Amtrak Ridership Growth                 &Intercity Passenger Rail Development              Ray Lang       Amtrak Governmen...
Amtrak Then and Now                                     • On our opening day in 1971,                                     ...
Every day on Amtrak:                       We run trains over a 21,000                       mile system – 60% of them at ...
We carry more than 82,000passengers per day
And we operate and maintain arailroad that carries about a quarterof a million riders – every day!
Amtrak Ridership Growth Record   Another Amtrak Ridership                      44% increase in Amtrak ridership from FY 20...
Amtrak Ridership Growth  • In FY 2011, the state-supported and short distance routes had their best    year ever with 14.8...
Amtrak Ridership and Funding
Intercity passenger transportation in the United States                                                                   ...
Long Distance trains are an important public service                                       States served only by Long Dist...
Amtrak trains provide vital service to rural communities                                                   States with lea...
The Amtrak system today…
…and as it would look without the long distance trains
Long Distance Network as a Foundation for Corridors  • Being studied now in Texas, Louisiana, Minnesota and Kansas    – Ea...
One Size Does NOT Fit All  • Amtrak has contracts to operate services in 15 states  • Some are individual contracts with s...
One Size Does NOT Fit All  • California    – Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority contracts with Amtrak for train      ...
What does the future hold?                38% population growth                                      • Population         ...
What are the implications?  • People are moving to areas where    – Transportation network is stressed    – Taxes and cost...
Passenger rail is a better travel choice        Share of CO2 Emissions, by mode                                           ...
Operating Efficiency                                                             Farebox Recovery Ratio                   ...
Equipment utilization                                   Average annual car miles, In thousands                            ...
What can we do?  • A new surface transportation policy must break the funding silos    and must be revolutionary – so that...
Key Concepts                                        • Existing system serves as a foundation for                          ...
What should we resist?   • The temptation to resort to 1960s solutions     – Build a lane     – Add an interchange   • Inv...
A 1960s                          solution –                          That doesn’t                          work today     ...
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  • FY 13 Grant Requests (and FY 12 Actual Funding) $1.435 million for Capital ($681 million in FY 12) $450 million for Operating ($466 million in FY 12) $212 million for Debt Service ($271 million in FY 12) Total is $2.167 million ($1.418 in FY 12) Current Approps Status Senate has marked Amtrak up for $1.45B A passenger rail grant program will be funded at $100 million TIGER likely to be funded at $500 million
  • Amtrak operates 15 long distance trains In many areas, only Amtrak service, in some areas, only form of scheduled intercity transportation Travel as far as 2,400 miles, pass through as many as 12 states In many rural areas, the only scheduled intercity travel choice Major generators of revenue and passenger mileage in FY 2011 Generated 14.9% of Amtrak’s ridership, but 25% of ticket revenues LD trains carried 42% of passengers with disabilities who used Amtrak (total of 130,004) Sleeping cars generated 15% of LD passengers, but 36% of LD ticket revenues Since 2006, LD ridership and ticket revenue have grown substantially Significant improvements in on-time performance since 2006 LD ridership has grown by more than 21% LD ticket revenue has grown more than 34%
  • Amtrak serves about 40% of America’s rural population Percentage of rural population without access to scheduled intercity transportation (rail, air, bus) rising 4% of America’s rural population lost their access in 5 years (2005-2010) 152 of 528 Amtrak stations serve rural areas Sharp reductions in intercity bus service have cut rural coverage Busses serve 11% fewer rural Americans in 2010 than 2005 About 15.7% of rural residents enjoy access to only one mode Number of Americans who are served only by Amtrak has tripled since 2005 (~300K to ~900K) Rural coverage is highly uneven In 26 states, 90+% of rural residents live within 25 miles of at least 1 mode In the average state, 78% of rural residents live within 25 miles of at least one mode In ten states, fewer than 78% of rural residents have access to any scheduled intercity transportation Coverage has fallen since 2005 in 8 of these 10 states
  • Rbl louisiana presentation

    1. 1. Amtrak Ridership Growth &Intercity Passenger Rail Development Ray Lang Amtrak Government Affairs & Corporate Communications
    2. 2. Amtrak Then and Now • On our opening day in 1971, Amtrak operated 184 trains • Today, even after numerous route closures and system cutbacks, we operate Daily train densities on Amtrak’s 305 daily trains national system, 2010
    3. 3. Every day on Amtrak: We run trains over a 21,000 mile system – 60% of them at 90+ mph
    4. 4. We carry more than 82,000passengers per day
    5. 5. And we operate and maintain arailroad that carries about a quarterof a million riders – every day!
