Pneumonia	           Greg	  Schumaker,	  MD	              Assistant	  Professor	  Pulmonary,	  Cri;cal	  Care	  &	  Sleep	...
Overview	  •  Diagnosis	  •  Epidemiology	  /Microbiology	  •  Triage/Severity	  Scoring	  •  Treatment	  •  Special	  Pop...
Types	  of	  Pneumonia	  •      Community-­‐acquired	  	     -­‐	  Present	  on	  admit	  or	  within	  1st	  48	  hours	 ...
Epidemiology                                   	  •  450	  million	  cases	  worldwide	  •  4	  million	  deaths	  per	  y...
Preven;on	  •  Vaccina;on	  	   -­‐	  Hib,	  pertussis,	  measles,	  pneumococcus	  	   -­‐	  up	  to	  30%	  reduc;on	  i...
Epidemiology	  •  Common	  cause	  of	  sepsis	  •  7th	  leading	  cause	  of	  death	  •  5-­‐6	  million	  pa;ents/year...
Microbiology	  •  S.	  pneumo	  remains	  most	  common	  	  bacteria	  •  Influenza	  most	  common	  virus	  	   -­‐	  RS...
Microbiology	  -­‐	  Bacteria	  •  Typical	  	   -­‐	  S.	  pneumo	  	   -­‐	  H.	  influenza	  	   -­‐	  Moraxella	  	   -...
Microbiology	  -­‐	  Bacteria	  •  Atypical	  Bacteria	  	   -­‐	  Legionella	  	   -­‐	  Mycoplasma	  	   -­‐	  Chlamydia...
•  Table	  6.	  	  	  Most	  common	  e0ologies	  of	  community-­‐acquired	     pneumonia.	  	     Pa;ent	  type	   	    ...
Table	  6.	  	  	  Most	  common	  e0ologies	  of	  community-­‐  acquired	  pneumonia.	  Pa;ent	  type	         	      E;...
Specific	  Bugs	  •  S.	  pneumo	  	   -­‐	  Lobar	  consolida;on	  	   -­‐	  Rust	  colored	  sputum	  •  H.	  flu	  	   -­...
Specific	  Bugs	  •  Legionella	  	   -­‐	  <	  10%	  of	  CAP,	  higher	  mortality,	  epidemics	  •  Mycoplasma	  	   -­‐...
Specific	  Bugs	  •  Staph	  aureus	  	   -­‐	  Elderly	  	   -­‐	  Post-­‐influenza	  •  CA-­‐MRSA	  	   -­‐	  Necro;zing	 ...
Exposures	  and	  Bugs                                      	  •  Bats	  –	  Histoplasma	  capsulatum	  •  Birds	  –	  C.	...
HIV	  Pa;ents                                    	  •  TB	  •  P.	  jiroveci	  •  Cryptococcus	  •  CMV	  •  ‘Usual’	  typ...
Aspira;on	  •  CVA	  	  •  Esophageal	  disorders	  •  Swallowing	  problems	  •  Neuromuscular	  disease	  •  Drug/alcoho...
CA-­‐MRSA	  Risk	  Factors                                        	  •  Contact	  sports	  •  IVDA	  •  Prisoners	  •  Liv...
Diagnosis	  –	  Signs/Sx’s	  •  Fever	  •  Cough	  •  CXR	  Infiltrate	  •  Rales,	  rhonchi,	  bronchial	  BS,	  egophony	...
Diagnosis                                    	  •  No	  set	  of	  clinical	  criteria	  have	  great	  sensi;vity	  •  Mu...
Diagnosis	  -­‐	  CXR	  •  Lobar	  infiltrate	  –	  typical	  bacteria	  •  Inters;;al	  –	  viral	  or	  PCP	  •  Nodular	...
•  Table	  4.	  	  	  Criteria	  for	  severe	  community-­‐acquired	  pneumonia.	  •  Minor	  criteriaa	  	     	     Res...
Micro	  Tes;ng	  •  Up	  to	  70%	  of	  cases	  never	  have	  iden;fied	  bug	  •  Out-­‐pa;ents	  –	  no	  specific	  tes...
Blood	  Cultures                                      	  •  Only	  +	  in	  ~	  15%	  of	  pneumonia	  pa;ents	  •  Majori...
Sputum	  Cultures                                     	  •  Rate	  of	  +	  cultures	  highly	  variable	  (10-­‐80%)	  • ...
Urinary	  An;gen	  Tes;ng	  •  Bejer	  accuracy	  vs.	  sputum	  &	  blood	  tes;ng	  •  Easier	  to	  obtain	  vs.	  sput...
Severity	  Assessment	  -­‐	  PSI	   •  Derived	  from	  14K	  pa;ents	  with	  CAP	   •  Validated	  in	  40K	  pa;ents	 ...
PSI	  •      Demographics	  	     -­‐	  Age	  (years)	  	     -­‐	  Gender	  (-­‐10	  for	  women)	  	     -­‐	  Nursing	 ...
PSI	  •  Exam	  	   -­‐	  Altered	  MS	  (20)	  	   -­‐	  RR	  >	  30	  (20)	  	   -­‐	  HR	  >	  125	  (10)	  	   -­‐	  S...
