to 40**Digital Outreach: pages 20, 22 & 23, 25March..........................................................................................................page 41 to 49**Digital Outreach: page 47April............................................................................................................page 50 to 59**Digital Outreach: pages 54, 57 & 58May..............................................................................................................page 60 to 74**Digital Outreach: pages 70, 73 & 74June............................................................................................................page 75 to 87**Digital Outreach: pages 85 & 86July..............................................................................................................page 88 to 96**Digital Outreach: pages 88 & 89, 94August.......................................................................................................page 97 to 105**Digital Outreach: n/aSeptember...............................................................................................page 106 to 118**Digital Outreach: pages 109 & 110October....................................................................................................page 119 to 136**Digital Outreach: pages 135 & 136November...............................................................................................page 137 to 150**Digital Outreach: page 150December................................................................................................page 151 to 161**Digital Outreach: n/a
  3. 3. January 1, 2010Recent Research Reveals Trends in the Process of Referrals for Patients with EatingDisorders page
  4. 4. page
  5. 5. page
  6. 6. Out of Control: Eating Disorders Among Athletes | Linda HeplerJanuary 1, 2010 page
  7. 7. page
  8. 8. **Digital Outreach**January 4, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution AlternativesMore than half of dieters end up heavier than before, yet dieting remains one of America’s most popular NewYear’s resolutions. Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commissionaccredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eatingdisorders, encourages Americans to instead make resolutions focused on healthy lifestyle changes.“While 95 percent of diets fail, lifestyle changes have a significantly higher success rate,” explains Dr. KennethL. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “Instead of resolving to dietin 2010, focus on living a balanced lifestyle complete with moderate exercise and well-balanced meals.”In 2010, Eating Recovery Center encourages considering one or more of these lifestyle changes as a healthy,empowering alternative to dieting: • Set goals that are “body movement” based. Join a yoga class for relaxation, a dance class for fun or an aerobics class because it makes you feel good. • Remove “good food, bad food” talk from your vocabulary. Remember it’s all about moderation. • Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. • Stop comparing yourself to others. Being unique is what makes our world a wonderful place! • Resolve to help others feel better about themselves as well. Offer a friend or family member a heartfelt non body focused compliment every day.“Diets don’t work. They can also be dangerous,” explains Weiner. “For an individual genetically predisposed toan eating disorder, a New Year’s resolution diet can spiral into disordered eating.”For more information about body image and eating disorders, please visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page
  9. 9. January 4, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution Alternatives: Online PR News – 04-January-20.. http://bit.ly/5ncGLDJanuary 4, 2010Status UpdateEating Recovery Center Offers Empowering New Year’s Resolution Alternatives http://bit.ly/54q4TSJanuary 12, 2010Does anyone have experience with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver?Get Info - Get info on Eating Recovery Center Denver Does Anyone Have Experience With The Eating RecoveryCenter Of Denver? from 14 search engines in 1.Top Sites for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? Click Here! - Learn More about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver?.All about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? . Click Here! - All sites about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver? here.Shopping for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver?? - Shop and compare great deals on eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience withthe eating recovery center of denver? and other related products.Does anyone have experience with the Eating Recovery Center of Denver? - eating recovery center denverI recommend eating Recovery Center. It opened about a year and have just added more hospital beds due tothe increasing need to be able to accommodate more patients in their treatment program. The doctors whofounded the center are Dr. Weiner and Dr. Bishop and both worked in the field of eating disorders in more than25 years. page
  10. 10. The center is a licensed hospital, but she is warm and inviting. There are many beautiful works of art andmodern furnishings, carpeted hallways and rooms and rooms that feel more comfortable in a sterile whitehospital. The staff is very friendly and help to a peaceful environment for recovery.You should visit the center if you are interested, and the ladies of the entrance is really great. You can live chatwith a doctor to access their website or by phone at 877-825-8584.Center Data Recovery - Search for Center Data Recovery on Tazinga! Locate exactly what you are looking foronline or in your area.Get Info - Get info on Eating Recovery Center Denver Does Anyone Have Experience With The Eating RecoveryCenter Of Denver? from 14 search engines in 1.Top Sites for eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? Click Here! - Learn More about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver?.All about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with the eating recovery center ofdenver? . Click Here! - All sites about eating recovery center denver does anyone have experience with theeating recovery center of denver? here. **Digital Outreach**January 21, 2010Be Aware of Eating Disorder Warning Signs During Peak Dieting SeasonIt’s estimated that one-third of Americans made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight this year. Though thesedieting individuals may have healthy intentions, they could be putting themselves at risk for an eating disorder,warns Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accreditedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.“For individuals with a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, a diet can quickly spiral out of controland trigger disordered eating,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “It’s important for families to be aware of eating disorder warning signs and step in whenthey believe their loved one has a problem.”The following 10 signs may indicate that a dieting loved one is developing an eating disorder: 1. Dramatic weight loss 2. Refusal to eat certain foods 3. Evidence of binge-eating or purging behaviors 4. Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss 5. Anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat” 6. Denial of hunger page 10
  11. 11. 7. Development of food rituals, such as eating foods in a certain order or rearranging food on a plate 8. Withdrawal from usual friends and activities 9. Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury 10. Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting or control of food are primary concerns“If your loved one’s diet takes a turn for the worse, discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring,supportive way,” said Weiner. “Encourage your friend or family member to explore these concerns with acounselor, doctor, nutritionist or other qualified professional who is knowledgeable about eating disorders.”For guidance related to eating disorder treatment options, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. For moreinformation about eating disorders and insurance, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/Eating_Disorders_Insurance.pdf. To learn how to support a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Holiday_v3.pdf. To view tips for avoiding eatingdisorders in college, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf. **Appeared only online**January 21, 2010Be Aware of Eating Disorder Warning Signs During Peak Dieting Season Eating Recovery Center Warns That for Some, New Year’s Resolution Diets Can Lead to Eating DisordersIt’s estimated that one-third of Americans made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight this year. Though thesedieting individuals may have healthy intentions, they could be putting themselves at risk for an eating disorder,warns Eating Recovery Center (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accreditedbehavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.“For individuals with a genetic predisposition for an eating disorder, a diet can quickly spiral out of controland trigger disordered eating,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, co-founder and medical director of EatingRecovery Center. “It’s important for families to be aware of eating disorder warning signs and step in whenthey believe their loved one has a problem.”The following 10 signs may indicate that a dieting loved one is developing an eating disorder: 1. Dramatic weight loss 2. Refusal to eat certain foods 3. Evidence of binge-eating or purging behaviors 4. Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss 5. Anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat” 6. Denial of hunger 7. Development of food rituals, such as eating foods in a certain order or rearranging food on a plate 8. Withdrawal from usual friends and activities 9. Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury 10. Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting or control of food are primary concerns page 11
