- 1 -Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014
May 5 - 9, 2014
Silver Spring, MD
Health for All
Starts in the
Co...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 1 -
SPONSORS
USAID’s Bureau for ...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 2 -
Dear Friends and Colleagues...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 3 -
CONTRIBUTORS
CORE GROUP OVER...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 4 -
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Contribut...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 5 -
Working Groups are the heart...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 6 -
CORE GROUP POLIO PROJECT
Th...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 7 -
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Dr. Carissa ...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 8 -
PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS
CO-...
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 9 -
AGENDA | TUESDAY, MAY 6 & WEDNESDAY, MAY 7
TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2014
8...
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 10 -
AGENDA | THURSDAY, MAY 8 & FRIDAY, MAY 9
THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014
...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 11 -
PLENARIES | TUESDAY, MAY 6 ...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 12 -
PLENARIES | THURSDAY, MAY ...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 13 -
Engaging Civil Society
Frid...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 14 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUES...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 15 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESD...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 16 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUES...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 17 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESD...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 18 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | WEDN...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 19 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | WEDNE...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 20 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THUR...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 21 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURS...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 22 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THUR...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 23 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURS...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 24 -
CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THUR...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 25 -
of PPH, including comprehen...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 26 -
WORKING GROUP TIME
Communi...
Advancing Community Health Worldwide
Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 27 -
Malaria
Chair: Luis E. Bena...
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet
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Spring 2014 Global Health Practitioner Conference Booklet

  1. 1. - 1 -Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 May 5 - 9, 2014 Silver Spring, MD Health for All Starts in the Community Advancing Community Health Worldwide
  2. 2. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 1 - SPONSORS USAID’s Bureau for Global Health: Health, Infectious Disease, Nutrition Division and the Child Survival and Health Grants Program www.usaid.gov MCHIP is the USAID Bureau for Global Health flagship program designed to accelerate the reduction of maternal, newborn and child mortality in the 30 USAID priority countries facing the highest disease burden. www.mchip.net The CORE Group Polio Project is funded under USAID Cooperative Agreement AID- OAA-A-12-00031 to World Vision. www.coregroup.org/polio Concern Worldwide Georgetown University Institute for Reproductive Health Hesperian Health Guides Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs CONTRIBUTORS Marketplace Sponsors JSI / Advancing Partners & Communities MCHIP - Maternal & Child Health Integrated Program Philips Healthcare Translating Research into Action Project/ URC Worldwide Diagnostics Lunchtime Sponsor The Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) Task Force is sponsoring lunch on Friday, May 9. Thank you to all contributors, supporters and sponsors! CORE Group extends sincere appreciation to Planning Committee Members, Working Group Co-Chairs, Point People, Presenters, Participants, Moderators and Facilitators, Anonymous Donors, and Sponsors.
  3. 3. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 2 - Dear Friends and Colleagues, Welcome to our 2014 CORE Group Global Health Practitioner Conference! Every year we work to improve CORE Group conferences, making them the ultimate destination for skill-building, networking, and program learning in the community health field. Formerly known as the CORE Group spring meeting, the conference now has a new name to more accurately reflect the depth of our gatherings, as well as our focus on health program implementation. The theme of our conference, Health for All Starts in the Community, was selected by our volunteer planning committee to reflect our commitment to Primary Health Care principles, Universal Health Coverage, and the importance of community engagement to make health for all a reality. We are grateful to many: the innumerable volunteers who have given their time to share their personal and organizational program learning with their peers in various sessions; Working Group Chairs who are leading community health efforts in their technical field; our Board of Directors who provide our strategic direction and ensure our organization remains open and transparent. We extend our thanks to our donors and the USAID staff that will share strategies with us for collective input. We have benefitted from the services of Claire Boswell, Conference Planner & Coordinator, and Valerie Stetson, Conference Facilitator, working under the leadership of Shannon Downey, CORE Group Community Health Program Manager. We appreciate the new innovations and logistics from Alli Dean, Office and Membership Manager, and communications support from Pinky Patel and Michelle Shapiro. We thank everyone for participating in our dialogue-based sessions to create new ideas and plans for helping us achieve our collective vision of healthy communities where no woman or child dies of preventable causes. Wishing you an uplifting and informative conference, Karen LeBan Executive Director WELCOME LETTER CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES 1. Explore community health strategies that contribute to improving health for all. 2. Identify and share specific resources and technical information that will accelerate progress towards universal health coverage, focusing on partnership, equity and community, and civil society engagement. 3. Strengthen CORE Group’s Working Groups and Interest Groups, while producing meaningful output through Working Group-led activities, work plan development, participatory events, theory development, and technical recommendations. 4. Foster substantive partnerships and linkages among CORE Group Member NGOs and Associates, scholars, advocates, donors and other partners.
