Uk lost and stolen cards 2010

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To explore the risk of identity fraud due to lost or stolen credit cards, CPP commissioned two sets of research. The first was a ‘live’ social experiment that involved dropping 100 wallets in different UK cities see how many were returned to their rightful owner and whether their contents were intact. The results were very interesting….

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Uk lost and stolen cards 2010

  1. 1. UK Lost andStolen CardsA CPP white paperAugust 2010
  2. 2. Contents 2 1.0 Introduction 1.2 Industry Facts 1.3 Research methodology 1.4 Key Findings - An estimated five million wallets have been lost in the past five years and a further four million stolen - In addition to the average £85 cash, people carry over £7,000 in credit in their wallets/purses - Not surprisingly the ‘act’ of being robbed was the most stressful part of the experience - Vast majority of people claim they would either hand in, or try to track down, an owner of a lost wallet/purse - The majority of people never see their lost or stolen wallets/ purses again - The average person will spend over 110 hours – or four and a half days – replacing their personal mementos and debit/credit cards - Card fraud is a common consequence of loss/theft 1.5 Conclusion 1.6 Avoiding Card Fraud 1.7 Further Information 1.8 About CPP UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  3. 3. Introduction 3 1.1 Foreword Fraud continues to be a problem in the UK and is driven in a number of different ways. Online fraud, institutional theft, social engineering scams, card-not-present, ATM and counterfeit fraud, lost and stolen fraud and identity fraud collectively make fraud an issue that can cause untold inconvenience, stress and irritation to many people. We have seen card fraud losses decrease in 2009 predominately driven by a decrease in The results did card-not-present fraud, but whatever the official statistics, it is clear that fraud in any guise remains a problem. Identity fraud has hit the headlines over the last few years and the not paint a consequences do undoubtedly cause misery for those people affected by this increasingly insidious crime. positive picture To explore the issue of risk in more detail, CPP commissioned two sets of research that and showed would compare claimed and actual behaviour. The first piece of research saw CPP conduct a ‘live’ social experiment that dropped 100 wallets throughout cities in the UK;there was a real our intention to see how many were returned to their rightful owner and whether their contents were intact. The second piece of research looked at claimed behaviour andfraud risk with a investigated the issue of lost and stolen wallets/purses in much more detail. The results were interesting and showed an inconsistency between what people claimloss of payment they would do and what happens in the real world. Needless to say, the results did not paint a positive picture and showed that there was a real fraud risk with the loss of cards and cash payment cards and cash. It is clear lost wallets/purses do go astray and whatever people can proactively do to mitigate against their loss and theft will help manage the situation. The value of card protection services is clear when considered against some of the research findings. UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  4. 4. 4 1.2 Industry Facts - Fraud on debit and credit cards fell by more than a quarter in 2009 to £440.3m (source: UK Cards Association) - Fraud on lost and stolen cards totalled £47.9m in 2009 down 11 per cent on the previous year (source: UK Cards Association) - Card-not-present fraud fell 19 per cent in 2009 to £266.4m (source: UK Cards Association) - Counterfeit card fraud (skimming and cloning) fell by over a half to £80.9m in 2009 (source: UK Cards Association) - Online banking fraud losses in 2009 climbed by 14 per cent to £59.7m – these losses were driven by criminals using more sophisticated methods to target online banking customers through malware, which target vulnerabilities in customers’ PCs (source: UK Cards Association) - Cheque fraud fell 29 per cent from £41.9m to £29.8m in 2009 (source: UK Cards Association) - The south east accounted for 53 per cent of fraud in the UK and 38 per cent of fraud in the UK and abroad on UK- issued cards. The north west was the second worst region with figures of 12 per cent and 9 per cent respectively (source: UK Cards Association) - There were over 143.7 million payment cards in issue in the UK at the end of The south east 2009 including 79.3 million debit cards and 58.1 million credit cards and 6.4 million charge cards (source: UK Cards Association) accounted - The average number of cards per person in 2009 was 3.6for 53% of fraud (source: UK Cards Association) - Annually, CPP cancels over a quarter of a million payment cards in the UK that in the UK and have been lost or stolen helping to fight card fraud, particularly face-to-face or retailer fraud and card-not-present fraud. (source: CPP) 38% of fraud in the UK and abroad on UK- issued cards UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  5. 