  12. 12. “If your loved one’s diet takes a turn for the worse, discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring,supportive way,” said Weiner. “Encourage your friend or family member to explore these concerns with acounselor, doctor, nutritionist or other qualified professional who is knowledgeable about eating disorders.”For guidance related to eating disorder treatment options, visit www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. For moreinformation about eating disorders and insurance, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/Eating_Disorders_Insurance.pdf. To learn how to support a loved one with an eating disorder during food-focused holidays oroccasions, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Holiday_v3.pdf. To view tips for avoiding eatingdisorders in college, visit www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf.Editor’s Note: More eating disorder story ideas, facts and statistics are available in the Journalist’s Guide forEating Disorders, www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_Journalists_Guide_(FIN).pdf.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 12
  13. 13. page 1
  14. 14. Center Encourages Dieters to Think of Lifestyle Change | Crystal Thomas **Digital Outreach**January 21, 2010 page 1
  15. 15. January 26, 2010Health Briefs page 1
  16. 16. page 1
  17. 17. February 1, 2010Product/Service Center: Women’s Treatment Centers page 1
  18. 18. page 1
  19. 19. February 1, 2010Family FYI: Meet Dr. Kenneth Weiner page 1
  20. 20. **Digital Outreach**February 11, 2010“America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?”“America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessed with Beauty?”Wednesday, Feb 24 6:00pat University of Colorado, Boulder, Mathematics Building, Boulder, CODoes America have an unhealthy obsession with beauty? Join Eating Recovery Center in conjunction withthe University of Colorado Boulder for an intimate screening of “America the Beautiful: Is America Obsessedwith Beauty?” Wednesday, February 24, 2010, at 6 p.m. in Room 100 of the Mathematics Building (southwestcorner of Colorado Ave. read more. **Digital Outreach**February 11, 2010Body Wholeness and Eating Disorder Prevention AwarenessBody Wholeness and Eating Disorders Prevention AwarenessThursday, Feb 18 8:30a to 11:00aat Boulder Valley School District Education Center, Boulder, COEvery experience shapes a child, but which of these experiences can make your child more vulnerable to adistorted body image or eating disorder? Join Dr. Kenneth L. Weiner, CEDS, co-founder of Eating RecoveryCenter, in conjunction with the University of Colorado - Boulder for a community conversation about eatingdisorders, prevention awareness, and resources and tools for maintaining a strong body image. read more page 20
  21. 21. It’s Time to Talk About It | Kristen Browning-BlasFebruary 15, 2010 page 21
  22. 22. **Digital Outreach** dBusiness News ran in Denver and nationallyFebruary 16, 2010Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to HostCandlelight Vigil to Increase Awareness of Eating DisordersMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to educationand advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 22
  23. 23. **Digital Outreach**February 16, 2010Candlelight Vigil to Increase Awareness of Eating DisordersMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to educationand advocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders.About The Eating Disorder FoundationThe Eating Disorder Foundation is a Denver-based non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness about eating disordersthrough targeted education and advocacy initiatives. Founded by revered members of the eating disorders medical community andsurvivors of these life-threatening illnesses, The Eating Disorder Foundation serves as a comprehensive resource for the generalpublic and the health care community in the collective effort to prevent and eliminate eating disorders. For more information aboutThe Eating Disorder Foundation, please visit http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/index.htm.About Eating Recovery CenterEating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 andolder sustainable recovery from eating disorders in a warm, nurturing environment. Our comprehensive program offers patients fromacross the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatientservices in a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital setting. Our compassionate team of professionalscollaborates with treating professionals and loved ones to cultivate lasting behavioral change. For more information, please call 877-218-1344, e-mail info@EatingRecoveryCenter.com or chat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page 2
  24. 24. February 17, 2010Eating Disorder Advocates Gather in Denver for Awareness WeekMental health champions and local community members whose lives have been touched by eating disorderswill gather on Tuesday to raise awareness for eating disorders, America’s deadliest mental illness. Attendeeswill commemorate those who have lost their lives, support those who struggle with these illnesses, andhonor people who have found their way to the light of a lasting recovery. Donations made that evening willcontribute to ongoing Eating Disorder Foundation education initiatives.What: Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m. Vigil to follow at 6:30p.m.Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn).3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222.Who: The Eating Disorder Foundation, a Denver-based non-profit organization committed to education andadvocacy initiatives to prevent and eliminate eating disorders, has organized the candlelight vigil to raiseadditional awareness of this widespread disease that impacts more than 11 million people in the UnitedStates.Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders. page 2
  25. 25. **Digital Outreach**February 17, 2010Eating Recovery Center Reveals Eye-Opening Eating Disorder Facts for NationalEating Disorders Awareness WeekAn astonishing 40 percent of Americans have either experienced or know someone who has experienced aneating disorder, yet misperceptions about these devastating diseases are still plentiful. To build understandingand awareness during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (February 21-27), Eating Recovery Center(www.eatingrecoverycenter.com), a licensed and Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital providingcomprehensive treatment and sustainable recovery for eating disorders, reveals five eye-opening eatingdisorder facts that are not widely known.1. Eating disorders are genetic. An individual with an anorexic mother or sister is 12 times more likely todevelop anorexia nervosa and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. These are not disorders ofchoice.2. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness. A woman with anorexia nervosa is 5.6 times more likelyto die than another woman of her same age. The most frequent causes of death from eating disorders aresuicide (32%), complications associated with anorexia (19%), and cancer (11%). The average age of death foran individual with anorexia is only 34 years.3. The circumstances that cause an eating disorder often have nothing to do with the reasons it continues.An illness, traumatic experience or diet may initiate an eating disorder. However, an individual’s underlyingpersonality traits, values and fears are what can prohibit recovery.4. Eating disorders are not merely triggered by a desire to be thin. For instance, an individual who does notknow that he or she has wheat or lactose intolerance may develop a fear of food due to the discomfort or painit causes. Someone in chemotherapy or with a gastrointestinal disorder may stop eating to avoid nausea.5. People can completely recover from eating disorders. Eating disorders are not addictions and do not haveto lead to lifelong struggles with food. With proper treatment, individuals can completely recover from eatingdisorders.“The fact is that eating disorders are complex, biologically based mental illnesses. They can arise from a varietyof potential causes and affect a wide demographic of Americans,” explains Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS,founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center. “In our society, eating disorders carry stigmasthat too often prevent people from seeking help. Awareness minimizes misconceptions and is vital to help themillions of people with eating disorders feel comfortable finding the treatment they need.” page 2
  26. 26. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2010 | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 18, 2010Next week is National Eating Disorder Awareness Week (February 21st-27th). The theme this year is “It’s Timeto Talk about It.” It is sponsored by the National Eating Disorders Organization. There will be events takingplace all across the country in honor of this week.If you are interested in getting involved, you will find free screenings, fashion shows, scale smashings,documentaries, and lectures. Many events are taking place or sponsored by universities and health fairs. Ifyou’d like to find out what is happening in your area, contact www.nationaleatingdisorders.orgWhy is this week important? Eating disorders are serious mental health issues. Even if you have not beendirectly impacted by an eating disorder, it’s likely that you have a sister, aunt, friend or boyfriend who has beentouch by them in some way.While the main focus is on raising awareness, prevention and treatment of eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia,binge eating disorder, disordered eating), discussion about the media, culture and body image will be asignificant topic. Everyday we are bombarded with airbrushed images and media that is damaging to our self-esteem. This is the perfect week to discuss how these factors impact the way we eat and see ourselves.The list below has a few examples of events taking place across the country. There are many more available.Speakers:Eating Mindfully Lecture by Dr. Susan Albers. Dr. Albers will be discussing the art of mindful eating at theUniversity of Delawarehttp://www.udel.edu/nedaw/ and www.eatingmindfully.comJenni Schaefer will speak to the community about life after recovery which she describes from personalexperience in her new book, Goodbye Ed, Hello Me: Recover from Your Eating Disorder and Fall in Love withLife. http://www.jennischaefer.com/Nutrition therapist, author and speaker Evelyn Tribole will share her ideas on “Intuitive Eating” during BodyAppreciation Week at SUNY Cortland. The co-author with Elyse Resch of the bestselling book Intuitive Eating,Tribole will discuss “Intuitive Eating: How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind and Body” at 7:30p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, in the Corey Union Function Room. A reception and book signing will follow theevent.Beauty, Body image, Disorder Eating and Campus Life. Free Event. Saturday, Feb 27th The Omni Building,Uniondale Long Island, NYAmerica’s Next Top Model Winner Whitney Thompson Joins NEDA’s Mission to Promote Positive Body Imageand Awareness of Eating Disorders. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is Feb. 21-27. page 2