PSI	  •  Labs/CXR	  	   -­‐	  pH	  <	  7.35	  	  (30)	  	   -­‐	  Sodium	  <	  130	  	  (20)	  	   -­‐	  Hct	  <	  30	  	 ...
PSI	  -­‐	  Mortality	  •  Class	  I	  –	  0.1-­‐0.4%	  (no	  predictors)	  •  Class	  II	  –	  0.6-­‐0.7%	  (<	  70	  poi...
PSI	  -­‐	  U;lity	  •  Performs	  well	  at	  mortality	  predic;on	  •  Unable	  to	  consistently	  predict	  need	  fo...
CURB-­‐65	  (BTS)	  •  Confusion	  •  Uremia	  (BUN	  >	  20)	  •  RR	  ≥	  30	  •  BP	  –	  SBP	  <	  90	  or	  DBP	  <	 ...
CURB-­‐65	  •  Get	  1	  point	  for	  each	  of	  5	  items	  •  0	  –	  0.7%	  mortality	  •  1	  –	  1.7%	  mortality	 ...
CURB-­‐65	  •  0-­‐1	  –	  treat	  as	  out-­‐pa;ent	  •  2	  –	  brief	  observa;on	  admit	  •  3	  or	  more	  –	  admi...
ATS/IDSA	  •  Table	  4.	  	  	  Criteria	  for	  severe	  community-­‐acquired	  pneumonia.	  •  Minor	  criteria	  	    ...
SMART-­‐COP	  •    Tool	  to	  predict	  need	  for	  vasopressors/MV	  •    Based	  on	  study	  of	  882	  pa;ents	  •  ...
SMART-­‐COP	  •  Hypotension,	  hypoxia	  &	  low	  pH	  each	  2	  points	  •  All	  others	  1	  point	  each	  •  92	  ...
Biomarkers	  –	  Procalcitonin	  (PCT)	  •  Levels	  rise	  during	  infec;on	  	   -­‐	  ?	  More	  specific	  to	  bacter...
PCT	  Guided	  Abx	  Therapy	  •  302	  CAP	  pa;ents,	  randomized,	  open	  trial	  •  Control	  pa;ents	  –	  usual	  p...
Other	  Biomarkers	  of	  Interest	  •  CRP	  	   -­‐	  ?	  Par;cular	  sugges;ve	  of	  pneumococcus	  •  Pro-­‐atrial	  ...
ATS/IDSA	  Summary	  Site	  of	  Care	  •  Consider	  CURB-­‐65	  or	  PSI	  to	  guide	  tx	  loca;on	  	   -­‐	  CURB-­‐...
ATS/IDSA	  Summary	  –	  Outpt	  Treatment	  •  No	  significant	  co-­‐morbidi;es	  	   -­‐	  Macrolide	  (Level	  1)	  	 ...
ATS/IDSA	  Summary	  –	  Inpt	  Treatment	  •  Non-­‐	  ICU	  	   -­‐	  Respiratory	  quinolone	  	   -­‐	  β-­‐lactam	  +...
ATS/IDSA	  Summary	  –	  Abx	  Issues	  •  Time	  to	  1st	  Dose	  	   -­‐	  Did	  not	  specify	  exact	  ;me,	  but	  	...
ATS/IDSA	  Summary	  –	  Abx	  Dura;on	  •  At	  least	  5	  days	  of	  effec;ve	  therapy	  	  •  Afebrile	  for	  at	  l...
Table	  10.	  	  	  Criteria	  for	  clinical	  stability	  •  Temperature	  <=37.8°C	  •  Heart	  rate	  <=100	  beats/mi...
Clinical	  Stability	  •  Hospitalized	  pa;ents	  take	  2-­‐4	  days	  to	  achieve	     stability	  •  May	  be	  longe...
Treatment	  Failure	  •  Lack	  of	  improvement	  or	  clinical	  deteriora;on	  •  Occurs	  in	  up	  to	  15%	  of	  ca...
PaAerns	  and	  e0ologies	  of	  types	  of	                    failure	  to	  respond	  Deteriora;on	  or	  progression	 ...
PaAerns	  and	  e0ologies	  of	  types	  of	               failure	  to	  respond.	  •      Failure	  to	  improve	  	  	 ...
Risk	  Factors	  for	  Lack	  of	  Response	  •  Mul;-­‐lobar	  pneumonia	  •  High	  PSI	  •  Cavity	  or	  effusion	  •  ...
Evalua;on	  of	  Non-­‐responders                                       	  •  Repeat	  cultures	  •  Chest	  CT	  •  Invas...
CAP	  Mortality	  in	  US	  •  ~	  1%	  in	  out-­‐pa;ents	  •  ~	  5-­‐10%	  in	  ward	  pa;ents	  •  Up	  to	  1/3	  of	...
CAP	  Mortality	  •  >	  in	  resistant	  GNR	  and	  Staph	  •  Intermediate	  in	  Strep,	  	  influenza	  •  Lowest	  in...
CAP	  Outcomes	  •  1,555	  pa;ents	  in	  study	  of	  pna	  outcomes	  •  Both	  in-­‐pa;ents	  and	  out-­‐pa;ents	  in...