    6. 6. Amtrak Ridership Growth Record Another Amtrak Ridership 44% increase in Amtrak ridership from FY 2000 - FY 2011 • In FY 2011, Amtrakrecord of nearly 30.2 million passengers in FY 2011 passengers •All-time carried an all-time record of 30,186,733 (up 5.1 percent vs. annual routes setrecord set recordsthe FY 2011 •New •26 of 44 FY 2010) ridership ridership in 8 of in last 9 years • 31,000,000 is the best ridership performance by Amtrak in its 40 year FY 2011 30,000,000 The previous record was set in FY 2010 at 28.7 million million history.  30.2 passengers. 29,000,000 28,000,000Total Ridership • 27,000,000 has now set new ridership records in eight of the last nine years. Amtrak 26,000,000 • 25,000,000 ridership is up 44 percent since FY 2000. Amtrak 24,000,000 • 23,000,000 In FY 2011, 26 of 44 Amtrak routes set new ridership records. 22,000,000 • 21,000,000 In FY 2011, the number of Amtrak routes with ridership of more than one 20,000,000passengers grew to seven (up from five in FY 2010) million 20.9 million 00 01 02 06 07 08 09 10 11 03 04 05 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Fiscal Year New ridership record set Revised October 2011
    7. 7. Amtrak Ridership Growth • In FY 2011, the state-supported and short distance routes had their best year ever with 14.8 million passengers (up 6.5 percent vs. FY 2010) - Specifically, 20 of 27 routes in this category set new ridership records • In FY 2011, the long-distance trains had their best ridership in 16 years with 4.5 million passengers (up 1.1 percent vs. FY 2010) - Specifically, 5 of 15 routes in this category set new ridership records • If not for several significant weather-related and construction-related service disruptions, the Amtrak ridership numbers would likely have been even better • In FY 2011, Amtrak collected an all-time record of nearly $1.9 billion in ticket revenue (up 8.5 percent vs. FY 2010)
    8. 8. Amtrak Ridership and Funding
    9. 9. Intercity passenger transportation in the United States Federal Investment in Transportation, 1949-2008 70 (2009 Constant Dollars. Time Axis Not to Scale.) • Since WWII, Federal 60 government has vastly expanded investment in Highway Air 50 aviation and highways Intercity Passenger Rail $ Billions 40 • Since Amtrak was created to 30 20 take over rail passenger 10 service in 1971, Federal 0 investment in intercity 1955 1957 1991 1949 1951 1953 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 1,200 Fiscal Year passenger rail has been U.S. Intercity Travel Trends by Modal Share, 1929-2004 dwarfed by investment in 1,000 Airport & competing modes B-707 Airway Trust in Service Fund Created 800 Interstate System 80% Complete • For every dollar FederalPassenger Miles (billions) 600 Interstate Amtrak Created government spent on rail 400 System Started between 1956 and 2006, it Bus Auto spent: Air – $6 on aviation 200 WWII Rail 0 – $16 on highways 1944 1951 1967 1975 1977 1985 1993 1995 2003 1929 1961 1963 1965 1969 1971 1973 1979 1981 1983 1987 1989 1991 1997 1999 2001
    10. 10. Long Distance trains are an important public service States served only by Long Distance • On half of our system, the only Trains form of service Idaho Arkansas Montana Louisiana – 23 of 46 states North Dakota Mississippi – 223 of 500+ stations Minnesota Alabama Iowa Georgia • Major generators of revenue Nebraska Florida and passenger mileage in FY Kansas Tennessee 2011 Colorado South Carolina Utah Kentucky • Since 2006, LD ridership and Nevada Ohio ticket revenue have grown Arizona West Virginia substantially New Mexico