  27. 27. Kirsten Haglund, Miss America 2008 will Speak during “Love Your Body Day” at the annual UA event onMonday, Feb 22Michael Levine, the Samuel B. Cummings Jr. Professor of Psychology and former chair of the psychologydepartment at Kenyon College, will lecture on “Changing/Challenging the World One American Idol at a Time:What Each of Us Can Do Every Day to Prevent Eating Disorders,” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25, in HerrickHall Auditorium (500 West Loop).Jessica Weiner: http://www.jessweiner.com/ http://www.eatingdisorder.org/events.phpEvening Lecture with Kathryn Zerbe, MD: What’s Your Best Friend Not Telling You? Eating Disorders inAdolescence, Adulthood, Middle Age and Beyond, Thursday, February 18, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.University of Colorado at Boulder Monday, Feb. 26, through Friday, March 2, featuring a variety of freelectures, discussions and therapy booths targeted to both men and women.NEDA WALKS: To sign up for a charity walk. http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/programs-events/nedawareness-week-walk.phpSan Diego NEDA Walk (Crown Point, Mission Bay)Sunday, February 21st. Registration at 9 am; Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Bridgett Whitlow at UCSD Eating Disorders Treatment and Research ClinicSt. Louis NEDA Walk (Tower Grove Park at Sons of Rest Shelter)Saturday, March 27th. Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Kate Evett at McCallum PlaceSeattle NEDA Walk (Cal Anderson Park, Capital Hill, Seattle)Saturday, April 17th. Registration at 10 am, Walk at 11 am.Hosted by NEDANW Ohio NEDA Walk (Olander Park, Sylvania)Sunday, April 25th, Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Jan LockertMilwaukee NEDA Walk (Fowler Lake, Oconomowoc)Sunday, July 18th. Registration at 8:15 am, Walk at 9 am.Hosted by Erin McGinty at The REDI ClinicDocumentaries:America The Beautiful - A Film By Darryl Roberts that’s reveals the modeling industries obsession with beauty.Who/What: “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” is a documentary by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky looking at modernperceptions of beauty – including weight. “Being beautiful is overrated,” says the filmmaker, who interviewedand followed the lives of former beauty pageant queens, a physician, an exotic dancer, an entrepreneur and amusician who worked with famous rock star Prince.“Wet Dreams and False Images” is a Sundance award-winning documentary by Jesse Epstein that utilizeshumor to raise serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion – photo retouching in magazinesand ads – and unrealizable standards of physical perfection. page 2
  28. 28. When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm – 10 pmWhere: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union – B Level, New York, NY 10038.Directions: http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campusThin. by Lauren Greenfield, which portrays various women receiving treatment for eating disordersCandlelight Vigil: Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to Host CandlelightVigil to Increase Awareness of Eating Disorders. Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m. Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Jeans Giveway: Feel comfortable in your jeans. Give your old jeans away to charityBy Dr. Susan Albers, psychologist and author of the new book, 50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food andEating Mindfully. www.eatingmindfully.com Note: Please email DrAlbers@eatingmindfully.com if you wouldlike your event posted here.February 21, 2010Monday Events: Journey Conference»MUNCHKIN MONDAYS, 10-10:45 a.m., Dayspring Christian Academy, 3734 20th St., Greeley. Free music andmovement fun time for pre-school children and parents. Details: (970) 584-2608 or www.DayspringEagles.org.»HOMEWORK HELP, 4-7 p.m., Lincoln Park Library, 919 7th St., Greeley. Homework Help Tutors are available tohelp fifth- to 12th-grade students with their homework. Details: (970) 506-8497.»UNC UNIVERSITY CHOIRS, 7:30 p.m., Union Colony Civic Center, 701 10th Ave., Greeley. $10 adults, $7students. Details: (970) 351-2200.»WOMEN’S NIGHT AT THE ROCK, 6-8 p.m., Greeley Recreation Center, 651 10th Ave., Greeley. These one-nighters are for women only. Our female instructors will provide a good time on the wall and challenge youbeyond your expectations.»GREAT BOOKS READING AND DISCUSSION PROGRAM, 2 p.m., Centennial Park Library, 2227 23rd Ave.,Greeley. “Rothschild’s Fiddle” by Chekhov. Details: (970) 506-8600.»INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, 6 p.m., Evans Community Complex, 1100 37th St., Evans. Free. Details: (970)475-1125. page 2
  29. 29. »THIRD- TO FIFTH-READERS CLUB: CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS, 6-8 p.m., Centennial ParkLibrary, 2227 23rd Ave., Greeley. Watch the wacky movie adaptation from a picture book and also enjoy somespaghetti and meatballs from Noodles Co. Details: (970) 506-8650.»JOURNEY CONFERENCE, 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., UNC University Center Ballroom, 2045 10th Ave., Greeley.Join Eating Recovery Center and the University of Northern Colorado, for the annual Journey Conference topromote growth and leadership among young women. Details: (970) 351-2496.Candlelight Vigil Planned in Denver | Kristen Browning-BlasFebruary 22, 2010 page 2
  30. 30. NEDA Week: It’s Tims to Talk About Eating Disorder Myths Facts | MargaritaFebruary 22, 2010TartakovskyIt’s Time to Talk About It!Yesterday, National Eating Disorders Awareness Week began. The theme for this year is: it’s time to talk abouteating disorders and do one thing to raise awareness. Here are the details, according to NEDA: We live in a culture saturated with unrealistic body-image messages and almost all of us know somebody struggling with an eating disorder. Because this is true, we urge you to talk about it……and do just one thing during NEDAwareness Week to 1) raise awareness that eating disorders are serious illnesses, not lifestyle choices; 2) provide accurate information to medical, educational and/or business communities, and 3) direct people to information and resources about eating disorders.Here are other ways you can participate in NEDA week, according to the organization: -Bring a NEDAwareness Week volunteer speaker to your school, work or social group. -Provide accurate information: Put NEDAwareness Week posters, pamphlets and informational handouts in your schools, community centers, medical offices or workplaces. -Be a Media Watchdog. Write one letter in praise of an ad promoting positive body-image or in protest of an ad promoting negative body-image. -Donate the GO GIRLS! Curriculum to a local high school: Empower youth to become critical media viewers. -Maximize the power of your social networking sites: Re-tweet a fact about eating disorders, put up a link to the NEDA website and Helpline, encourage your contacts to learn more about eating disorders and join you in doing just one thing.Eating Disorder MythsIn honor of NEDA’s theme, let’s talk about eating disorder myths and facts. There are many misconceptionssurrounding eating disorders. I’ve asked several clinicians to share a few myths and facts.Myth: Eating disorders are all about control. (Carolyn Jones, RN, MS, LPC, of the Eating Recover Center clinical psychologist Sarah Ravin, Ph.D)Fact: According to Jones, “Eating disorders are complex and have bio/psycho/social/spiritual componentsin the origin and maintenance of the disease. In fact, when a person feels they are exerting control via theireating disorder, they are really NOT in control as the disease has taken over their life and they cannot interruptthese behaviors without assistance.”Says Dr. Ravin, “I don’t even know what this really means. EDs are not ‘about’ anything other than beingborn with a certain genetic / biological predisposition and certain personality traits, and then experiencingmalnutrition (usually through dieting). People with EDs often have ‘control issues,’ such as being rigid andovercontrolled (anorexia), or impulsive and undercontrolled (bulimia and binge eating disorder), but these page 0