CAP	  Outcomes	  •  170	  Pa;ents	  with	  pneumococcal	  pneumonia	  •  Assessed	  incidence	  of	  	   -­‐	  Acute	  MI	...
CAP	  &	  Steroids	  •  46	  pa;ent	  RCT	  in	  severe	  CAP	  •  Hydrocor;sone	  200	  mg	  bolus	  then	  10mg/hr	     ...
CAP	  &	  Steroids	  •  213	  pa;ents	  hospitalized	  with	  CAP	  •  Randomized	  to	  prednisone	  40	  for	  7	  d	  •...
Viral	  Pneumonia	  •  More	  common	  in	  children	  •  Likely	  underdiagnosed	  historically	  •  Diagnos;c	  op;ons	 ...
Viral	  Pneumonia	  -­‐	  Diagnosis                                            	  •  Nasal	  swabs,	  aspirates,	  washes	...
Viral	  Pneumonia	  -­‐	  Diagnosis                                             	  •  Signs	  &	  symptoms	  overlap	  wit...
Viruses                               	  •  RSV	  •  Influenza	  •  Parainfluenza	  •  Human	  metapneumo	  virus	  •  Coron...
An;-­‐virals                                  	  •  Neurominidase	  inhibitors	  –	  Influenza	  viruses	  	   -­‐	  Oselta...
Health	  Care-­‐Associated	  Pneumonia	                      (HCAP) 	  •  Nursing	  home	  residents	  •  Recent	  hospita...
Hospital-­‐Acquired	  Pneumonia	  (HAP)                                          	  •  Develops	  ≥	  48	  hours	  a@er	  ...
Ven;lator-­‐Associated	  Pneumonia	                     (VAP)	  •  Develops	  >	  48	  hours	  a@er	  intuba;on	  •  Not	 ...
MDR	  Organisms                                     	  •  Resistant	  to	  ≥	  2	  an;bio;cs	  usually	  used	  to	       ...
Treatment                                     	  •  General	  Principles	  	   -­‐	  Start	  empiric	  an;bio;cs	  promptl...
Importance	  of	  Timing	  of	  Abx                                              	  •  Observa;onal	  study	  of	  107	  c...
Importance	  of	  Appropriate	  Abx                                         	  •  Retrospec;ve	  study	  of	  431	  HCAP	 ...
Treatment	  Guidelines                                     	  •  303	  pa;ents	  in	  4	  ICU’s	  •  129	  had	  guideline...
Dura;on	  of	  An;bio;cs                                      	  •  Prospec;ve	  RCT	  of	  401	  pa;ent	  with	  VAP	  • ...
Pneumonia Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation
Pneumonia Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Pneumonia Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation

1,031 views

Published on

Pneumonia Symposia presented at Hôpital Sacré Coeur in Milot, Haiti, 2011.

CRUDEM’s Education Committee (a subcommittee of the Board of Directors) sponsors one-week medical symposia on specific medical topics, i.e. diabetes, infectious disease. The classes are held at Hôpital Sacré Coeur and doctors and nurses come from all over Haiti to attend.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,031
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
67
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pneumonia Symposia - The CRUDEM Foundation

  1. 1. Pneumonia   Greg  Schumaker,  MD   Assistant  Professor  Pulmonary,  Cri;cal  Care  &  Sleep  Medicine   Tu@s  Medical  Center  
  2. 2. Overview  •  Diagnosis  •  Epidemiology  /Microbiology  •  Triage/Severity  Scoring  •  Treatment  •  Special  Popula;ons/Bugs  •  Summary  of  ATS/IDSA  Guidelines  •  Nosocomial  pneumonias  
  3. 3. Types  of  Pneumonia  •  Community-­‐acquired     -­‐  Present  on  admit  or  within  1st  48  hours     -­‐  No  risk  for  nosocomial  pathogens  •  Healthcare-­‐associated  (HCAP)     -­‐  pa;ents  with  extensive  exposure  to  healthcare   system  prior  to  admit  •  Hospital-­‐acquired  (HAP)     -­‐  develops  ≥  48  hours  post  admit  •  Ven;lator-­‐associated  (VAP)     -­‐  Develops  ≥  48  hours  post  intuba;on  
  4. 4. Epidemiology  •  450  million  cases  worldwide  •  4  million  deaths  per  year  •  Highest  risk  in  children  <  5  and  adults  over  75  •  1.4  million  children  under  5  died  in  2010     -­‐  18%  of  deaths     -­‐  More  than  TB,  HIV  &  malaria  combined     -­‐  Most  of  those  deaths  in  developing  countries     -­‐  Major  risks  are  malnutri;on  and  poverty   WHO and Ruuskanen, O, et al. Lancet, 2011.
  5. 5. Preven;on  •  Vaccina;on     -­‐  Hib,  pertussis,  measles,  pneumococcus     -­‐  up  to  30%  reduc;on  in  incidence  •  Nutri;on  •  Breas^eeding  1st  six  months     -­‐  up  to  15%  reduc;on  in  incidence  •  Prompt  access  to  treatment  •  Reduce  indoor  air  pollu;on   WHO, 2011.