5. 5 1.3 Research Methodology ICM interviewed a random sample of 2,029 adults aged 18+ online between 29 July – 1 August 2010. Surveys were conducted across the country and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules. Further information at www.icmresearch.co.uk The Wallet Dropping Experiment was completed by PCP Research. The procedure for this research involved wallets and purses being dropped at various locations in five UK cities. 20 wallets/purses were dropped per city, meaning a total of 100 were dropped. The ‘drops’ took place at six different types of location; shopping centre, street, public transport, car park, museum and café. Each wallet or purse contained the following; £10 in cash (either two £5 notes or one £5 note and £5 in change), a photograph, tickets, receipts and stamps to add authenticity, and several business cards. Each business card bore a phone number which linked to the research team. When members of the public found the wallet/purse and rang the number, a member of the research team would take the call. During the call they took information about where the wallet/purse had been found, and whether the possessions and money were still intact, and asked for the caller to return the wallet. All members of the public who returned wallets were offered remuneration for their postage costs. The wallets/purses were dropped by trained market research fieldworkers, who took care to ensure that they successfully made the drops without being seen by any members of the public. We wanted to avoid any situations where a member of the public saw us drop the wallet/purse and handed it straight back to us, as we wanted to allow time for someone to find it and make the decision of what to do with it. The research was conducted between 29th June 2010 and 14th July 2010.UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  6. 6. 6 1.4 Key Findings An estimated five million wallets have been lost in the past five years and a further four million stolen The UK adult population according to the Office of National Statistics (ONS) is 49,051,000. According to this research, 10 per cent of people claim they have lost their wallets/purses in the last five years. This therefore equates to 4,905,100 wallets lost in the UK. If we use the same equation we can calculate that there have been just short of 4 million wallets/purses stolen in the last five years (49,051,000 x 8 per cent). When we look at the results demographically men are marginally more inclined to lose their wallets (10 per cent verses 8 per cent) then women, but there is no real bias towards having them stolen. However those aged 18-24 were the most likely to report their wallet/purse lost in the last five years (24%) verses only 5 per cent of those aged 55-64. When we looked at theft, 18-24 year olds were again more likely to have report their wallet/purse stolen in the last five years (14%) with only 5 per cent of people aged 25-64 reporting any form of theft When we looked at city comparisons people in Hull reported the highest proportion of wallets/purses stolen in the last five years. Q: Which of the following, if any, has happened to you in the last...? 79% 75% 80 70 60 50 40 30 14% 20 12% 10 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% 0 Respondants who have lost their wallet/purse Respondants who had their wallet/purse stolen Less than 6 months ago 6-12 months 1-2 years 3-5 years Over 5 years This hasn’t happened to meUK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  7. 7. 7 In addition to the average £85 cash, people carry over £7,000 in credit in their wallets everyday When we questioned people who had been a victim of theft, the average amount of cash carried (and stolen) amounted to £85.23. Those aged 25-34 carried the most money (£114.01) verses those aged 55-64 who carried the least (£64.83). Respondents in Newcastle purported to carry the most cash (£208.12) in stark contrast to people in Southampton who reported carrying only £43.89. Residents in Birmingham and Manchester carried the most money after Newcastle. When we looked at the amount of available credit held by people who had had their wallet/purse stolen the average was £7,401. This credit was held across two credit cards per person. Not surprisingly those aged 45-54 reported holding the most credit (£11,734) verses only £937 for people aged 18-24. There was little variance in available credit between men and women. The research also reported that people held on average 1.32 debit cards with men slightly inclined to carry more debit facilities (1.38 men verses 1.29 women) When we looked into what else was stolen in addition to cash (83%) and debit (61%) and credit cards (47%), people reported losing reward cards (43%), other membership cards i.e. for the gym, library (38%) as well as receipts and stamps (32%), driving licence (28%), personal photos (27%) and store cards (24%). A small minority (10%) lost business and travel cards. Most concerning 2 per cent admitted to carrying their PIN numbers, which would put them at risk of cash machine, retail and card-not-present fraud. The success When we of Chip and PIN in recent years has dramatically reduced these types of fraud, but this looked at the type of secure verification is obviously compromised when a PIN is written down and carried. Consumers also risk liability for any fraud losses as they will not have taken amount of reasonable care.available credit Q: How much cash was in your wallet...?held by people 120who had their 100 wallet/purse 80 stolen £ 60 the average 40 was £7,401 20 Total Mean £85.23 Male £84.92 Female £85.36 0 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ All respondants whose wallet/purse was stolen and had cash in it UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  8. 8. 8 Q: How much credit was in your wallet...? 12000 10000 8000 £ 6000 4000 Mean 2000 Total £7,401 Male £7,547 Female £7,310 0 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ All respondants whose wallet/purse was stolen and had credit in itUK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  9. 9. 9 Not surprisingly the act of being robbed was the most stressful part of the experience When we questioned people about their experience of being robbed, not surprisingly the actual act of being robbed (42%) was considered the most stressful part of the experience. There was little variance between men and women, however, those aged 55+ were more likely to report this as the most stressful part of the experience. With the average wallet/purse containing more than £85 cash and £7,400 in available credit, concerns over fraudulent transactions (37%) and loss of cash (36%) were also high. The process of calling banks to cancel and replace payment cards was also rated as a stressful experience (32%); perhaps because any delay is associated with the probability of fraud occurring. Those aged 24-34 were the most likely to say cancelling payment cards was stressful (39%). Respondents aged 55+ were the most concerned about fraud on their stolen payment cards. The loss of irreplaceable items was considered less stressful with only 17% thinking it merited a mention. Only 1% said the act of theft was not stressful. Q: When you had your wallet/purse stolen, which of the following three best describes what you found the most stressful part of the experience? 50 40 30 20 10 0 All respondants who had their wallet/purse stolenUK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  10. 10. 10 The average person will spend over 110 hours –or four and a half days – replacing their personal mementos and debit/credit cards When we asked respondents to rate the most stressful part of the theft, calling the banks to cancel and reorder payment cards rated just behind the actual act of being robbed, fear of fraud and loss of cash. This could be explained by the fact that any delay in cancelling the cards could result in more fraudulent transactions. However, one consideration for why people say the process of reporting their cards lost/ stolen is so stressful is that it took them, on average, 110.77 hours to replace all the items in their wallet/purse that had gone missing. This includes bank cards, driving licence, membership, store and loyalty cards, national insurance cards, bus passes and other personal information. The value of a card loss cancellation and reporting service is therefore clear; not only to One ensure fraudulent spend is kept to a minimum, but to assist with the quick replacement of other items like passports, membership and store cards and driving licence. consideration why people say the Q: How much time did you approximately spend replacing items in your wallet/purse? process of 120reporting their 100 cards lost/ stolen is so 80 hoursstressful is that 60 it took them, 40 on average, 110 hours to 20 replace all the 0 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ items in their Mean All respondants who had their wallet/purse Total Male Female 110.72 107.27 113.08 wallet/purse stolen UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  11. 11. 11 Vast majority of people claim they would either hand in, or try to track down, an owner of a lost wallet/purse With nine million wallets and purses lost and stolen in the last five years, and nearly 1.5 million in the last six months alone, we thought it interesting to see what happens when they are found. According to the research 94 per cent of people would either take it to a local police station, hand it in to the location it was found i.e. a shop/restaurant, attempt to contact the owner directly or deliver the item to the owner in person. Only 2 per cent say they would keep the content and either discard the item or return it empty. In order to put this claimed honesty to the ‘test’ we conducted a nationwide ‘live’ social experiment that tested people’s honesty. And the