  31. 31. ‘control issues’ are manifestations of the underlying temperament that predisposes people to EDs. Correlationrather than causation is operating here. When people are suffering from EDs, they are not in control of theirthoughts, feelings, or behaviors related to food and weight. And there is no empirical evidence to suggest thatEDs are caused by feeling ‘out of control’ of one’s life.”Myth: Eating disorders are caused by some type of unresolved psychological issue. (Dr. Ravin)Fact: There is no empirical evidence supporting this claim. Granted, most people with EDs do have majorpsychological issues (depression, perfectionism, low self-esteem, body dysmorphia, anxiety, etc.), which co-occur with the ED, but correlation does not necessarily imply causation.Myth: Media is the primary cause for the development of most eating disorders. (Julie Holland, MHS, CEDS,Eating Recovery Center)Fact: Although recent surveys have confirmed that adolescent girls get much of their health information fromthe media, media messages themselves are not a primary cause of eating disorders. Messages that promote anunrealistic thin ideal can set unrealistic standards regarding body size and shape. The fact is, media messageshave the ability to positively or negatively affect one’s body image and/or self-image based on the messageand how it is presented. It is important that we teach individuals critical thinking when looking at mediaimages.Myth: Eating disorders are triggered by a desire to be thin. (Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, Eating RecoveryCenter)Fact: Eating disorder behaviors do not develop merely because an individual has a longing to be thin. Forinstance, an individual who does not know that he or she has wheat or lactose intolerance may develop a fearof food due to the discomfort or pain it causes. Someone in chemotherapy or with a gastrointestinal disordermay stop eating to avoid nausea.Myth: Eating disorders are a choice. (Julie Holland)Fact: Although individuals may choose to start a diet or engage in a certain behaviors, eating disordersthemselves are not a choice. People do not choose to have anorexia or bulimia. These disorders develop overa period of time and require various levels of treatment to address complex symptoms including medical,psychiatric and other underlying issues.Myth: You can tell if someone has an eating disorder just by looking at them. (Marla Scanzello, MS, RD,Eating Recovery Center)Fact: Many people with eating disorders are of normal weight, or even overweight. Weight is not a tell-all signof an eating disorder. Furthermore, eating disorder patients can become quite skilled at hiding their disorderedeating behaviors.Myth: People with eating disorders will eat normally / recover when they choose to do so. (Dr. Ravin)Fact: This myth implies that EDs are willful behavior and that a patient can simply make a choice to recover.Thus, it blames people with EDs for having an illness that is not their fault. Most people with EDs are notable to eat normally on their own; they require significant outside support (nutritionist, parental support inrefeeding, residential tx, etc.) in order to normalize their eating habits. page 1
  32. 32. Myth: Developing a positive body image is not that important in the overall recovery from an eatingdisorder and should be worked on towards the end of the recovery process. (Carolyn Jones)Fact: A continued negative body image is one of the main contributing factors to a relapse in the eatingrecovery process. Improving a person’s body image is one of the hardest and most time-consuming things tochange in the healing process and should be undertaken early during treatment.Myth: Eating disorders are not deadly. (Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Eating Recovery Center)Fact: In all actuality, it is quite the opposite. Eating disorders are the deadliest mental illness. A woman withanorexia nervosa is 5.6 times more likely to die than another woman of her same age. The most frequentcauses of death from eating disorders are suicide (32 percent), complications associated with anorexia (19percent), and cancer (11 percent). The average age of death for an individual with anorexia is only 34 years.Myth: You can never fully recover from an eating disorder. (Julie Holland Sarah Ravin)Fact: According to Holland, “Recovery takes commitment, dedication, hard work and time. However, fullrecovery is absolutely possible through finding the appropriate treatment professionals and program.”According to Dr. Ravin, “The people who believe this are probably those who did not receive treatment,received inadequate or low-quality treatment, lacked the necessary social support, or were never pushed toreach and maintain an ideal body weight and stay there long enough for brain healing to occur. The underlyingbiological predisposition will always be there, but people can and do recover fully from EDs. I’ve seen ithappen many times.”Myths from Women Who’ve Been ThereAs many of you know, I regularly feature QAs with women who’ve struggled and recovered from eatingdisorders. One of the questions I ask is about eating disorder misconceptions, particularly how they’reportrayed in the media. I’ve rounded up a few of the myths from these interviews:From Sarah, That people with ED are selfish. Often, they are excessively empathetic. That the mother/family is to blame, maybe or maybe not, but the individual is important too. That you can’t recover. You can. That weight rather than the eating patterns are important. I’ve seen normal-weight bulimics in MUCH worse physical conditions than anorexics.From Kate Thieda, If you ask the freshmen at the university where I now go to school, they would tell you that eating disorders are fueled by the media—their portrayals of skinny women “having it all.” That may be a piece of it, but that’s not the whole story. No person in this country is insulated from the media, but not every person develops an eating disorder. The person who develops an eating disorder has other issues going on psychologically. The food and exercise behaviors are attempts to manage the deeper pain inside. Another misconception is that eating disorders can be resolved without professional help. There are tons of self-help books, websites and other materials out there, but again, because eating disorders are a symptom of an underlying psychological issue, people need to work with professionals to uncover the deeper problems and work through those. page 2
  33. 33. From Kate Le Page, The media often portrays anorexia as being glamorous or something that is almost fashionable or a lifestyle rather than a disease. Also, many television programs dealing with eating disorders show someone becoming ill and then going into the hospital and magically, upon being discharged, is then portrayed as being 100 percent cured! By writing about being in the hospital, I wanted to show that there is nothing remotely glamorous about spending months fighting a life-threatening condition. Another key misconception is that a person is recovered when they look ‘normal’ and are at target weight. Actually, as every sufferer knows, this is only the beginning of recovery. As Katharine Wealthall eloquently describes it in her book Little Steps, “If treating anorexia is like reading a big book, then target weight is just the introduction.” I still cringe when someone says you look well, as how can you see a disease that is predominantly mental just by looking at my appearance?! Also, it is important to recognize that a person can be seriously malnourished by vomiting/over-exercising whilst still eating a ‘normal’ diet.From Becky Oot, *That it isn’t a valid medical condition. I’m infuriated when I see insurance companies refusing to cover treatment for eating disorders. * People who have eating disorders are always skinny. Not true. There are so many kinds of eating disorders that it is almost impossible to diagnose a person just by looking at them. *Eating disorders are about food. Again, not true. The eating disorder is just a symptom of much deeper, complex issues.From Kendra Sebellius, There is often a lot of media about anorexia and bulimia, but the majority of people who struggle with eating disorders do not fit nicely into these DSM boxes. A majority of people fit in the EDNOS (Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified) and BED (binge eating disorder) descriptions. Since I am an advocate I read a lot of articles, and search daily for ones to post on my Voice in Recovery Facebook page. I think eating disorders do get a lot of great press. I do worry more about trash media articles, because often the articles sound cliché, and make it sound like eating disorders are a willpower issue and not a complicated biological, chemical, cultural, environmental disorder. Some articles make it sound like people choose to have an eating disorder. I know a lot of the pro-ana websites say it is a lifestyle – which is absolutely untrue and dangerous. I think there’s also a lot of media attention on those who struggle with eating disorders, and a lot of people sharing their story of their struggle, but often I wish there would be more news on recovery. I personally felt lost in recovery because I had no idea what recovery meant, what it looked like, what the experience was like, what the struggles were, etc. This is the reason I started being an advocate – to learn and share what recovery looks like. I wish there were more books focusing on recovery, and how to handle struggles in recovery. I think if I had found a community online focused on recovery, it would have helped me immensely. This is why I love doing my Voice in Recovery advocacy, and being part of the page
  34. 34. MentorConnect program. I think AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) is great because you have a sponsor, and I love how MentorConnect has this ability for those who struggle, to be able to have a mentor to share the struggles with. I do worry about the media’s representation of eating disorders. I have seen TV shows that show ED behaviors and then never address them as serious issues. I worry that because dieting is running rampant in this country by a multi-billion dollar industry, that parents will see dieting as a girl’s “right of passage.” I worry people will start dieting and end up with eating disorders. I believe the diet industry is a very damaging, powerful industry. I watch the media, and the news, and am grateful there is so much eating disorder awareness. I think it is a daily worry though, that clichés and misconceptions are thrown into media articles. This can make it harder for those who really struggle, and the loved ones trying to help.From Michelle Myers, People think it’s just about food. Recovery should be simple – just EAT! But it’s not that simple, and it’s not just about food. There are a plethora of life experiences that add up to disordered eating, and those issues must rise to the surface in order to experience recovery. I think another misconception is that eating disorders never fully go away, and once you have one, you will always struggle with it. I believe that is only true if you only address the physical side of the disorder. However, the deeper issues behind an eating disorder are emotional, mental and spiritual. If you achieve peace in those areas, I believe full recovery is possible.What eating disorder myth would you add to the list? What are your thoughts on the above myths? Howwill you spread the word about eating disorders?And…A Great GiveawayI’m thrilled to be giving away a few copies of some fantastic books. I have one copy of Beating Ana: Howto Outsmart Your Eating Disorder Take Your Life Back, written by Shannon Cutts, and two copies of 100Questions and Answers About Anorexia Nervosa by eating disorder specialist Sari Shepphird, Ph.D. I highlyrecommend these books, and I’m so thankful to both women for providing these copies.To be eligible to win a copy, just respond to this week’s posts. The winners will be randomly chosen this Sundayusing Random.org. The last day to leave a comment will be Sunday at 12 p.m. EST.Stayed tuned tomorrow when eating disorder survivor and advocate Andrea Roe shares her story!Update: Check out parts one and two of Andrea’s interview on her recovery. Also, Andrea has generouslyoffered to give away a copy of her book, You Are Not Alone, which comes with a CD by Shannon Cutts. Samerules apply as above. page