  6. 6. Epidemiology  •  Common  cause  of  sepsis  •  7th  leading  cause  of  death  •  5-­‐6  million  pa;ents/year  •  Mortality  not  significantly  improved  for  years  •  ~  $10B  per  year  spent  •  Over  1  million  cases  per  year  
  7. 7. Microbiology  •  S.  pneumo  remains  most  common    bacteria  •  Influenza  most  common  virus     -­‐  RSV,  metapneumo,  parainfluenza,  adeno  •  Mycobacteria  •  Fungi  
  8. 8. Microbiology  -­‐  Bacteria  •  Typical     -­‐  S.  pneumo     -­‐  H.  influenza     -­‐  Moraxella     -­‐  Staph  a.     -­‐  Aerobic  gram  nega;ve      
  9. 9. Microbiology  -­‐  Bacteria  •  Atypical  Bacteria     -­‐  Legionella     -­‐  Mycoplasma     -­‐  Chlamydia      
  10. 10. •  Table  6.      Most  common  e0ologies  of  community-­‐acquired   pneumonia.     Pa;ent  type     E;ology     Outpa;ent     Streptococcus  pneumoniae             Mycoplasma  pneumoniae             Haemophilus  influenzae           Chlamydophila  pneumoniae             Respiratory  viruses     Inpa;ent  (non-­‐ICU)   S.  pneumoniae            Respiratory  viruses           M.  pneumoniae             C.  pneumoniae             H.  influenzae             Legionella  species             Aspira;on              
  11. 11. Table  6.      Most  common  e0ologies  of  community-­‐ acquired  pneumonia.  Pa;ent  type     E;ology  Inpa;ent  (ICU)     S.  pneumoniae             Staphylococcus  aureus                   Gram-­‐nega;ve  bacilli               H.  influenzae  
  12. 12. Specific  Bugs  •  S.  pneumo     -­‐  Lobar  consolida;on     -­‐  Rust  colored  sputum  •  H.  flu     -­‐  elderly  or  underlying  lung  disease  
  13. 13. Specific  Bugs  •  Legionella     -­‐  <  10%  of  CAP,  higher  mortality,  epidemics  •  Mycoplasma     -­‐  Children,  young  adults  &    elderly  •  Chlamydia     -­‐  Older  adults  •  Influenza          
  14. 14. Specific  Bugs  •  Staph  aureus     -­‐  Elderly     -­‐  Post-­‐influenza  •  CA-­‐MRSA     -­‐  Necro;zing  pna  in  healthy  young  pt     -­‐  Shock     -­‐  Neutropenia     -­‐  Panton-­‐Valen;ne  Leukocidin     -­‐  Usually  suscep;ble  to  Bactrim,  Clinda,  Rifampin  
  15. 15. Exposures  and  Bugs  •  Bats  –  Histoplasma  capsulatum  •  Birds  –  C.  psijaci,  Cryptococcus,  Histoplasma  •  Farm  animals  –  Coxiella  burne;  (Q  fever)   Niederman, Ther Adv Respir Dis, 2011.
  16. 16. HIV  Pa;ents  •  TB  •  P.  jiroveci  •  Cryptococcus  •  CMV  •  ‘Usual’  typical  and  atypical  agents  
  17. 17. Aspira;on  •  CVA    •  Esophageal  disorders  •  Swallowing  problems  •  Neuromuscular  disease  •  Drug/alcohol  abuse  •  Anaerobes/Gram  Nega;ve  Rods  
  18. 18. CA-­‐MRSA  Risk  Factors  •  Contact  sports  •  IVDA  •  Prisoners  •  Living  in  crowded  condi;ons  •  MSM  
  19. 19. Diagnosis  –  Signs/Sx’s  •  Fever  •  Cough  •  CXR  Infiltrate  •  Rales,  rhonchi,  bronchial  BS,  egophony  •  Altered  MS  •  GI  sx’s  •  Leukocytosis  •  ↑  HR  and  RR  •  Chest  retrac;on  in  kids  
  20. 20. Diagnosis  •  No  set  of  clinical  criteria  have  great  sensi;vity  •  Must  have  infiltrate  on  CXR  •  Sputum  and  CXR  pajerns  not  consistent  
  21. 21. Diagnosis  -­‐  CXR  •  Lobar  infiltrate  –  typical  bacteria  •  Inters;;al  –  viral  or  PCP  •  Nodular  –  fungal,  mycobacteria,  nocardia,   ac;no  