  4. 4. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 3 - CONTRIBUTORS CORE GROUP OVERVIEW Vision Communities where everyone can attain health and well-being. Mission To improve and expand community health practices for underserved populations, especially women and children, through collaborative action and learning. Our Expertise Knowledge Management Neutral, trusted facilitation Training & Conferences CORE GROUP SERVES AS A TECHNICAL HUB FOR: Community Health Approaches Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health Infectious & Non-Communicable Diseases Nutrition Agriculture & Health Interested In Exploring the Possibilities? Contact: Pinky Patel, Communications Manager, ppatel@coregroupdc.org PARTNER WITH CORE GROUP Global Networking Program Learning Documentation & Dissemination Cross-Cutting Approaches Social & Behavior Change Monitoring & Evaluation Community Health Systems Sustainability Learning Collaboratives Secretariat Models Professional Development Why you should partner with CORE Goup: We were established in 1997 – over 15 years of work Our size enables us to respond quickly with lean budgets – a good value added for relatively low cost Working with CORE Group enables quality linkages and outreach to 75+ organizations that work in 180 countries, reaching 720 million people per year OurMembersandAssociatesincludeNGOs,Academics and for-profit organizations Our well-known, dynamic Community Health Network gathers input and disseminate output rapidly We do not implement programs at the field level, so the lack of competition enables us to foster trust and serve as a neutral broker/convener We are seeking partnerships with: Academic institutions to contribute to implementation evidence of "how" an intervention works under what conditions Member and associate organizations to collaborate in high-mortality countries to scale up life-saving interventions New organizations (domestically and globally) to join in creating and diffusing community health learning Private sector organizations to ensure essential commodities and technologies reach the most under served Information technology companies to extend our virtual learning platforms around the world
  5. 5. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 4 - TABLE OF CONTENTS Contributors/Sponsors ..................... Welcome Letter ................................ Conference Objectives ..................... Partner with CORE Group ................. Working Groups ............................... CORE Group Polio Project ................ Keynote Speaker ............................... Pre-Conference Sessions .................. Co-located Events ............................ Agenda ............................................. Session Descriptions Plenaries Tuesday, May 6 ........................ Wednesday, May 7 .................. Thursday, May 8 ...................... Friday, May 9 ........................... Concurrent Sessions Tuesday, May 6 ........................ Wednesday, May 7 .................. Thursday, May 8 ...................... Working Group Time.................... New Information Circuit .............. Lunchtime Roundtables Wednesday, May 7 .................. Thursday, May 8 ..................... Presenter Bios .................................. CORE Group Staff Bios ...................... Notes Page ....................................... CORE Group Membership ................ Join CORE Group .............................. 1 2 2 3 5 6 7 8 8 9 11 11 12 12 14 18 20 26 29 34 35 36 55 57 60 61
  6. 6. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 5 - Working Groups are the heart and soul of CORE Group’s Community Health Network CORE Group Working Groups push the field of community health forward by focusing on specific technical and cross-cutting issues. As the Community Health Network works to fulfill our vision of health and well-being for underserved communities in low- and middle-income countries, Working Groups help articulate that vision from a practical standpoint, identify barriers, and figure out how to move past them. Through Working Groups, dedicated professionals bring their individual and organizational resources to bear to collectively generate ideas, create knowledge, and craft responses that can show health impact on a meaningful scale. Working Groups contribute to: • Developing state-of-the-art tools, practices and strategies to benefit field programs • Exchanging information related to best practices, resources, and opportunities • Linking with academics, advocates and private resources and expertise • Fostering their own professional development • Building organizational partnerships