  35. 35. Weighing the facts | Wendy ZookFebruary 23, 2010One-size-fits-all not true when it comes to reasons behind eating disorders lineup of 10 friends, parents,siblings or co-workers might hold an interesting surprise. According to the National Eating DisordersAssociation, about four of them either have suffered or have known someone who has suffered from an eatingdisorder.Most of the time, NEDA Helpline supervisor William Walters said, secrecy and shame keep someone with aneating disorder from coming out and getting help.“If a person in your family had cancer, they would talk about it, get help, see a specialized doctor and havetheir family come around them,” Walters said. “When it comes to eating disorders, society tends to stigmatize,tends to blame the individual and tends to minimize the seriousness of it.”Lynn Grefe, NEDA’s chief executive officer, said the theme of this week’s 23rd annual eating disordersawareness week is, “It’s Time to Talk About it.”“It really is time to talk about eating disorders, because people die, with anorexia having the highest death rateof any mental illness,” Grefe said. “The sooner we get people to talk about it, the sooner we can get people thehelp they need.”Among the 40 percent of those affected by eating disorders are entertainer Paula Abdul, “Family Ties”actress Justine Bateman, both one-time bulimics, and “Growing Pains” star Tracy Gold, who suffered fromanorexia. Oprah Winfrey has said she dealt with abusive relationships by overeating to “cushion herself againstdisapproval.”It’s not just an American problem and it doesn’t just affect young women. Singer Elton John has spoken outabout his battles with bulimia and an eating disorder that dealt with chewing and then spitting out his food,and fitness guru Richard Simmons turned his experiences with overeating and dieting into his famous weight-loss programState-College area licensed professional counselor Tracey Zuiker said that the more often celebrities comeforward with their stories, the more it will help provide a better understanding of these diseases.“This is encouraging,” Zuiker said of celebrities speaking out. “It offers hope for those suffering and helps todecrease the stigma attached to eating disorders.”In the United States, according to the Eating Recovery Center in Colorado, 80 percent of females aredissatisfied with their appearance and 81 percent of 10-year-olds are afraid of being fat; the average Americanmodel is thinner than 98 percent of American women.“Our society has become a very appearance-based, somewhat superficial atmosphere,” Penn State Altoona page
  36. 36. athletic trainer Sue Barkman said. “When you get down to the actual root of an eating disorder, that can bepart of the problem, but it is certainly not the root of the problem.”While distorted and unattainable standards of physical beauty Fact Box Cutting through the mythsmay contribute to the development of an eating disorder, Zuiker Preconceptions often inaccurate ones can keepemphasized that there’s much more to these complex diseases. those affected from realizing just how serious eating disorders can be.“At the core, these individuals are not simply trying to be thin,”Zuiker said. “One of the biggest misconceptions is that eating -- Only teenage girls suffer from eatingdisorders are simply about vanity. Eating disorders are complex disorders.and the contributing factors behind the development of an FALSE. Eating disorders affect middle-agedeating disorder are highly unique to each individual.” women, children, men, the elderly and just about anyone. “It holds no barriers, it has no“Our society has become a very appearance-based, somewhat prejudice,” Liz Heckman, a St. Francis studentsuperficial atmosphere,” Penn State Altoona athletic trainer Sue and eating disorder survivor, says. According to the National Eating Disorders Association,Barkman said. 10 percent of eating-disordered individuals are male.While distorted and unattainable standards of physical beautyadd to the pressure of developing an eating disorder, Zuiker -- Anorexia, the self-starvation of a person, andemphasized that there’s much more to these complex diseases. bulimia, which involves bingeing and purging of food, are the only types of eating disorders.“At the core, these individuals are not simply trying to be thin,” FALSE. In addition to over-exercising, there isZuiker said. “One of the biggest misconceptions is that eating binge-dating disorder, with periods of bingeingdisorders are simply about vanity. Eating disorders are complex on large amounts of food without countering itand the contributing factors behind the development of an by exercise or other means, according to NEDA.eating disorder are highly unique to each individual.” -- Eating disorders are a choice, or are solely about food.Recent research in the field offers a more scientific explanation, FALSE. “It’s really a psychological issue,”Zuiker said. Sepp said. “It’s not a food thing. It’s a control thing.” Adds Heckman: “It is a disease. It’s not“Much of the current research is now even looking into genetic something that’s in somebody’s head. It’s notfactors as well as biochemical indicators,” she said. “There’s about losing weight. I doubt that any personreally a lot that’s coming into focus with genetics. There are would willingly go to these extremes.”certain genes present in most people with eating disorders thatwhile they don’t cause eating disorders, it makes them more -- Eating disorders are chic and glamorous.vulnerable.” FALSE. Eating disorders are the most deadly mental illness, according to NEDA, and can have long-term effects and consequences, includingLiz Heckman is a sophomore at St. Francis University in Loretto. heart problems, esophagus ruptures, losing hair,She just marked three years since being released from an irregular or absent periods in women, fertilityintensive treatment program in Hershey for a three-year-long issues, rotting or missing teeth, irregular bowelbattle with bulimia. The teen was admitted into a hospital when movements or constipation, muscle loss andshe was 16 after losing several pounds and becoming obsessed weakness, kidney and other organ failures,with her weight, losing her hair and fainting in public from a lack osteoporosis and many more problems.of energy and nutrients. Source: mirror-mirror.org, National Eating Disorders Association, survivor Liz Heckman and Altoona Regional“It doesn’t really sink in,” Heckman, a native of the Reading Health System dietitian Pam Sepp.area, said about the severity of eating disorders and possibleconsequences. “I knew I didn’t want to die, but I didn’t want to stop.” page
  37. 37. Since beginning her recovery, Heckman has lobbied for easier treatment access for all psychiatric diseases,including eating disorders, by writing letters to federal and state legislators.She also used her experiences as a former bulimic to come up with a guide that educators can use withstudents they come across on a daily basis to help them identify the symptoms of an eating disorder earlierand to help get those students the treatment they need.Last fall, Heckman held a Beauty Lies Within fashion show that featured models of all sizes and shapes andher own personal testimony. More than 100 people attended the event and about 60 signed promises to fightweight obsession beginning with themselves.“To see something that’s so dear to my heart come to fruition, it’s very humbling,” Heckman said. “Being asurvivor myself, it’s critical that I make it so people understand that it’s not what most people think it is.”Altoona Regional Health System dietitian Pam Sepp has seen men and women of all ages with a variety ofsymptoms and levels of commitment to making it to recovery.“It’s really a psychological issue,” she said. “It’s not a food thing. It’s a control thing. These girls can look in themirror and see themselves as being really heavy. It’s really sad. It’s really, really sad.”These diseases, a complex affliction of the body and mind, “are absolutely treatable,” Zuiker said.However, Barkman adds, “It will not get better without help.”Attend National Eating Disorder Week Events | Dr. Susan AlbersFebruary 23, 2010If you weren’t aware of it, this is National Eating Disorder Awareness Week (February 21st-27th) sponsored bythe National Eating Disorders Organization. There are a number of events taking place all across the country inhonor of this week.Why is this week important? Eating disorders are serious mental health issues. Even if you have not beendirectly impacted by an eating disorder, it’s likely that you have a sister, aunt, friend or boyfriend who has beentouch by them in some way.While the main focus is on raising awareness, prevention and treatment of eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia,binge eating disorder, disordered eating), discussion about the media, culture and body image will be asignificant topic. Everyday we are bombarded with airbrushed images and media that is damaging to our self-esteem. This is the perfect week to discuss how these factors impact the way we eat and see ourselves.If you are interested in getting involved, you will find free screenings, fashion shows, scale smashings,documentaries, and lectures. Many events are taking place or sponsored by universities and health fairs. Ifyou’d like to find out what is happening in your area, contact www.nationaleatingdisorders.org page
