Ganges Basin Development Challenge& role of change and coordination project
Ganges- Basin Development ChallengeWhy the Ganges Basin?   • Bangladesh and India rank first and second in terms of   clim...
Geographical setting              Myanmar
Ganges Basin:Ganges Basin Area= 1,087,300 sq. km
Coastal Area of Bangladesh• Population >40 million, 28% of total population• Total area 47,201 km2, ~1000 people/km2
Sea level rise                               Major Challenges in Ganges Coastal Areas      Salinity intrusion             ...
What the Ganges BDC hopes to achieve? Goal is to reduce poverty, improve food security and strengthen livelihood resilienc...
Study  Area: Ganges Dependant Area in BangladeshProject Target Area:Coastal Zone of the Gangesbasin in Bangladesh except t...
Coastal Polders in Bangladesh In the early sixties and seventies, 125 polders (of which 49 are sea-facing) were constructe...
How the Ganges BDC hopes to achieve?Five research projects (G1-5) that will:   •   Provide science-based solutions to agri...
Ganges BDC : 5 Science ProgramsLand Use, Water and Water Governance and Agriculture  systems:• G1. Resource profiles, extr...
G3: Water Governance and Community-Based  Management•   Assess existing water governance and land use systems.•   Determin...
Selection of sub-projects                                     (polders)                                                   ...
G4: Modeling External Drivers of Change for WaterResources of the Coastal Zone • Assess changes in external hydrology (and...
Hydrologic Trend Analysis in the Study Area:Data Collection and Hydrological Analysis; Trend analysis ofGanges River Disch...
Salinity (PPT)             0                 2                      4                           6                         ...
DRIVERS OF CHANGE – IDENTIFIED THROUGH PARTICIPATORY PROCESSDemographic/SocietalPopulation growth, Land use changeEconomi...
G5. Coordination and Change-Enabling Project• Coordination and quality of research: Coordinate and support G 1-4to assure ...
Expected Outputs of coordination project1    Establish Adaptive management system2.   Gender strategy3.   Communication st...
Means of Achievement• Focus on three streams of innovation, integrate them, and  scale up these strategies to a wider rang...
Links across the Projects
Approach to Change Enabling• Identification of agro-ecological zones for targeting improved  technologies and water govern...
Partnerships are key - Scale up/out stakeholders•   Government Agencies… BARC, BRRI, DAE, DoF etc•   NGOs – BRAC, CARE and...
Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project
Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project
Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project
Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project
Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project
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Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project

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  • Epicenter of world climate change- we will be first to feel the effects of climate change- What we do and what we learn – will Polders- might be the future of low-lying communities around the world.
  • Nothing here you have not seen before- What is new arem the steps boru has laid out and global reach of the research- MIRRORS GOV OF INDIA AND BANGLADESH- IN TERMS OF THEIR PRSP’S AS WELL AS THE GOB CIP
  • Relevance to the cip
  • Combine- water, agriculture and fisheries- water governance
  • The water regime of the brackish coastal zone of the Ganges is strongly affected by upstream flows in the Ganges as well as the relentless tidal pressures from the sea. The balance of environmental factors is extremely delicate and complicated; changes in the upstream water and sediment flow regimes (due to water extraction, watershed degradation and/or changes in drainage - natural or manmade) as well as sea level changes will manifest themselves on the water resources of the coastal zone, and therefore on its land use and productivity. Other external drivers of change are also important.Based on the anticipated impacts adaptation strategies will be devised for a range of improvements such as improvement of the land-use patterns, drainage canals, operation of sluices, strengthening of embankments, dredging, restoration of dry season freshwater flow for flushing salinity as well as restoration of the ecosystem.
  • Partners Different from Phase one- lessons form phase one indicated a need to tie the various programs – to achieve the change - Not only good science but combined with cooperation- this program also acts as the interface between the program and a range of exisiting and potential stakeholders.
  • The research program will build on the work of the Bangladesh Water Development Board (BWDB), and partners, on “Integrated Planning for Sustainable Water Management (IPSWAM)”. Special attention will be given to overcoming conflicts between boro rice and upland crops, and between rice and shrimp, through community water management initiatives2nd stream The research program will build on the work of CPWF Phase 1 project PN35 (Bill, what is this?)