    11. 11. Amtrak trains provide vital service to rural communities States with least• Amtrak serves about 40% of America’s comprehensive rural rural population population coverage North Nebraska• Percentage of rural population without Dakota access to scheduled intercity South Kansas transportation (rail, air, bus) rising Dakota West• Sharp reductions in intercity bus service Alabama Virginia have cut rural coverage Wyoming Montana• Rural coverage is highly uneven Kentucky Arkansas Green indicates Amtrak serves the state; red indicates Amtrak does not Source: BTS
    12. 12. The Amtrak system today…
    13. 13. …and as it would look without the long distance trains
    14. 14. Long Distance Network as a Foundation for Corridors • Being studied now in Texas, Louisiana, Minnesota and Kansas – East Texas Corridor, Ft. Worth to Shreveport/Bossier City (Texas Eagle route addition/frequency increase) – Minneapolis/St. Paul to Chicago (Empire Builder frequency increase) – Kansas City/Newton to Oklahoma City/Ft. Worth (Southwest Chief/Heartland Flyer route addition/frequency increase) • Leverages existing Amtrak stations/infrastructure and frequencies – Significantly less cost than adding all-new or restoring previous routes – Historically successful in California/Pacific Northwest, Chicago Hub, Northeast – Improves financial performance of current Amtrak services • Partnerships with State DOT’s and local entities – Fastest growing part of our business
    15. 15. One Size Does NOT Fit All • Amtrak has contracts to operate services in 15 states • Some are individual contracts with state DOT’s for services that operate across state lines, such as 200,000 passengers – Blue Water and Pere Marquette in Michigan (to/from Chicago without Indiana stops and without funding from Indiana and Illinois) 77,000 passengers – Vermont (Vermonter to/from New York City with stops in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut but without funding from those states) • Some are across state lines with shared state DOT funding – Hiawatha Service shared between Illinois and Wisconsin 800,000 passengers – Cascades shared between Oregon and Washington 200,000 passengers – Heartland Flyer shared between Texas and Oklahoma 84,000 passengers • Some are across state lines with a regional entity – Downeaster between Portland, Maine, and Boston 520,000 passengers - Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority (NNEPRA) created by Maine and funded with state and federal DOT funds with stops in New Hampshire and Massachusetts but without funding from those states
    16. 16. One Size Does NOT Fit All • California – Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority contracts with Amtrak for train operations and with Bay Area Rapid Transit with funding from California DOT for Capitol Corridor trains between the Bay Area and Sacramento/Auburn - Six local transit agencies in eight counties 1.7 million passengers - Two metropolitan planning organizations 2.8 million passengers – San Luis Obispo-Los Angeles-San Diego (Pacific Surfliner service) corridor and Oakland-Sacramento-Bakersfield corridor (San Joaquin service) - Controlled directly by California DOT (Caltrans) 1.1 million passengers - Pending legislation creates new Joint Powers Authorities for these corridors • Minnesota – Chicago-Twin Cities service being studied by Minnesota DOT with additional funding from the City of LaCrosse, Wisc., without active participation by Wisconsin DOT – Twin Cities-Duluth being studied by Northern Lights Express, a joint powers board of six counties that contributes as an alliance with funds from property or sales taxes and grants, without active participation by Minnesota DOT. State law gives counties authority to form regional railroad authorities and levy local taxes for them.