and capacity • Articulating the community health perspective in global policy dialogues and alliances Working Groups are teams of individuals from multiple organizations interested in contributing to further development and understanding of a technical or cross-cutting topic. The groups are self-organizing, self- governing, and adaptive entities that transcend organizational boundaries. Working Groups develop and implement collaborative activities aimed at improving international health and development. Working Groups are established and maintained based on the interest of CORE Group Membership. Choose from the 8 Working Groups: If you are not already a part of a Working Group, please join the Working Group time during this conference (see page 26 for more information). Also sign up for the related listserv at www.coregroup.org/network. By joining a Working or Interest Group listserv, you will receive related communications and updates, and you will be able to write directly to the group to share information and announcements, as well as solicit input on related areas of interest. WORKING GROUPS About Get Involved Community Child Health HIV/AIDS Malaria Nutrition Monitoring and Evaluation Safe Motherhood and Reproductive Health Social and Behavior Change Tuberculosis
  7. 7. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 6 - CORE GROUP POLIO PROJECT The CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP) is a multi-country, multi-partner initiative providing financial support and on-the-ground technical guidance and support to strengthen host country efforts to eradicate polio. Several CORE Group Members come together to implement the CORE Group Secretariat model, a time-tested mechanism for increasing coordination and collaboration. Central to the model and to each CGPP country site is an in-country secretariat — a small team of neutral, technical advisors, independent from any one implementing partner, who facilitate communication, coordination, and transparent decision-making among all partners. Since July 1999, CORE Group, in partnership with UNICEF, Rotary International, WHO, the CDC, the BMGF, USAID, and various governments including India, South Sudan, Ethiopia and Angola, has worked to eradicate polio by mobilizing communities to participate in routine immunization campaigns, vaccination services, and AFP surveillance. In 2012, all of the countries in which CGPP works had achieved polio eradication and there were a record low number of only 232 wild polio cases reported worldwide. To contribute further to global polio eradication, CGPP is expanding project activities to Nigeria, the country with the greatest number of polio cases in 2012. January 13, 2014 marked an incredible milestone for India — three years polio-free! This milestone would not have been possible without all of the incredible work of multiple partners and organizations, including the CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP)—India. The CGPP—India Secretariat formed in 1999 in Uttar Pradesh and consists of a small team of neutral technical advisors directed by Dr. Roma Solomon. The Secretariat team unifies the community-level expertise of iNGOs and local NGOs with the international knowledge and strategies of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) partners. CGPP Erradication Efforts Congratulations to CGPP - India: 3 Years Polio-Free! “This accomplishment would not have been possible without the seamless partnership we all displayed. In the war against polio we were all soldiers together under one command center, that of the government. Never before has there been such a productive interplay between the government and civil society. - Roma Solomon, Director, CGPP - India ” About CGPP
  8. 8. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 7 - KEYNOTE SPEAKER Dr. Carissa F. Etienne was elected Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) by the Member States of the Organization on 19 September 2012 and began her five-year term on 1 February 2013. From March2008until1November2012,Dr.EtienneservedasAssistantDirector- General for Health Systems and Services at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. Prior to that, as Assistant Director of PAHO from July 2003 to February 2008, she led five technical areas: Health Systems and Services; Technology, Health Care and Research; Health Surveillance and Disease Management; Family and Community Health; and Sustainable Development and Environmental Health. During her tenures at WHO and PAHO, Dr. Etienne led the efforts to renew primary health care and to strengthen health systems based on primary health care, promoting