results were very different to what people had said via the ICM research. Only two in ten ‘accidentally’ dropped wallets were returned to their rightful owners and only half of those (55%) contained the original sum of money. Of 100 wallets/purses dropped containing a total sum of £1,000, only £120 was returned. Of all the cities investigated in the experiment, Birmingham faired the worse – one in four wallets/purses were returned and all were completely empty. Next came Glasgow, Cardiff and Leeds. Surprisingly London fared better with all those wallets/purses which were returned still containing the original sum of money. The research also revealed that people are far likelier to have their wallet or purse returned if it is lost in a museum as around half (53 per cent) ‘dropped’ in a museum were handed in. Those ‘lost’ in shopping centres also stand a better chance with a third being returned. Consumers eating out or travelling on public transport need to be careful – none of the wallets/purses placed in cafes or on public transport were returned to their owners. What the social experiment shows us is that there is an inconsistency between claimed and actual behaviour and that if you lose your wallet/purse you only have small i.e. 20 per cent chance of seeing it again.UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  12. 12. 12 Q: If you found someone else’s wallet/purse, what would you do? 35 33% 31% 30 22% 20 10 8% 5 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 0 65+ All respondants who have founde someone else’s wallet/purse3 Mean Took it to the local police station Handed it in to staff at the location it was found i.e shop manager Attempted to contact the owner directly to arrange for them to collect item/send it to them Delivered the item to owner’s address in person Kept cash/credit cards and kept or discarded item Kept cash/credit cards and returned item Left it where I found it Other Don’t know ICM ‘live’ social experience City Number of Proportion Number of Proportion Total wallets reported wallets containing amount of reported (from a total reported money money of 20) containing (from a total reported money of 20) Birmingham 5 25% 0 0% £0 Cardiff 4 20% 3 15% £30 Glasgow 4 20% 2 10% £20 Leeds 5 25% 3 15% £30 London 4 20% 4 20% £40 Total 22 22% (total 12 12% (total £120 100) 100) UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  13. 13. 13 The majority of people never see their lost or stolen wallets/purses again Consistent with the findings of the social experiment, the vast majority (77%) of people who had their wallet lost/stolen did not have it returned to them. There was marginal variance between age groups and gender, but no real trend. Regionally people in Norwich, Southampton and Newcastle were the most likely to see their wallets again and those in Hull, Edinburgh and Cardiff the least likely. Q: Did you ever get your wallet/purse back? 100% 100 94% 92% 88% 82% 78% 79% 79% 80 76% 76% 73% 72% 70% 67% 66% 59% 60 54% 55% 46% 45% 41% 40 34% 33% 30% 28% 27% 24% 24% 22% 21% 21% 20 18% The vast 12% 8% 6% majority of 0 0% Glasgow Edinburgh Newcastle Leeds Hull Sheffield Manchester Liverpool Nottingham Birmingham Norwich Milton Keynes Brighton London Southampton Bristol Plymouth Cardiff people who had their No wallets lost/ Yes All respondants who had their wallet/purse stolenstolen did not have it returned to them UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  14. 14. 14 Card fraud is a common consequence of loss/theft Of those who lost their wallet/purse or had it stolen, one in five claims to have fallen victim to card fraud and one in twenty to identity fraud. Men were marginally more likely to report card and identity fraud than women. Demographically those aged 18-24 were the most likely to report card and identity fraud. Elsewhere 37% of people were concerned about fraudulent transactions when they had their wallet/purse stolen. These figures are consistent with research previously conducted by CPP that reports that as quarter of people claim to have fallen victim to some form of card or identity fraud. The types of card fraud associated with lost and stolen cards fall into two main categories – phone, internet and mail order (card-not-present or CNP) fraud and lost and stolen card fraud. CNP fraud commonly involves the theft of genuine card details or the card itself that are then used to make purchases commonly over the internet but also via mail order or the phone. The problem in countering this fraud is that neither the card, nor the cardholder is present when the transaction happens. The last ten years have seen massive growth of CNP fraud although 2009 saw CNP losses fall for the first time. The use of cardholder authentication schemes including Verified by Visa and MasterCard SecureCode by online retailers and card holders has helped as have the increasing use of sophisticated fraud screening detection tools by banks and retailers. In 2009 losses from CNP fraud stood at £266.4m. Elsewhere lost and stolen card fraud happens in shops or restaurants that do not have Chip and PIN verification or where the PIN has been compromised. Due to the success of Chip and PIN this type of fraud is now at its lowest level since 1991. As well as Chip and PIN the use of intelligent computer systems to track customers accounts for unusual spending patterns and an industry hot card file enabling retailers to check whether a card has been reported lost or stolen have been central to the reduction of fraud losses in 2009.UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  15. 