  • Partners Different from Phase one- lessons form phase one indicated a need to tie the various programs – to achieve the change - Not only good science but combined with cooperation- this program also acts as the interface between the program and a range of exisiting and potential stakeholders.
  • Partners Different from Phase one- lessons form phase one indicated a need to tie the various programs – to achieve the change - Not only good science but combined with cooperation- this program also acts as the interface between the program and a range of exisiting and potential stakeholders.
  • Ganges Basin Development Project and Role of Change and Coordination Project

    1. 1. Ganges Basin Development Challenge& role of change and coordination project
    2. 2. Ganges- Basin Development ChallengeWhy the Ganges Basin? • Bangladesh and India rank first and second in terms of climate change risk. Poverty, Agricultural Dependence are the basis of South Asian Risk. • The areas of Bangladesh and India most at risk are the coastal- saline zones of Ganges Basin. Lessons learned in our coastal saline areas have application in coastal communities around the world.
    3. 3. Geographical setting Myanmar
    4. 4. Ganges Basin:Ganges Basin Area= 1,087,300 sq. km
    5. 5. Coastal Area of Bangladesh• Population >40 million, 28% of total population• Total area 47,201 km2, ~1000 people/km2
    6. 6. Sea level rise Major Challenges in Ganges Coastal Areas Salinity intrusion Salinity intrusion Salinity Intrusion Increasing soil/surface water salinity Fresh water limitations Severe cyclonic storms Siltation Flood Cyclone Water logging
    7. 7. What the Ganges BDC hopes to achieve? Goal is to reduce poverty, improve food security and strengthen livelihood resilience in coastal areas through improved water governance and management, and more productive and diversified farm system. Objective to improve resource productivity and increase resilience of agriculture and aquaculture systems in brackish water coastal areas of the Ganges
    8. 8. Study Area: Ganges Dependant Area in BangladeshProject Target Area:Coastal Zone of the Gangesbasin in Bangladesh except theSundarbansCoastal Divisions:Barisal:Patuakhali, Barguna, Jhalakati &Pirojpur districtsKhulna:Khulna & Satkhira districts
    9. 9. Coastal Polders in Bangladesh In the early sixties and seventies, 125 polders (of which 49 are sea-facing) were constructed to protect low lying coastal areas from tidal flood & salinity intrusion.
    10. 10. How the Ganges BDC hopes to achieve?Five research projects (G1-5) that will: • Provide science-based solutions to agriculture and water issues of the region • Seek to support Governments of Bangladesh and India and other investments in a range of agriculture programs • Support government policy makers and civil society with the information and skills they need in the areas of water governance and potential impacts of climate change
    11. 11. Ganges BDC : 5 Science ProgramsLand Use, Water and Water Governance and Agriculture systems:• G1. Resource profiles, extrapolation domains (EDA) and land- use plans• G2. Farming Systems : Resilient intensified and diversified agriculture and aquaculture systems• G3. Water governance and community-based management• G4. Modeling Change Assessment of the impact of anticipated external drivers of change on water resources of the coastal zone• G5. Coordination and change-enabling project
    12. 12. G3: Water Governance and Community-Based Management• Assess existing water governance and land use systems.• Determine which governance systems offer the best outcomes for communities and reduce conflict across different users.• How these governance systems best meet the needs of polder communities and the water requirements of different production systems.