  38. 38. The list below has a few examples of events taking place across the country. There are many more available.Speakers:Eating Mindfully Lecture by Dr. Susan Albers. Dr. Albers will be discussing the art of mindful eating at theUniversity of Delawarehttp://www.udel.edu/nedaw/ andwww.eatingmindfully.comJenni Schaefer will speak to the community about life after recovery which she describes from personalexperience in her new book, Goodbye Ed, Hello Me: Recover from Your Eating Disorder and Fall in Love withLife. http://www.jennischaefer.com/Nutrition therapist, author and speaker Evelyn Tribole will share her ideas on “Intuitive Eating” during BodyAppreciation Week at SUNY Cortland. The co-author with Elyse Resch of the bestselling book Intuitive Eating,Tribole will discuss Intuitive Eating: How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind and Body at 7:30p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, in the Corey Union Function Room. A reception and book signing will follow theevent.Beauty, Body image, Disorder Eating and Campus Life. Free Event. Saturday, Feb 27th The Omni Building,Uniondale Long Island, NYAmerica’s Next Top Model Winner Whitney Thompson Joins NEDA’s Mission to Promote Positive Body Imageand Awareness of Eating Disorders. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is Feb. 21-27.Kirsten Haglund, Miss America 2008 will Speak during “Love Your Body Day” at the annual UA event onMonday, Feb 22Michael Levine, the Samuel B. Cummings Jr. Professor of Psychology and former chair of the psychologydepartment at Kenyon College, will lecture on “Changing/Challenging the World One American Idol at a Time:What Each of Us Can Do Every Day to Prevent Eating Disorders,” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25, in HerrickHall Auditorium (500 West Loop).Jessica Weiner: http://www.jessweiner.com/ http://www.eatingdisorder.org/events.phpEvening Lecture with Kathryn Zerbe, MD: What’s Your Best Friend Not Telling You? Eating Disorders inAdolescence, Adulthood, Middle Age and Beyond, Thursday, February 18, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.University of Colorado at Boulder Monday, Feb. 26, through Friday, March 2, featuring a variety of freelectures, discussions and therapy booths targeted to both men and women.NEDA WALKS: To sign up for a charity walkSan Diego NEDA Walk (Crown Point, Mission Bay)Sunday, February 21st. Registration at 9 am; Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Bridgett Whitlow at UCSD Eating Disorders Treatment and Research ClinicSt. Louis NEDA Walk (Tower Grove Park at Sons of Rest Shelter)Saturday, March 27th. Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Kate Evett at McCallum Place page
  39. 39. Seattle NEDA Walk (Cal Anderson Park, Capital Hill, Seattle)Saturday, April 17th. Registration at 10 am, Walk at 11 am.Hosted by NEDANW Ohio NEDA Walk (Olander Park, Sylvania)Sunday, April 25th, Walk at 10 am.Hosted by Jan LockertMilwaukee NEDA Walk (Fowler Lake, Oconomowoc)Sunday, July 18th. Registration at 8:15 am, Walk at 9 am.Hosted by Erin McGinty at The REDI ClinicDocumentaries:America The Beautiful - A Film By Darryl Roberts that’s reveals the modeling industries obsession with beauty.Who/What: “Beauty in the Eyes of the Beheld” is a documentary by Liza Figueroa Kravinsky looking at modernperceptions of beauty - including weight. “Being beautiful is overrated,” says the filmmaker, who interviewedand followed the lives of former beauty pageant queens, a physician, an exotic dancer, an entrepreneur and amusician who worked with famous rock star Prince.“Wet Dreams and False Images” is a Sundance award-winning documentary by Jesse Epstein that utilizeshumor to raise serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion - photo retouching in magazinesand ads - and unrealizable standards of physical perfection.When: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 pm - 10 pmWhere: Pace University/East of City Hall, One Pace Plaza, Student Union - B Level, New York, NY 10038.Directions: http://www.pace.edu/pace/about-us/all-about-pace/directions-to-all-campuses/new-york-city-campusThin. by Lauren Greenfield, which portrays various women receiving treatment for eating disordersCandlelight Vigil: Eating Recovery Center Partners with The Eating Disorder Foundation to Host Candlelight Vigilto Increase Awareness of Eating Disorders. Candlelight Vigil and Wine ReceptionWhen: Tuesday, February 23, 2010. Complimentary wine reception to start at 5 p.m.Vigil to follow at 6:30 p.m. Where: Wellshire Event Center (formerly Wellshire Inn)3333 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80222Jeans Giveway: Feel comfortable in your jeans. Give your old jeans away to charity page
  40. 40. February 25, 2010Interview with Dr. WeinerPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video.11 News Special Report: Disorderly Conduct | Lauren WhitneyFebruary 25, 2010Please see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video.February 26, 2010Interview with Dr. WeinerPlease see the DVD at the back of the clipbook for a full video. page 0
  41. 41. A Place People Would Want to Be | Lindsay BarbaMarch 1, 2010 page 1
  42. 42. page 2
  43. 43. page
  44. 44. page
  45. 45. The Role of Temperament in Eating Disorders | Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDSMarch 1, 2010Temperament refers to those aspects of an individual’s personality, such as introversion or extroversion, whichare often regarded as innate rather than learned. Differences in temperament are determined by individualvariations in perception of physical sensations as well as variations in processes of selective attention andemotional salience. This means that, in a sense, individuals with different temperaments see the worldthrough a different lens.These innate personality traits can play a significant role not only in an individuals’ predisposition to an eatingdisorder, but also in their maintenance of an eating disorder. By understanding the specific temperamentaltraits that are common among individuals with eating disorders, clinicians can form a more targeted, informedapproach to treatment and look to newer psychotherapies for guidance.Adapted from C. Robert Cloninger’s Temperament Character Inventory, the four key temperament dimensionsassociated with eating disorders and the characteristics of high and low scorers on each dimension aredescribed below.1. Harm AvoidanceThe harm avoidance dimension of temperament, often intense in eating disordered persons, is an expressionof the behavioral inhibition system of the brain. Those who are high in this temperament trait tend tooverestimate the risk of hurt. They feel the somatic aspects of anxiety more intensely than the averageperson. Consequently, they are more cautious, fearful, tense, timid, apprehensive, doubtful, passive,negative or pessimistic in situations which do not worry other people. They tend to be inhibited and shy insocial situations. Their cautious nature has an adaptive advantage when there are real risks but can be animpediment to healthy change in treatment due to their excessive avoidance of new experiences.High harm avoidance contributes to a life centered on anxiety management with an eating disorder. Eatingdisordered patients often report that they spend a major portion of their waking existence thinking aboutcontrolling their anxiety about eating, shape and weight. The eating disorder becomes the main tactic formentally avoiding life’s anxieties.2. Novelty SeekingNovelty seeking is a pre-conceptual bias in the brain which relates to behavioral activation. Those withhigh novelty seeking are drawn to the new and stimulating. Such individuals are quick-tempered, excitable,exploratory, enthusiastic, exuberant, curious, easily bored, impulsive and disorderly. It is not surprising thathigh novelty seeking is associated with binge/purge behavior. Higher novelty seeking is seen in bulimia nervosacases, anorexia nervosa cases with binge/purge behaviors, and is also associated with diagnostic cross-overfrom anorexia to bulimia.On the other hand, individuals with low novelty seeking temperaments are slow tempered, non-inquisitive, page
  46. 46. unenthusiastic, stoical, reflective, frugal, reserved, tolerant of monotony, systematic and orderly. In eatingdisordered patients, low novelty seeking is seen in restricting anorexic patients. Such individuals tend to beslaves to routines and rituals because they like things to be orderly.3. Reward DependenceThe behavioral maintenance system of the brain is represented by the temperament trait of rewarddependence. The reward dependence trait is manifested by individual differences in response to socialreward. Those who are high in this trait are tender-hearted, sensitive, socially dependent, warm and sociable.They easily form emotional attachments. High reward dependence can be advantageous when sensitivity tosocial cues is needed and the capacity to understand the feelings of others is beneficial. A disadvantage ofhigh reward dependence ensues from being easily influenced by emotional appeals. Reward dependence isnot consistently associated with diagnosis but can significantly impact treatment issues such as therapeuticalliance.4. PersistencePersistence is a bias in the brain which concerns maintenance of behavior in the face of frustration,punishment, fatigue and intermittent reward. Highly persistent individuals tend to be hard-working andambitious overachievers. High persistence is associated with anorexia nervosa and consistent with their well-known perfectionism and inability to shift mental sets to a more healthy orientation.As we comprehend the structure of temperament and how it relates to the intuitive senses, we can grasp thelimitations of many current treatments for eating disorders. We can then begin to make the case for many ofthe strategies employed by some of the newer psychotherapies, which focus on building mindfulness skills,acceptance strategies and transcendent sense of self; targeting experiential or emotional avoidance; buildingawareness of rule governance; understanding valued-life direction; and focusing on coherence seeking andconnection.Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDSDirector of Outpatient Services and Research and Founding Partner of Eating Recovery Center, Dr. Bishop has more than 30 yearsof experience in the treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Bishop designed the multilevel Clarke Center Eating Disorder Program andhas completed systematic research in the field. He served as the past president and current board member for the InternationalAssociation of Eating Disorders Professionals. Dr. Bishop is also an Approved iaedp Supervisor and sits on the editorial board of EatingDisorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. Additionally, he is a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders. page