15. 15 Q: As a result of your wallet/purse being lost or stolen have you experienced any of the below? 100 80 60 40 20 0 All respondants who had their wallet/purse stolenUK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  16. 16. 16 1.5 Conclusion When we looked at what items had been lost and stolen the results were as expected – cash, debit/credit cards, driving licence, store and membership cards and personal items like photos etc. Worryingly a small minority confessed to carrying their PIN numbers around putting them at increased risk of ATM and retailer fraud, plus liability of any losses incurred due to taking unreasonable care. Trying to quantify the fraud risk, one in five claimed to have been a victim of card fraud and one in twenty identity fraud. The types of fraud associated with lost wallets/purses are most commonly fraud on lost and stolen cards in a retail environment or CNP fraud most notably online transactions. The introduction of secure verification schemes like Verified by Visa and MasterCard SecureCode have helped to reduce unauthorised transactions online, but nothing should be taken for granted. Depending on what items were lost/stolen, other possible consequences could include falling victim to identity fraud with people falling victim to false impersonation in order to take over their accounts or open up new lines of credit in their name. When we looked at the amount of cash lost due to the theft of wallets/purses the average figure was £85 per person, collectively amounting to £765 million over the last five years. There was also a significant fraud risk in that over £7,000 was available in credit and A small reiterated the importance of cancelling lost and stolen cards quickly. minority Not surprisingly the ‘act’ of being robbed was considered the most stressful part of the whole experience. Concerns over lost cash (the £85) and the risk of fraud (the £7,000 confessed to credit) were also deemed stressful. The process of calling banks to cancel and replace payment cards was also rated by a third of people as a stressful experience; perhaps carrying PIN because any perceived delay was thought to increase the propensity of fraud occurring. The fact that many people are unlikely to carry loss reporting numbers with them and numbers having to remember which cards they were carrying is only likely to increase any stress associated with calling their banks. The actual act of speaking with the financial institutionaround putting is unlikely to be considered stressful. Finally, respondents who had their wallets/purses stolen reported that on average they them at spend 110 hours – equivalent to four and a half days – replacing their personal mementos,increased risk payment cards and other lost items. The value in pre-registering payment cards and other identifying documents like passport and driving licence details is brought into sharp focus of ATM and when you consider the consequences of any loss or theft. October will see the next set of fraud losses reported by The UK Cards Association and it retailer fraud will be interesting to see if the reduction of fraud in 2009 was a temporary blip after double-digit growth in 2007 and 2008, or the start of a reduction thanks to industryplus liability of initiatives. Initiatives like the Dedicated Cheque and Plastic Crime Unit who target organised criminal gangs, the Industry Hot Card File that contains information on more any losses than 6 million cards reported lost and stolen, and the Fraud Intelligence Sharing System that shares information on all confirmed, attempted and shared fraud. Whatever the fraud trend, however, it is clear people do lose their wallets and purses and do have them stolen and the inconvenience and stress associated with any such loss is real and significant. Anything consumers can do to plan for such an eventuality will help as they are unlikely to ever see their missing property again despite claims to the contrary. UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  17. 17. 