  22. 22. •  Table  4.      Criteria  for  severe  community-­‐acquired  pneumonia.  •  Minor  criteriaa       Respiratory  rateb  >=30  breaths/min       Pa02/Fi02  ra;ob  <=250       Mul;lobar  infiltrates       Confusion/disorienta;on       Uremia  (BUN  level,  >=20  mg/dL)       Leukopeniac  (WBC  count,  <4000  cells/mm3)       Thrombocytopenia  (platelet  count,  <100,000  cells/mm3)       Hypothermia  (core  temperature,  <36°C)       Hypotension  requiring  aggressive  fluid  resuscita;on    •  Major  criteria       Invasive  mechanical  ven;la;on       Sep;c  shock  with  the  need  for  vasopressors  
  23. 23. Micro  Tes;ng  •  Up  to  70%  of  cases  never  have  iden;fied  bug  •  Out-­‐pa;ents  –  no  specific  tes;ng  needed  •  Floor  Pa;ents  –  targeted  tes;ng  •  ICU  Pa;ents:     -­‐  Blood  Cultures     -­‐  Sputum  Cultures     -­‐  Urine  an;gen  tes;ng  (Legionella,  Pneumo)     -­‐  Tes;ng  may  improve  mortality  in  this  group  
  24. 24. Blood  Cultures  •  Only  +  in  ~  15%  of  pneumonia  pa;ents  •  Majority  of  +  cultures  are  strep  pneumo  •  ATS/IDSA  recommend  cultures  in:     -­‐  ICU  pa;ents     -­‐  Cavity  on  CXR     -­‐  Leukopenia     -­‐  Chronic  liver  disease  or  EtOH  abuse     -­‐  Asplenia     -­‐  Pleural  Effusion  
  25. 25. Sputum  Cultures  •  Rate  of  +  cultures  highly  variable  (10-­‐80%)  •  ATS/IDSA  guidelines:     -­‐  ICU  Pa;ents     -­‐  Failure  of  empiric  therapy     -­‐  Cavity  on  CXR     -­‐  Alcohol  abuse  or  immunocompromise     -­‐  Severe  lung  disease     -­‐  Pleural  effusion  
  26. 26. Urinary  An;gen  Tes;ng  •  Bejer  accuracy  vs.  sputum  &  blood  tes;ng  •  Easier  to  obtain  vs.  sputum  •  Fast  turn  around  •  Not  affected  by  abx  treatment  up  to  3  days  •  Cannot  do  sensi;vity  tes;ng  •  Legionella  test  only  for  Group  1  (~  80%  of  dz)  •  ?  Lower  accuracy  in  absence  of  bacteremia  
  27. 27. Severity  Assessment  -­‐  PSI   •  Derived  from  14K  pa;ents  with  CAP   •  Validated  in  40K  pa;ents  with  CAP   •  Designed  to  predict  mortality   •  Excluded  immunosuppression   •  20  variables   •  2  step  process   •  Complexity  limits  use  Fine,  MJ,  et  al.    NEJM,  1997.  
  28. 28. PSI  •  Demographics     -­‐  Age  (years)     -­‐  Gender  (-­‐10  for  women)     -­‐  Nursing  home  (10)  •  Co-­‐morbidi;es     -­‐  Malignancy  (30)     -­‐  Neuro  (10)     -­‐  CHF  (10)     -­‐  CKD  (10)     -­‐  ESLD  (20)  
  29. 29. PSI  •  Exam     -­‐  Altered  MS  (20)     -­‐  RR  >  30  (20)     -­‐  HR  >  125  (10)     -­‐  SBP  <90  (20)     -­‐  Temp  <  35⁰  or  >  40⁰  (15)  
  30. 30. PSI  •  Labs/CXR     -­‐  pH  <  7.35    (30)     -­‐  Sodium  <  130    (20)     -­‐  Hct  <  30    (10)     -­‐  BUN  >  30    (20)     -­‐  PaO2  <  60    (10)     -­‐  Glucose  >  250    (10)     -­‐  Pleural  Effusion    (10)  
  31. 31. PSI  -­‐  Mortality  •  Class  I  –  0.1-­‐0.4%  (no  predictors)  •  Class  II  –  0.6-­‐0.7%  (<  70  points)  •  Class  III  –  0.9-­‐2.8%  (70-­‐90)  •  Class  IV  –  4-­‐10%    (90-­‐130)  •  Class  V  –  27%    (>130)  
  32. 32. PSI  -­‐  U;lity  •  Performs  well  at  mortality  predic;on  •  Unable  to  consistently  predict  need  for  ICU  •  Mixed  success  at  guiding  out-­‐pt  vs.  in-­‐pa;ent     -­‐  Class  I-­‐III  poten;al  out-­‐pa;ent  therapy         shown  in  some  ED  studies     -­‐  In  studies  using  PSI,  up  to  30-­‐60%  of  low   risk     pts  were  s;ll  admijed   Singanayagam,  A  ,et  al.    Q  J  Med,  2009.   Niederman,  M,  Respirology,  2009.  
  33. 33. CURB-­‐65  (BTS)  •  Confusion  •  Uremia  (BUN  >  20)  •  RR  ≥  30  •  BP  –  SBP  <  90  or  DBP  <  60  •  65  or  older  •  CRB-­‐65  excludes  BUN     Lim,  WS,  et  al.    Thorax,  2003.  