integration and improved functioning of health systems. She has also spearheaded policy directions for reducing health inequalities and advancing health for all through universal coverage, people-centered care, the integration of health into broader public policies, and inclusive and participatory health leadership. The World Health Report 2010 – Health systems financing: the path to universal coverage was produced under the direction of Dr. Etienne and WHO’s Deputy Director-General. The report is recognized worldwide for providing an agenda for action by countries at all stages of development to move more quickly and in a sustainable manner towards universal coverage, while proposing ways in which the international community can better support efforts to achieve universal coverage and improve health outcomes. Dr. Etienne has also led the WHO global agenda to support universal access to safe and efficacious medical products and the development of a global code of practice for the international recruitment of health personnel. She also chaired the International Health Partnership (IHP+) initiative, which seeks to commit partners to work together and put into practice international principles for effective aid and development cooperation in the health sector. In her native Dominica, Dr. Etienne began her career as a medical officer at the Princess Margaret Hospital, where she eventually became the Chief Medical Officer. She has also served in other high-level posts in Dominica, including Coordinator of the National AIDS Program, Disaster Coordinator for the Ministry of Health, Chair of the National Advisory Council for HIV/AIDS, and Director of Primary Health Care Services. Dr. Etienne received her medical degree (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery- MBBS) from the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, and her Master in Science (MSc) in Community Health in developing countries from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London. Dr. Carissa F. Etienne Photo © PAHO/WHO
  9. 9. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 8 - PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS CO-LOCATED EVENTS Understanding the Essential Nutrition Actions Framework Monday, May 5, 2014, 9:30am - 12:30pm In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a guide on Essential Nutrition Actions: improving maternal, newborn, infant and young child health and nutrition that summarizes those recommendations which, following systematic review, reflect proven actions that need to be taken to scale within the health sector. This session will demystify the recommendations and guide participants through practical application, resources and best practices for improving and expanding existing health programs. Facilitators: Agnes Guyon, Senior Child Health & Nutrition Advisor, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc; Jennifer Nielsen, Senior Program Manager for Nutrition and Health, Helen Keller International; Victoria Quinn, Senior Vice President, Helen Keller International Latest Learning and Resources for iCCM Monday, May 5, 2014, 2:00pm - 5:30pm Part 1: How to assure availability of medicines and supplies in CCM: an interactive session on supply chain management Facilitators/Speakers: Members of the Supply Chain Management sub group of the global iCCM Task Force Part 2: Strengthening monitoring and evaluation for iCCM: lessons learned and promising innovations Facilitators/Speakers: Members of the M&E sub group of the global iCCM Task Force mHealth Deep Dive: mHealth Interoperability: Connecting People, Technology and Data Monday, May 5, 2014, 12:30pm - 5:30pm The mHealth Working Group is hosting this "Deep Dive" meeting for non-technology folks to focus on interoperability, the invisible framework that underpins mHealth. The objectives of this half-day meeting are to demystify interoperability, showing how technology, people, and data work together, and to demonstrate how interoperability can help you design and use mHealth interventions more effectively. As in previous Deep Dive meetings, interactive activities will allow you get some "hands-on" experience. Post iCCM Evidence Review Symposium Event: An overview of the Symposium in Ghana, March 2014 Friday, May 9, 2014, 1:30pm - 3:30pm Join the Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) Task Force to learn more about the iCCM Evidence Review Symposium that took place in Accra, Ghana in March 2014. Participants will hear a summary of the current state-of-the-art evidence, best practices, and challenges around iCCM policy change, coordination and implementation throughout 30+ African countries.