    13. 13. Selection of sub-projects (polders) Formation of Water Data Collection and Analysis Management Organisations (WMO) Plan Formulation and FinalisationMonitoring and Rehabilitation WorkPlan review Monitoring and Plan review Long-term Operation and Maintenance Research to understand best approaches to water management in polders
    14. 14. G4: Modeling External Drivers of Change for WaterResources of the Coastal Zone • Assess changes in external hydrology (and other external drivers of change) in the coastal zone of the Ganges at the regional and with selected polders. • Model conditions and effects for salinity intrusion, water availability, drainage congestions and risk of inundation due to storm surges. • Simulate baseline and changed conditions in 2020, 2030 and 2050. At regional level for and at local levels for the selected polders
    15. 15. Hydrologic Trend Analysis in the Study Area:Data Collection and Hydrological Analysis; Trend analysis ofGanges River Discharge 90000 80000 • Increasing trend of annual maximum flow 70000 60000 • Decreasing trend of Discharge (m3/s) annual minimum flow 50000 40000 30000 20000 10000 0 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Max Q Min Q Average Q Linear (Max Q) Linear (Min Q) Linear (Average Q)
    16. 16. Salinity (PPT) 0 2 4 6 8 12 10 Jan/2005 Jan/2005Mar/2005Apr/2005May/2005May/2005Jun/2005 Jul/2005Aug/2005Sep/2005 Noapara GhatOct/2005Nov/2005Dec/2005 Jan/2006Feb/2006Mar/2006Apr/2006May/2006Jun/2006 Fultola Ghat Jul/2006Aug/2006Sep/2006Oct/2006Nov/2006Dec/2006 Jan/2007Feb/2007Mar/2007Apr/2007May/2007 Charerhat GhatJun/2007 Jul/2007Aug/2007Sep/2007Oct/2007Nov/2007Dec/2007 Jan/2008Feb/2008 Rupsha GhatMar/2008Apr/2008May/2008Jun/2008 Jul/2008Aug/2008Sep/2008Oct/2008 MollarhatNov/2008Dec/2008 Jan/2009Feb/2009Mar/2009 Monthly Salinity MonitoringApr/2009May/2009Jun/2009 Salinity Trends Jul/2009Aug/2009Sep/2009Oct/2009 (Data Source: Department of Environment, DOE)
    17. 17. DRIVERS OF CHANGE – IDENTIFIED THROUGH PARTICIPATORY PROCESSDemographic/SocietalPopulation growth, Land use changeEconomic/TradeEconomic develpopment in coastal zone (change in per capita income)Political/Institutional/LegalWater policy (national and regional)Environmental/Climate ChangeSea level rise due to Climate ChangeChanges in precipitation and temperature due to Climate ChangeTechnological/Important InnovationsChanges in aquaculture and agriculture intensification
    18. 18. G5. Coordination and Change-Enabling Project• Coordination and quality of research: Coordinate and support G 1-4to assure quality and relevant science• Fostering change: Participatory impact pathway analysis, M&E topick up on emergent opportunities, outcome/logic models.• Communications: Support achievement of change in target actors andscale up of research results.• Adaptive management: M&E providing information and insight tosupport good adaptive management decisions• Innovation research: Research to find innovative ways to turnresearch into developmental outcomes
    19. 19. Expected Outputs of coordination project1 Establish Adaptive management system2. Gender strategy3. Communication strategy4. Policy products and processes5. Development actors engaged6. Innovation research findings
    20. 20. Means of Achievement• Focus on three streams of innovation, integrate them, and scale up these strategies to a wider range of polder categories and land types – First stream: Water management, water governance and the future of water for agriculture. (G3 and G4) – Second stream: development of institutions for community-based resource management. (G3, G5) – Third stream: farming systems crop management practices for salt-affected lands. (G1, G2).
    21. 21. Links across the Projects
    22. 22. Approach to Change Enabling• Identification of agro-ecological zones for targeting improved technologies and water governance arrangements• Inspiring NARES, NGOs and other out scaling projects to adopt and promote the improved technologies• Influencing policy makers and government at community to national levels to invest in the necessary infrastructure improvements and policy changes
    23. 23. Partnerships are key - Scale up/out stakeholders• Government Agencies… BARC, BRRI, DAE, DoF etc• NGOs – BRAC, CARE and other large NGOs• Private Sector Linkages… seed companies, hatcheries etc• Ongoing Projects and Studies – Bangladesh CIP – Cereal Systems Initiative For South Asia (CSISA) – Global Agriculture Food Security (GAFSP) – Master Plan for the Southern Delta

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