  34. 34. CURB-­‐65  •  Get  1  point  for  each  of  5  items  •  0  –  0.7%  mortality  •  1  –  1.7%  mortality  •  2  –  8.3%  mortality  •  3  –  17%  mortality  •  4  –  41%  mortality  •  5  –  57%  mortality  
  35. 35. CURB-­‐65  •  0-­‐1  –  treat  as  out-­‐pa;ent  •  2  –  brief  observa;on  admit  •  3  or  more  –  admit,  assess  for  ICU  
  36. 36. ATS/IDSA  •  Table  4.      Criteria  for  severe  community-­‐acquired  pneumonia.  •  Minor  criteria       Respiratory  rate  >=30  breaths/min       Pa02/Fi02  ra;o  <=250       Mul;lobar  infiltrates       Confusion/disorienta;on       Uremia  (BUN  level,  >=20  mg/dL)       Leukopeniac  (WBC  count,  <4000  cells/mm3)       Thrombocytopenia  (platelet  count,  <100,000  cells/mm3)       Hypothermia  (core  temperature,  <36°C)       Hypotension  requiring  aggressive  fluid  resuscita;on    •  Major  criteria       Invasive  mechanical  ven;la;on       Sep;c  shock  with  the  need  for  vasopressors  
  37. 37. SMART-­‐COP  •  Tool  to  predict  need  for  vasopressors/MV  •  Based  on  study  of  882  pa;ents  •  SBP  <  90  •  Mul;lobar  infiltrates  •  Albumin  <3.5  •  RR  >  25  or  30  (depending  upon  age)  •  Tachycardia  >  125  •  Confusion  •  Oxygen  reduced  •  pH  <  7.35  Charles,  PC,  et  al.,  Clin  Infect  Dis,  2008.  
  38. 38. SMART-­‐COP  •  Hypotension,  hypoxia  &  low  pH  each  2  points  •  All  others  1  point  each  •  92  %  of  pa;ents  requiring  ICU  care  had  ≥  3   points    •  Less  accurate  in  pa;ents  <  50    
  39. 39. Biomarkers  –  Procalcitonin  (PCT)  •  Levels  rise  during  infec;on     -­‐  ?  More  specific  to  bacterial  infec;on     -­‐  ?  More  specific  to  infec;on  that  CRP  •  Low  PCT    high  NPPV  (98.9%)  for  mortality  from   CAP     -­‐  even  in  pa;ents  with  high  CRB-­‐65  •  High  PCT,  and  failure  to  drop,  a/w  ↑  mortality  •  High  PCT  a/w  blood  culture  +  Kruger,  S,  et  al.,  Eur  Resp  J,  2008.  
  40. 40. PCT  Guided  Abx  Therapy  •  302  CAP  pa;ents,  randomized,  open  trial  •  Control  pa;ents  –  usual  prac;ce  •  PCT  group  –  abx  use  encouraged  if  PCT  high,   discouraged  if  PCT  low     -­‐  PCT  done  Day  1,  4,  6  and  8  •  PCT  group  had  much  less  abx  use     -­‐  mostly  via  shorter  courses  of  abx  in  PCT  pts  •  Similar  need  for  ICU,  mortality,  etc  Christ-­‐Crain,  M,  et  al.  AJRCCM,  2006.  
  41. 41. Other  Biomarkers  of  Interest  •  CRP     -­‐  ?  Par;cular  sugges;ve  of  pneumococcus  •  Pro-­‐atrial  natriure;c  pep;de  •  Pro-­‐vasopressin  
  42. 42. ATS/IDSA  Summary  Site  of  Care  •  Consider  CURB-­‐65  or  PSI  to  guide  tx  loca;on     -­‐  CURB-­‐65  ≥  2,  in-­‐pa;ent  •  ICU  if  ≥  3  minor  criteria  of  ATS  criteria  Diagnos;c  Tes;ng  •  Must  have  infiltrate  on  CXR  •  Diagnos;c  tes;ng  op;onal  for  outpa;ents  
  43. 43. ATS/IDSA  Summary  –  Outpt  Treatment  •  No  significant  co-­‐morbidi;es     -­‐  Macrolide  (Level  1)     -­‐  Doxycycline  (Level  3)    •  Major  co-­‐morbidi;es     -­‐  Respiratory  quinolone  (Level  1)     -­‐  β-­‐lactam  +  macrolide  •  Cochrane  Review  (2009)  –  current  evidence   insufficient  for  abx  choice  in  out-­‐pt  CAP  
  44. 44. ATS/IDSA  Summary  –  Inpt  Treatment  •  Non-­‐  ICU     -­‐  Respiratory  quinolone     -­‐  β-­‐lactam  +  macrolide  •  ICU     -­‐  β-­‐lactam  +  either  an  IV  macrolide  or     respiratory  quinolone     -­‐  Assess  for  Pseudomonas  &  CA  MRSA  
  45. 45. ATS/IDSA  Summary  –  Abx  Issues  •  Time  to  1st  Dose     -­‐  Did  not  specify  exact  ;me,  but       -­‐  1st  dose  should  be  given  in  ED  •  Switch  IV  to  Oral     -­‐  Hemodynamically  stable     -­‐  Clinically  improving     -­‐  Able  to  take  PO  with  normal  GI  func;on  
  46. 46. ATS/IDSA  Summary  –  Abx  Dura;on  •  At  least  5  days  of  effec;ve  therapy    •  Afebrile  for  at  least  48  hours  •  At  most  fail  1  criteria  of  clinical  stability  •  Longer  dura;on  if:     -­‐  Ini;al  abx  not  effec;ve  against  pathogen     -­‐  Resistant  organism     -­‐  Extrapulmonary  infec;on     -­‐  Immunosuppressed  host  
