Closing remarks dr kim geheb

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3rd Mekong Forum on Water, Food & Energy. Closing remarks for the forum by Dr Kim Geheb, Mekong Basin Leader, CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food

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  • Ladies and Gentlemen, Colleagues and friends.
  • 50 HoaBinh staff constructed the set, which was designed by the Vietnamese Theatre and Drama University
  • Closing remarks dr kim geheb

    1. 1. The CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food in the Mekong What happened? Kim Geheb Basin Leader
    2. 2. Our forums • 2011: 160 • 2012: 193 • 2013: 230
    3. 3. 94 different institutions represented Cambodia: China: Lao PDR: Thailand: Vietnam: International: 32 (17%) 13 (7%) 57 (29%) 27 (14%) 37 (19%) 27 (14%) Government: Universities: Regional NGO: Independent research org.: Government research org.: Consultancy: Other: 27 (14%) 59 (31%) 28 (14%) 27 (14%) 15 (8%) 15 (8%) 21 (11%)
    4. 4. What were we supposed to do? To reduce poverty and foster development by optimizing the use of water in reservoirs
    5. 5. If we were successful… Reservoirs would:  Be managed in ways that are fairer and more equitable to all water users.  Be managed and coordinated across cascades to optimize benefits for all.  Be planned and managed to account for environmental and social needs.  Be used for multiple purposes besides hydropower alone.  Be better governed and the benefits better shared.
    6. 6. How were we supposed to do it? Research Universities, r esearch institutes, biomedical facilities, gene tics etc Solutions Development UN, developm ent NGOs, philant hropic foundations, governments
    7. 7. Communications Leadership Action Research Trust Development Learning Partnerships
    8. 8. 4 years later…  We had implemented 19 projects in China, Lao PDR, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia.  We had awarded 22 small grants.  58 fellows had conducted their research.  We had 73 formal partners and ≈140 informal partners.  We had 7 MOUs or letters of association.  We had implemented three Mekong forums.  We had secured and disbursed US$10.6 million.
    9. 9. Outputs (1)  Emerging evidence that large irrigation benefits can be gained from very modest use of reservoir water.  New strategies for strengthening and diversifying livelihoods in resettled communities.  A field-tested integrated water valuation framework.  Estimation of the total value of water multi-uses in three catchments.  Map of Mekong dams (both HP and other).  State of Knowledge reports.
    10. 10. Outputs (2)  58 Fellowships reports.  The MK3 ‘on-line book’.  A decision-making, two team, game, played within a ‘fictional basin’.  Gender standards and safeguards for hydropower.  Lots of publications, many more in 2013 and 2014.  Many of other outputs, incl. films.  An R4D model and partnership base has attracted widespread attention.
    11. 11. Outcomes (1)  Livelihoods improvement strategies and technologies trialed at THPC and Yali Falls.  Helping Vietnamese dams in Laos address gender and indigenous community aspects of implementation.  Bringing national legislation to local levels.  Sustainable hydropower curricula development.  A new catchment strategy for the Nam Theun – Nam Kading RBC.  HSAP trailing at two major Chinese dams.  Artificial wetlands construction – and WLE interest and uptake.
    12. 12. Outcomes (2)  Reservoir fisheries may be more productive than the dominant narratives suggest.  Draw down zone agricultural solutions at Yali Falls.  Multiple use for small-scale irrigation weirs.  Providing informal fora for China to engage south of the border.  An emerging IWRM MSP in Cambodia.  CPWF dialogues and its forums have created a new way to discuss HP, and associated research.
    13. 13. But most importantly… A dynamic, multi-disciplinary, multi-national, multi-scale research-for-development network that delivers world-class research and generates significant developmental impacts.
    14. 14. Key technical messages (draft) (1)  Relatively modest adjustments to reservoir and dam operation can yield significant multiple use benefits.  There exist many technical applications – particularly agricultural and water-related – that can contribute to livelihoods restoration and enhancement.  Cumulative impact assessment remains a significant challenge for the system as a whole.  Impacts on the system are not all due to HP alone – e.g. fishing pressure, urban pollution etc.
    15. 15. Key technical messages (draft) (2)  Ecological productivity of reservoirs can be improved and increased.  Costs of dams are unevenly distributed - economic feasibility studies fail to account for the true costs of dams.  Governance remains a significant HP challenge, especially at scale.
    16. 16. Funders  AusAID  IFAD  BMZ
    17. 17. Co-hosts  IWRP  M-POWER
    18. 18. Hanoi Event Team  Hoa Binh Tourist
    19. 19. Knowledge reservoir  Mia Signs  Ilse Pukinskis  Bounmee Maokhamphiou  Hoa Bin set construction team  Vietnamese Theatre and Drama University.
    20. 20. Rapporteurs  Marnie MacDonald  Terry Clayton
    21. 21. Sessions  21 Session Leaders  Facilitators  Presenters  Panellists
    22. 22. Forum organisation  Sengsamay Punkeo  Malichanh Srithirath  Tuan Nguyen Van  Pham Thanh Tu  Terry Clayton  Emma Coats  Stew Motta  David Clayton  Sharon Perera
    23. 23. Finally… WE THANK YOU!!!!!

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