  47. 47. March 17, 2010Status UpdateEating disorders in college, a helpful brochure (it’s a pdf file) from @EatingRecovery: http://bit.ly/c1YL71 Thx @colomolz for sending! :)March 26, 2010Status UpdateEating Disorder Hope proudly announces the addition of Eating Recovery Center to ourcomprehensive Eating Disorder... http://bit.ly/9XIISx **Digital Outreach**March 18, 2010Dangers of Spring Break DietingIf you have a student in college, spring break has either just begun or will be starting soon. Students often feelpressure to improve their appearance prior to spring break, and the desire to rapidly lose weight before springbreak in conjunction with the desire to party during spring break can lead to a dangerous, preliminary formof disordered eating called Drunkorexia. Replacing food calories with alcohol calories is not only dangerousit can be damaging to your overall health. It’s important to talk to your student about the dangers associatedwith dieting for spring break. For more information on drunkorexia or eating disorders in college, click here fora informative flyer from Eating Recovery Center. (www.eatingrecoverycenter.com/pdf/ERC_College_FIN.pdf). Ihope this information is helpful! page
  48. 48. March 26, 2010Eating Recovery Center Now Featured in the Eating Disorder Hope Specialist LibraryEating Disorder Hope proudly announces the addition of Eating Recovery Center to our comprehensive EatingDisorder Specialist Library. Eating Recovery Center, situated at the foot of the Rockies in beautiful downtown Denver, Colorado, provides individuals 17 and older sustainable recovery from eating disorders. Our comprehensive program offers patients from across the country a continuum of care that includes inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and outpatient services. Founded by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, and Emmett R. Bishop, MD, CEDS, renowned experts with more than 50 years of combined experience, Eating Recovery Center proves to be the culmination of their vision and expertise. Medical Management As a licensed Joint Commission accredited behavioral hospital, Eating Recovery Center’s 24/7 medical management, nursing care and clinical supervision enhance each patient’s stay. Full-time psychiatrists personally oversee the treatment regimen of every patient while an internist and nursing team managepatients’ medical needs. Close proximity to two major hospitals allows a seamless transition to acute care ifmedical intervention is necessary.For extremely low-weight patients in a life-threatening condition, medical stabilization may be necessaryprior to admission. In such circumstances, support from Dr. Phil Mehler, Chief Medical Officer and worldexpert on the medical complication of eating disorders at Denver Health Medical Center’s A.C.U.T.E. (AcuteComprehensive Urgent Treatment for Eating Disorders) program, is readily available.Treatment ProgramEating Recovery Center’s uniquely integrated treatment program cultivates lasting behavioral change andsustains long-term recovery. Putting research into practice, our treatment philosophy is drawn from innovativetherapeutic methods centered on mindfulness, values orientation and collaboration with loved ones. We arecommitted to a seamless transition to aftercare and partnership with each patient’s treating professional. page
  49. 49. FacilityIntegrating state-of-the-art design with a warm and nurturing environment, our facility enhances thetherapeutic experience through dedicated art therapy, cooking education and massage areas.Treatment ProfessionalsOur collaborative team of treatment professionals is not only highly respected for their expertise in the field,but also passionate about each patient’s lasting recovery. This multidisciplinary team includes Certified EatingDisorder Specialists and iaedpTM approved supervisors.Highlights and FeaturesJoint Commission Accredited behavioral hospitalCollaboration with referring professionalsServices range from acute inpatient hospitalization to flexible outpatient programsSafe and secure location adjacent to a medical complexMedical management with 24/7 nursingIndividual and family counselorsPersonalized meal plans designed by registered dieticiansClasses on meal creation, menu selection and cooking taught by skilled chefsPatients participate in their own weekly treatment meetingsClear discharge treatment plansAftercare coordinator works closely with patients and referring professionalsResourcesEating Recovery Center has published a number of informational flyers focused on topics related to eatingdisorders awareness and treatment. Please contact us to request a copy of one of our flyers or researchpapers:-Eating Disorders and Insurance 101-Eating Disorders in College-Navigating Holiday Eating with Confidence-Eating Recovery Center’s Report on Referral PracticesLocation/Contact Information1830 Franklin Street, Suite 500Denver, Colorado 80218Toll free: 877-825-8584Office: 303-825-8584Fax: 303-825-8585For more information email: info@eatingrecoverycenter.comVisit our website: www.EatingRecoveryCenter.comChat with us confidentially at www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com. page
  50. 50. Eating Disorders in College | Julie HollandApril 7, 2010 Transitioning to college means a new freedom-filled life with new life paths and lasting relationships; what if this major transition contributes to an eating disorder?Eating disorders can be triggered by any number of life-changing events. But the transition to college, morethan nearly any other time, creates a “perfect storm” of stress, changes and new experiences that can spur thedevelopment of anorexia and bulimia.How do you know when there is cause for concern? Look for the following warning signs, which may indicatean eating disorder.Recognizing the Warning SignsWarning Signs of Anorexia Nervosa• Dramatic weight loss; a preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams and dieting; denying hunger.• Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss; withdrawal from usual friends and activities.• Development of food rituals and excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food. An excessive, rigid exercise regimen–despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury.Warning Signs of Bulimia Nervosa• Evidence of binge eating (i.e. disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time, evidence of purging behaviors). Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting and presence of laxatives or diuretics.• Creation of complex lifestyle schedules or rituals to make time for binge-and-purge sessions and/or an excessive, rigid exercise regime–despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury.• Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area, a discoloration or staining of the teeth, and/or calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.Intervening When It Matters MostEating disorders do not simply impact one person. These diseases impact the entire support system (family,friends, roommates and educators).If you’re concerned about a friend or family member’s eating and/or exercise habits, set aside a time for aprivate, respectful meeting to discuss your concerns. Try to avoid conflict or struggles and leave yourself openand available as a supportive listener. Remember, overcoming an eating disorder is not a simple task. Whenvoicing your concerns, try to avoid “you” statements such as, “You just need to eat.” Instead, focus on “I”statements that convey your worry and concern for their wellbeing. page 0
  51. 51. Providing Support During and After TreatmentLearning how to respond and interact with someone who has an eating disorder can help him or her feel fullysupported throughout the entire process. Here are four tips for supporting your friend or family member whois struggling with an eating disorder:• Avoid talk about food, weight, diets or body shape–your own, your family member’s, your friend’s or even a popular celebrity’s.• Avoid being too watchful of your eating habits, appetites and choices.• Focus on their strengths.• Avoid focusing on how your friend or family member looks physicallyUsing Your ResourcesCollege campuses across the county have a variety of resources: counseling services, advisors and teachers,student health facilities, resident assistants and local medical professionals. All are available to offer advice,support and recommendations for treatment.If an eating disorder escalates, your friend or family member may need to seek treatment at a facilityspecializing in eating disorder care. It is important to choose a treatment facility based on what fits your friendor family member’s needs in order to experience a lasting recovery.Food-centric Festivities and Eating Disorders | Julie HollandApril 7, 2010From Memorial Day to Labor Day, the summer months are packed with family barbeques, afternoon picnicsand camping trips filled with campfire-cooked hot dogs and s’mores. For someone recovering from an eatingdisorder, these food-centric festivities can be overwhelming.The key to success is preparation. Know the details of events to minimize the stress, anxiety and fear oftenassociated with parties and gatherings involving food. Don’t be afraid to rely on the support of family, friendsand treatment professionals. It will go a long way toward successfully navigating these challenging times.Try switching your focus away from the food at these festivities.Instead focus on catching up with friends, playing a game or helping younger family members set off fireworksfor the 4th of July. Here are a few more tips and advice for summer celebrations whether you’re in recovery orknow someone who is:Tips for Those in Recovery• Shift the focus from food and counting calories to celebrating and spending time with loved ones.• Know how to take a break and step back when events become overwhelming.• Surround yourself with people who have healthy relationships with their bodies, food and weight. When attending gatherings, bring a trusted family member or friend with you if you can.• If you are comfortable doing so, share information about your eating disorder with family and friends. Knowing this is a difficult time for you will help them provide support. page 1