    17. 17. What does the future hold? 38% population growth • Population by 2050 18% population growth by 2050 – 2000: 281M 36% population growth 17% population by 2050 growth by 2050 – 2050: 420M 31% population growth • Distribution: by 2050 – 2000: 60% in 38% population single-detached growth by 2050 houses 46% population growth by 2050 – 2050: 70% will live 62% population growth by 2050 in “megaregions” 45% population surrounding growth by 2050 urban areas 35% population growth by 2050Source: Regional Plan Association
    18. 18. What are the implications? • People are moving to areas where – Transportation network is stressed – Taxes and cost of living are high – Infrastructure and energy networks are already burdened – and it’s hard to build more • Demand for everything is growing in areas where it’s hardest to satisfy • Cheap and readily available oil underpins everything – Transportation – Economy – Daily life
    19. 19. Passenger rail is a better travel choice Share of CO2 Emissions, by mode Passenger capacity per meter of infrastructure width 2.4% Passenger cars 2.7% Light-duty 10000 trucks 9000 2.3% All other trucks 8000 9.1% Persons per hour Busses 7000 0.6% 33.9% 6000 Aircraft 5000 9000 21.4% Ships and 4000 boats 3000 27.5% Rail 5200 2000 Other 1000 200 1500 0Source: US DOT, 2008 Trans Stats Annual Report Auto Bus Bus lane Rail Source: UIC (separate) Energy Intensity of competing modes 4000 3500 BTUs/passenger mile 3000 2500 2000 3437 1500 2995 2398 1000 500 0 Aviation Amtrak Auto Mode of transportation Source: U.S. DOE, Transportation Energy Data Book
    20. 20. Operating Efficiency Farebox Recovery Ratio TRE (Dallas) NM Rail Runner TRE (Ft. Worth) CONNDOT Utah Transit Authority Music City Star (Nashville) Tri-Rail (South FL) Sound Transit MARC Altamont Commuter Express (ACE) NCTD - San Diego Alaska RR Metra (Chicago) VRE (Virginia) Caltrain LIRR South Shore (NICTD) Metrolink (LA) MBTA( Boston) NJ Transit SEPTA VIA Rail Canada Metro-North Commuter Railroad Amtrak 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70Source: APTA, VIA, NMDOT and AmtrakAll data calendar year 2008, except NM Rail Runner (2009) Recovery Ratio We are the American rail industry’s authority on getting the most from of our service
    21. 21. Equipment utilization Average annual car miles, In thousands Alaska RR CONNDOT VRE TRE (Dallas) Sound Transit Music City Star (Nashville) MARC NCTD - San Diego Altamont Commuter Express(ACE) Metra MBTA (Boston) SEPTA Caltrain NJ Transit Metrolink (LA) TRE (Ft. Worth) South Shore NICTD Metro-North Commuter Railroad Utah Transit Authority LIRR Tri-Rail (South FL) Surfliner Horizon Amfleet I Heritage Amtrak All cars Amfleet II Viewliner Superliner 0 50 100 150 200 Average Annual car mileage, in thousands No other North American passenger operator gets as much out of their equipment
    22. 22. What can we do? • A new surface transportation policy must break the funding silos and must be revolutionary – so that we can address these problems: – Environmental and land acquisition processes are time-consuming – Regulatory burdens are formidable – and ironically, some are products of the Interstate highway development process • Federal government must take a more active role (and the FRA is off to a good start) • Without rail, we will get a highway bill – but it won’t be a surface transportation policy
    23. 23. Key Concepts • Existing system serves as a foundation for development – Terminal facilities – Suitable segments are upgraded – Existing network feeds high speed operations • Most foreign systems have developed in this incremental fashion – France - LGV lines use major terminals at endpoints - Speeds gradually upgraded as technology permitted – Germany - High speed equipment preceded high speed lines - Gradual introduction of faster track segmentsSt. Pancras Station, London – then, and now allowed ICE trains to realize their capabilities 23
    24. 24. What should we resist? • The temptation to resort to 1960s solutions – Build a lane – Add an interchange • Investing in infrastructure with a 30 year lifespan • Planning for short-term growth • Funding by mode – rather than developing a flexible, resilient, and connected system
    25. 25. A 1960s solution – That doesn’t work today A New Surface Transportation Act Can Lead To Smart ChoicesRail is the solution we need – safer, greener, healthier!

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