17 1.6 Avoiding Card Fraud Kerry D’Souza, is a card fraud expert at CPP and offers the following advice to consumers to help protect themselves from payment card fraudsters. Kerry has over ten years’ experience and is responsible for CPP’s industry-leading Card Protection product that assists people in the event of lost and stolen payment cards. Kerry is media trained across print and broadcast and is available for media interviews on the issue of payment fraud. Top tips - Never let your payment cards out of sight in a shop or restaurant, as they risk getting copied or cloned - Only carry the cards you need in case you have your wallet/purse stolen. And never carry payment cards loose in a bag or pocket - Never write down your PIN, bank account details or password - Make sure your post is secure. If you are waiting on new credit or debit cards, know when to expect them - When you enter your PIN in a shop or a cash machine, cover the number from prying eyes or hidden cameras. Look out for skimming machines which can be placed over the card slot and contact the police if you see anything suspicious - Sign up to Verified by Visa or MasterCard SecureCode to prevent online fraud - Never respond to unsolicited e-mails or phone calls asking for personal information – your bank will never ask you to confirm your passwords or account details - If your cards are lost or stolen, cancel them immediately or sign up to a Card Protection service that will cancel and reorder all your cards with just one phone call from anywhere in the world - Regularly check your bank statements to keep an eye on undetected fraud - If you shop online make sure you have installed anti-virus software, anti-phishing tools and an active firewall. Never use an unsecure website.UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  18. 18. 18 1.7 For further information please contact: Nick Jones Head of Communications CPP Group Plc Holgate Park York YO26 4GA Tel 01904 544 387 E-Mail nick.jones@cpp.co.uk Web www.cppgroupplc.comUK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010
  19. 19. 19CPP is an award- 1.8 About CPPGroup Plcwinning organisation: The CPPGroup Plc (CPP) is an international Life Assistance business offering bespoke- Finalist in the National management solutions to multi-sector business partners designed to enhance their Insurance Fraud Awards, Counter Fraud Initiative customer revenue, engagement and loyalty, whilst at the same time reducing costs to of the Year category, 2009 deliver improved profitability.- Finalist in the European This is underpinned by the delivery of a portfolio of complementary Life Assistance retail Contact Centre Awards, products, designed to help our mutual customers cope with the anxieties associated with Large Team and Advisor of the challenges and opportunities of everyday life. the Year categories, 2009 Whether our customers have lost their wallets, been a victim of identity fraud or looking- Named in the for lifestyle perks, CPP can help remove the hassle from their lives leaving them free to Sunday Times 2008 enjoy life. Globally, our Life Assistance products and services are designed to simplify the PricewaterhouseCoopers Profit Track 100 complexities of everyday living whether these affect personal finances, home, travel, personal data or future plans. When it really matters, Life Assistance enables people to live- Finalists in the National life and worry less. Business Awards, 3i Growth Strategy category, 2008 Established in 1980, CPP has 10 million customers and more than 200 business partners across Europe, North and South America and Asia Pacific and employs 1,900 employees- Finalist in the National Business Awards, Business who handle millions of sales and service conversations each year. of the Year category, 2007, In 2009, Group revenue was £292.1 million, an increase of more than 12 per cent over the 2009 and Highly previous year. Commended in 2008- Named in the Sunday In March 2010, CPP debuted on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). Times 2006, 2007, 2008 What We Do: and 2009 HSBC Top Track 250 companies CPP provides a range of assistance products and services that allow our business partners- Regional winner of the to forge closer relationships with their customers. National Training Awards, We have a solution for many eventualities, including: 2007 - Insuring our customers’ mobile phones against loss, theft and damage- Winner of the BITC Health, Work and Well-Being - Protecting the payment cards in our customers’ wallets and purses, should Award, 2007 these be lost or stolen- Highly Commended in - Providing assistance and protection if a customer’s keys are lost or stolen the UK National Customer Service Awards, 2006 - Providing advice, insurance and assistance to protect customers against the- Winner of the Tamworth insidious crime of identity fraud Community Involvement - Assisting customers with their travel needs be it an emergency (for example Award, 2006. Finalist in 2008 lost passport), or basic translation service- Highly Commended in The Press Best Link - Monitoring the credit status of our customers Between Business and - Provision of packaged services to business partners’ customers Education, 2005 and 2006. Winner in 2007- Finalist in the National Business Awards, For more information on CPP visit: Innovation category, 2005 www.cppgroupplc.com UK Lost and Stolen Wallets August 2010

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