  47. 47. Table  10.      Criteria  for  clinical  stability  •  Temperature  <=37.8°C  •  Heart  rate  <=100  beats/min  •  Respiratory  rate  <=24  breaths/min  •  Systolic  blood  pressure  >=90  mm  Hg  •  Arterial  oxygen  satura;on  >=90%  or  pO2  >=60   mm  Hg  on  room  air  •  Ability  to  maintain  oral  intakea  •  Normal  mental  statusa  
  48. 48. Clinical  Stability  •  Hospitalized  pa;ents  take  2-­‐4  days  to  achieve   stability  •  May  be  longer  with  lobar  or  necro;zing  pna  •  Can  take  up  to  1  month  for  all  symptoms  to   resolve  •  Can  take  up  to  3  months  for  CXR    to  clear  
  49. 49. Treatment  Failure  •  Lack  of  improvement  or  clinical  deteriora;on  •  Occurs  in  up  to  15%  of  cases  •  Early  –  worsening  in  first  72  hours  •  Late  -­‐  ≥  72  hours  of  therapy  
  50. 50. PaAerns  and  e0ologies  of  types  of   failure  to  respond  Deteriora;on  or  progression       Early  (<72  h  of  treatment)         Severity  of  illness  at  presenta;on         Resistant  microorganism                Uncovered  pathogen                Inappropriate  by  sensi;vity         Metasta;c  infec;on                Empyema/parapneumonic                Endocardi;s,  meningi;s,  arthri;s         Inaccurate  diagnosis                PE,  aspira;on,  ARDS,  Vasculi;s  (e.g.,  SLE)     Delayed                Nosocomial  superinfec;on       Nosocomial  pneumonia       Extrapulmonary                Exacerba;on  of  comorbid  illness                Intercurrent  noninfec;ous  disease       PE       Myocardial  infarc;on       Renal  failure  
  51. 51. PaAerns  and  e0ologies  of  types  of   failure  to  respond.  •  Failure  to  improve       -­‐  Early  (<72  h  of  treatment)       Normal  response       -­‐  Delayed         Resistant  microorganism         Uncovered  pathogen         Inappropriate  by  sensi;vity         Parapneumonic  effusion/empyema         Nosocomial  superinfec;on         Nosocomial  pneumonia         Extrapulmonary       Noninfec;ous         Complica;on  of  pneumonia  (e.g.,  BOOP)         Misdiagnosis:  PE.  CHF,  vasculi;s         Drug  fever    
  52. 52. Risk  Factors  for  Lack  of  Response  •  Mul;-­‐lobar  pneumonia  •  High  PSI  •  Cavity  or  effusion  •  Leukopenia  •  Liver  disease  
  53. 53. Evalua;on  of  Non-­‐responders  •  Repeat  cultures  •  Chest  CT  •  Invasive  tes;ng     -­‐  Bronch     -­‐  Thoracentesis     -­‐  Lung  biopsy  •  Reassess  pre-­‐hospital  exposure  risks  
  54. 54. CAP  Mortality  in  US  •  ~  1%  in  out-­‐pa;ents  •  ~  5-­‐10%  in  ward  pa;ents  •  Up  to  1/3  of  ICU  pa;ents  •  Higher  mortality  in  non-­‐responders  •  Higher  mortality  in  pa;ents  with  concomitant   acute  cardiac  event  
  55. 55. CAP  Mortality  •  >  in  resistant  GNR  and  Staph  •  Intermediate  in  Strep,    influenza  •  Lowest  in  mycoplasma  
  56. 56. CAP  Outcomes  •  1,555  pa;ents  in  study  of  pna  outcomes  •  Both  in-­‐pa;ents  and  out-­‐pa;ents  included  •  8.7%  died  within  90  days  •  29%  died  within  1st  year,  19%  died  in  2nd  year     16%  died  in  year  3  •  Outcome  compared  to  age  matched  controls  •  Mortality  higher  in  pna  pts  across  all  age   groups  Mortensen,  EM,  et  al.,  Clin  Inf  Dis,  2003.  
  57. 57. CAP  Outcomes  •  170  Pa;ents  with  pneumococcal  pneumonia  •  Assessed  incidence  of     -­‐  Acute  MI     -­‐  Afib  or  VT     -­‐  New  or  worsening  CHF  •  33  (19%)    had  ≥  1  cardiac  event     -­‐  12  MI     -­‐  13  CHF     -­‐      8  arrhythmia  Musher,  DM,  et  al.,  Clin  Inf  Dis,  2007.  
  58. 58. CAP  &  Steroids  •  46  pa;ent  RCT  in  severe  CAP  •  Hydrocor;sone  200  mg  bolus  then  10mg/hr   for  7  days  •  1⁰  end-­‐point:    improvement  in  P/F,  MODS  and   development  of  sep;c  shock  by  Day  8  •  2⁰  end-­‐point:    dura;on  MV,  LOS,  mortality    •  All  1⁰  end-­‐points  bejer  in  tx  group  •  2⁰  end-­‐points  also  bejer   Confalonieri,  M,  et  al.    AJRCCM,  2005.  