  10. 10. Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 9 - AGENDA | TUESDAY, MAY 6 & WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2014 8:00am – 8:30am Registration & Breakfast 8:30am – 9:00am Maryland Ballroom Opening, Welcome, & Overview Board Directions Judy Lewis, Board Chair, University of Connecticut 9:00am – 10:30am Maryland Ballroom Keynote: “Universal Health Coverage: Lessons from the PAHO Region,” Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, Director, Pan American Health Organization 10:30am – 11:00am Break | Marketplace Tables Open 11:00am – 12:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 14 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 Adolescent Reproductive Health: What Works, What Doesn't, and How to Tell the Difference Cate Lane, USAID, Global Health, Population and Reproductive Health; Nana Dagadu, Georgetown University Institute for Reproductive Health Potomac Changing Behavior with Women, Girls, Boys, and Men: How Gender and SBC Connect Moderator: Amelia Brandt, Medicines for Humanity; Elizabeth Romanoff Silva, WI-HER LLC/USAID ASSIST Project; Taroub Harb Faramand, WI- HER / USAID ASSIST Project ; Gillian McKay, GOAL; Angie Brasington, Save the Children Assembly Integrating Community-Based Strategies into Existing Health Systems: The Unique Role of INGOs Will Story, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Laura Altobelli, Future Generations; Judy Lewis, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; David Shanklin, Independent Consultant Chesapeake 2 & 3 Models for Strengthening the Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) Facilitator: Jennifer Nielsen, HKI; Hedwig Deconinck, CMAM Forum; Maureen Gallagher, Action Against Hunger-US; Geraldine McCrossan, GOAL 12:30pm – 2:00pm Lunch | Board of Director Elections | New Member Orientation 2:00pm – 3:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 15 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 From Uganda to Lebanon: Experiences with Integrating Early Childhood Development, Health & Nutrition Programs Inka Weissbecker, International Medical Corps; Jennifer Burns, International Medical Corps; Mary Helen Carruth, Medical Teams International; Laura Peterson, Hands to Hearts International Potomac Hidden Populations: How Do We Ensure Nobody Gets Left Behind? Moderator: Antony Duttine, Handicap International; Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo, USAID; Dr. Jack Guralnik, HelpAge USA; Gillian McKay, GOAL Ireland; Jennifer Snell, Healthright International; TJay Thirikwa, Human Rights Campaign Assembly How to Ensure Counseling is NOT a Mini-Lecture! Serigne Diene, FHI 360; Sascha Lamstein, SPRING Project/JSI; Janine Schooley, PCI; Rebecca Egan, FHI360 Chesapeake 2 & 3 Harnessing the Untapped Potential of Faith Groups to Improve Health Indicators Victoria Graham, USAID; Nancy Pendarvis Harris, JSI & APC; Mona Bormet, CCIH; Leah Elliott, APC & FHI360 3:30pm – 4:00pm Break | Marketplace Tables Open 4:00pm – 5:30pm Working Group Time | See page 26 for additional WG information 5:30pm – 7:30pm Social Networking Reception at The Fillmore Silver Spring | Innovation Poster Display WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2014 8:00am – 8:30am Registration & Breakfast 8:30am – 9:00am 9:00am – 10:30am Maryland Ballroom Welcome & Daily Announcements | New Board of Directors Announcements New Information Circuit | See page 29 for circuit table information 10:30am – 11:00am Break | Marketplace Tables Open 11:00am – 12:30pm Maryland Ballroom State of CORE Group Karen LeBan, CORE Group Plenary: Inspiration Shop Part 1: Inspiring Organizational Learning, Stacey Young, USAID Inspiration Shop Part 2: Igniting Group Creativity, Lenette Golding, CARE and Guests 12:30pm – 2:00pm Lunch | Dory Storms Voting | Lunchtime Roundtables | See page 34 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 Family Planning 2020 Status Update Potomac Learning and Practice Alliances Assembly Integrating MIYCN with Family Planning in Yemen: Findings from TIPs Operations Research Chesapeake 2 & 3 Learning from Evaluations: Examples from the Child Survival and Health Grants Program 2:00pm – 3:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 18 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 Evidence for Social Accountability: We Have the Tools, But Is It working? Kamden Hoffman, INSIGHT; Thumbiko Misiska, CARE International; Geraldine McCrossan, GOAL; Caroline Poirrier, Results for Development Institute Potomac eHealth/mHealth: Leveraging Technologies for Systems Strengthening in the Community Pamela Marks, ASSIST; Heidi Good Boncana, JHUCCP; Kelly Keisling, Global Healthcare Program Director, NetHope; Vanessa