  52. 52. Tips To Help a Family Member or Friend with an Eating Disorder• Have patience and ask your family member or friend what you can do to best support them.• Be aware of the comments you make, especially around a friend or loved one recovering from disordered eating. Don’t dwell on topics such as diets, calorie counting, weight or even portion sizes.• Develop some sort of signal or sign that your family member or friend can use when he or she needs a subject change or a moment away to regroup.• Make recovery a priority; remember to celebrate the small steps and accomplishments.Embracing summer celebrations means realizing where your family member, friend or you are in the recoveryprocess. Always make sure you’re aware of the resources available to you. Treatment professionals, supportgroups and therapy can be significant assets when struggling with disordered eating during the summermonths.Healthy Body Image in Kids | Julie HollandApril 15, 2010Raising children with healthy body images and a strong sense of self-respect is one thing; doing so whenyou’ve had an eating disorder is a separate task. Each day I strive to instill a positive body image in my 8-year-old daughter while maintaining my own healthy body image and relationship with food post-eating disorder.At the age of seven, I developed binge eating disorder. This eventually transitioned into anorexia nervosa andbulimia nervosa, which I struggled with through much of my high school career.I don’t want my daughter to have the same experience. As a recovered adult, mom and eating disorderprofessional, I recommend using the following tips and games with your kids to turn negative thinking patternsinto positive ones:• Don’t label food as ‘good food’ or ‘bad food’.• Encourage children to focus on the wonderful things their bodies can do for them, not solely how they look or appear.• Learn to question the messages portrayed in the media and help children become critical thinkers that do not accept these things at face value.• Be active; exercise and body movement are ways to counteract negative body talk.• Compliment yourself and your children frequently; even make a game out of it (e.g. Every time I see a red car today, I will say something positive about myself).It’s also important to surround yourself with other people who have healthy relationships with their bodyshape and size and don’t support “fat talk.” This type of talk exists whenever somebody says somethingnegative about themselves or someone else, such as “I don’t like that picture, it shows my double chin,” or, “Iwon’t wear that until I lose five pounds.”Remember, children and teens take what we say or comment on to heart. In an effort to create and maintainpositive body image in children, we must remember to be positive role models for them and avoid our ownnegative comments. page 2
  53. 53. April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eating Disorder Patients at Upcoming Workshop May 13 Workshop Will Focus on Comprehensive Medical and Psychiatric Interventions and Treatment TechniquesInnovative approaches to treating severely medically compromised eating disorders patients will be the focusof a day-long workshop presented by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, andPhilip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS, preeminent experts with more than 75 years of combined clinical experience.The workshop, “Treatment of Eating Disorders from Outpatient to Intensive Care: Medical, PsychiatricInterventions and Treatment Techniques,” is offered Thursday, May 13, 2010 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., inconjunction with “Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” the Ben FranklinInstitute’s annual eating disorders conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.“This workshop will offer eating disorder professionals the opportunity to learn insights we have gained whilespecializing in the treatment of patients with severe anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and other eatingdisorders,” said Weiner, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and JointCommissioned accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recoveryfor eating disorders. “Leveraging this experience, we consistently look to research and promising practices todevelop a multidisciplinary, cutting-edge approach to treatment.”Addressing the unique treatment needs of these acute eating disorder patients, as well as those requiringlower levels of care, the workshop will focus on these topics:Weiner will offer innovative strategies for approaching co-morbidity and discuss pharmacologic interventionsand level of care implications.Bishop, founding partner and director of research and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center, willintegrate and assimilate the latest advances in eating disorders therapy into a cohesive cutting-edge treatmentmodel, introducing innovative treatment techniques such as Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT).Mehler, chief medical officer of Denver Health Medical Center and founder of the A.C.U.T.E. Center for EatingDisorders, which specializes in medical stabilization of the sickest eating disorder cases in the nation, willdiscuss eating disorders’ medical complications, and offer strategies for effectively and efficiently preventingand treating these problems.“Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” is May 13-16, 2010 at The GreenValley Ranch Resort and Spa. Registration for the workshop and conference is available at http://www.bfisummit.com. page
  54. 54. **Digital Outreach**April 15, 2010Eating Recovery Center Offers Insights Into Treating Severely MedicallyCompromised Eating Disorder Patients at Upcoming Workshop May 13 Workshop Will Focus on Comprehensive Medical and Psychiatric Interventions and Treatment TechniquesInnovative approaches to treating severely medically compromised eating disorders patients will be the focusof a day-long workshop presented by Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, CEDS, Emmett R. Bishop, Jr., MD, CEDS, andPhilip Mehler, MD, FACP, CEDS, preeminent experts with more than 75 years of combined clinical experience.The workshop, “Treatment of Eating Disorders from Outpatient to Intensive Care: Medical, PsychiatricInterventions and Treatment Techniques,” is offered Thursday, May 13, 2010 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., inconjunction with “Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” the Ben FranklinInstitute’s annual eating disorders conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.“This workshop will offer eating disorder professionals the opportunity to learn insights we have gained whilespecializing in the treatment of patients with severe anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and other eatingdisorders,” said Weiner, founding partner and medical director of Eating Recovery Center, a licensed and JointCommissioned accredited behavioral hospital providing comprehensive treatment and sustainable recoveryfor eating disorders. “Leveraging this experience, we consistently look to research and promising practices todevelop a multidisciplinary, cutting-edge approach to treatment.”Addressing the unique treatment needs of these acute eating disorder patients, as well as those requiringlower levels of care, the workshop will focus on these topics:Weiner will offer innovative strategies for approaching co-morbidity and discuss pharmacologic interventionsand level of care implications.Bishop, founding partner and director of research and outpatient services at Eating Recovery Center, willintegrate and assimilate the latest advances in eating disorders therapy into a cohesive cutting-edge treatmentmodel, introducing innovative treatment techniques such as Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT).Mehler, chief medical officer of Denver Health Medical Center and founder of the A.C.U.T.E. Center for EatingDisorders, which specializes in medical stabilization of the sickest eating disorder cases in the nation, willdiscuss eating disorders’ medical complications, and offer strategies for effectively and efficiently preventingand treating these problems.“Clinical Recipes for Success: Advanced Treatments for Eating Disorders,” is May 13-16, 2010 at The GreenValley Ranch Resort and Spa. Registration for the workshop and conference is available at http://www.bfisummit.com. page
  55. 55. April 16, 2010Event Listing: BFI WorkshopBFI Workshop Mention | Margarita TartakovskyApril 20, 2010--On a side note, if you’re an eating disorder professional, you may be interested in an upcoming conference inLas Vegas this May (see here for more info) on advanced treatments for eating disorders. Speakers include KenWeiner, M.D., Walter Kaye, M.D., Ann Kearney-Cooke, Ph.D, and Margo Maine, Ph.D., and Jenni Schaefer. page

×