  59. 59. CAP  &  Steroids  •  213  pa;ents  hospitalized  with  CAP  •  Randomized  to  prednisone  40  for  7  d  •  1⁰  outcome:    cure  at  7  d  •  2⁰  outcome:    cure  at  30d,  LOS,  ;me  to  stability        defervesence,  CRP  •  Results  –  No  difference,  even  in  subset  with   severe  pna     -­‐More  late  failure  with  prednisone  
  60. 60. Viral  Pneumonia  •  More  common  in  children  •  Likely  underdiagnosed  historically  •  Diagnos;c  op;ons  are  improving  •  O@en  co-­‐exists  with  bacterial  pneumonia  •  Limited  treatment  op;ons  •  Seasonal  pajerns  •  Can  have  epidemics   Ruuskanen, O, et al. Lancet, 2011.
  61. 61. Viral  Pneumonia  -­‐  Diagnosis  •  Nasal  swabs,  aspirates,  washes  •  Throat  swab  •  Expectorated  or  induced  sputum  •  BAL  •  PCR  techniques  have  increased  yield  
  62. 62. Viral  Pneumonia  -­‐  Diagnosis  •  Signs  &  symptoms  overlap  with  those  of   bacterial  pneumonia  •  Viral  may  have  more  insidious  onset  or  have   prodrome  •  ?  More  likely  to  have  wheeze  •  Consider  if  not  responding  to  an;bio;cs  
  63. 63. Viruses  •  RSV  •  Influenza  •  Parainfluenza  •  Human  metapneumo  virus  •  Coronavirus  (SARS)  •  Avian  influenza  A  (H5N1)     -­‐  60%  fatality  rate  •  Pandemic  influenza  A  (H1N1)  
  64. 64. An;-­‐virals  •  Neurominidase  inhibitors  –  Influenza  viruses     -­‐  Oseltamivir,  peramivir,  zanamivir,     amantadine  and  rimantadine  •  Ribavirin  –  RSV,  human  metapneumo,  para  
  65. 65. Health  Care-­‐Associated  Pneumonia   (HCAP)  •  Nursing  home  residents  •  Recent  hospitaliza;on  •  Chronic  dialysis  •  Home  infusion  therapy  •  Home  wound  care  therapy  
  66. 66. Hospital-­‐Acquired  Pneumonia  (HAP)  •  Develops  ≥  48  hours  a@er  admit  •  Highest  risk  of  HAP  is  in  intubated  pa;ents  •  Es;mated  incidence  4-­‐7/1000  admits  •  Pa;ents  with  HAP  have  20-­‐50%  mortality  
  67. 67. Ven;lator-­‐Associated  Pneumonia   (VAP)  •  Develops  >  48  hours  a@er  intuba;on  •  Not  present  at  ;me  of  intuba;on  •  1-­‐4%  daily  risk  while  intubated  
  68. 68. MDR  Organisms  •  Resistant  to  ≥  2  an;bio;cs  usually  used  to   treat  the  organism  •  Risk  Factors  for  MDR  infec;on:     -­‐  Received  an;bio;cs  in  last  90-­‐180  days     -­‐  Hospitalized  ≥  2  days  in  last  90  days     -­‐  Current  hospitaliza;on  has  been  for  ≥  5  days     -­‐  High  local  incidence  of  MDR  organisms     -­‐  Immunosuppressed  pa;ent  
  69. 69. Treatment  •  General  Principles     -­‐  Start  empiric  an;bio;cs  promptly  based  on     local  an;-­‐biogram     -­‐  Blood  &  Sputum  culture  if  possible     -­‐  Prompt  ini;a;on  of  appropriate  abx  crucial     -­‐  Assess  for  risk  for  MDR  organism     -­‐  Descalate  as  quickly  as  able  (within  72  hours)  
  70. 70. Importance  of  Timing  of  Abx  •  Observa;onal  study  of  107  consecu;ve  VAP   pa;ents  in  single  ICU  •  Compared  pt  with  >  24  hour  delay  in  abx  •  Mortality  in  delay  pa;ents  70%  vs.  28%  •  Even  adjusted  for  severity  of  illness,  etc,  delay     abx  s;ll  led  to  increased  mortality  Iregui M, et al. Chest, 2002.
  71. 71. Importance  of  Appropriate  Abx  •  Retrospec;ve  study  of  431  HCAP  pa;ents  •  Single  center  •  Mortality  in  pa;ents  with  appropriate  regimen   was  18%  vs.  30%  (p  0.013)   Zilberberg, et al. Chest, 2008.
  72. 72. Treatment  Guidelines  •  303  pa;ents  in  4  ICU’s  •  129  had  guideline  recommended  an;bio;cs  •  174  pa;ents  did  not  get  recommended  abx  •  34%  of  adherent  pa;ents  died  vs.  20%  •  Other  studies  have  suggested  opposite  results  •  Emphasizes  the  importance  of  adjus;ng     therapy  to  local  pathogens   Kett, DH, et al. Lancet Infect Dis, 2011.
  73. 73. Dura;on  of  An;bio;cs  •  Prospec;ve  RCT  of  401  pa;ent  with  VAP  •  Excluded  immunosuppressed  pa;ents  •  Compared  8  vs.  15  days  of  an;bio;cs  •  Outcomes:    death,  recurrence  &  abx  free  days  •  No  difference  in  Mortality  or  ICU  days  •  Overall  recurrence  rate  not  different  •  If  GNR,  8d  group  had  higher  recurrence,  but   no  mortality  difference  &  less  resistance  Chastre, et al. JAMA, 2003.

×