Mitchell, JHUCCP Assembly Health Sector Approaches to Prevent and Respond to Gender Based Violence Phyliss W. Sharps, Department of Community-Public Health, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing; Taraub Harb Faramand, WI-HER LLC /USAID ASSIST Project; Carolyn Kruger, Project Concern International Chesapeake 2 & 3 Integrating Agriculture and Nutrition: Understanding Value Chains and Intersectoral Coordination in Practice Bronwyn Irwin, ACDI-VOCA; KD Ladd, ACDI-VOCA; Jody Harris, IFPRI; Aaron Buchsbaum, SPRING Project 3:30pm – 4:00pm Break | Marketplace Tables Open 4:00pm – 5:30pm Working Group Time |See page 26 for additional WG information 6:00pm – 8:30pm Board of Directors Meeting & Dinner
  11. 11. Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 10 - AGENDA | THURSDAY, MAY 8 & FRIDAY, MAY 9 THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 8:00am – 8:30am Registration & Breakfast 8:30am – 9:00am 9:00am – 10:30am Maryland Ballroom Welcome & Daily Announcements Plenary: Strengthening Community Health Systems Bonnie Keith, APC/JSI; Henry Perry, JHSPH 10:30am – 11:00am Break | Marketplace Tables Open 11:00am – 12:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 20 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 Who's Got Influence: Participatory Mapping of Social Networks Laurette Cucuzza, Plan International USA; Rebecka Lundgren, Georgetown University Institute for Reproductive Health; Sarah Burgess, Georgetown University Institute for Reproductive Health Potomac Thinking Locally and Acting Globally to End Preventable Newborn Deaths Joy Riggs-Perla, Save the Children; Goldy Mazia, MCHIP/PATH; Rachel Taylor, MCHIP/Save the Children; Brianna Casciello, MCHIP/PATH Assembly Childhood Tuberculosis and Community Healthcare Steve Graham, University of Melbourne and Consultant in Child Lung Health, The Union; Alan Talens, World Renew; Anne Detjen, The Union; Kechi Achebe, Save the Children; Fozo Alombah, PATH Chesapeake 2 & 3 NACS Users’ Guide Consultation Serigne Diene, FHI 360; Wendy Hammond, FHI 360 12:30pm – 2:00pm Lunch | Lunchtime Roundtables | See page 35 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 The CSHGP Review - How to Summarize 30 Years of Partnering to Save Lives Potomac USAID Nutrition Strategy "Pre-Launch" Assembly Operations Research That Aims to Draft a BCC Strategy to Improve Quality of Health Services & Care Seeking at the Community Level Chesapeake 2 & 3 Linking Communities and University-based OBGYN Departments in Sub-Sarahan Africa to Improve Health 2:00pm – 3:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 21 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 A 101 (or 100.5) on Systems Approaches to Capacity Building for Community Health Eric Sarriot, ICF International; Ligia Paina, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health; Ilona Varallyay, ICF International Potomac Global Partners Commit to Harmonizing their Support of CHW and Frontline Health Workers Allison Annette Foster, IntraHealth; Diana Frymus, USAID; Lesley-Anne Long, mPowering Front line Health Workers Assembly Community Midwifery and Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage: Implementation Lessons from MCHIP & Mercy Corps Pakistan Sheena Currie, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Ali Abdelmegeid, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Khatidja Naithani, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Kate Brickson, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Andrea Wilson Cutherell, Mercy Corps Pakistan; Jennifer Norman, Mercy Corps Chesapeake 2 & 3 Community Health Workers – The First Line of Defense against Non-Communicable Diseases Patience Ekeocha, Morgan State University Health Center and CCBC Baltimore; Sarah Shannon, Hesperian Health Guides; Christy Gavitt, Global Health Consultant 3:30pm – 4:00pm Break | Marketplace Tables Open 4:00pm – 5:30pm Concurrent Sessions | See page 23 for descriptions Chesapeake 1 Effectiveness of Care Groups and Interpersonal Approaches: Evidence and a Resource Moderator: Tom Davis, Feed the Children; Jim Ricca, Jhpiego; Henry Perry, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Mary DeCoster, Food for the Hungry Potomac CSHGP Operations Research Findings: Studying Systems for Community Health Jennifer Weiss, Concern Worldwide; Khadija Bakarr, Concern Worldwide; David Shanklin, Independent Consultant; Sharif Ullah Khan, AKF; David Hintch, AKF Assembly Improving Quality of Care in Partnership with Governments and Communities Ciro Franco, Management Sciences for Health; Michelle Inkley, Millennium Challenge Corporation; Graciela Salvador-Davila,Pathfinder International Chesapeake 2 & 3 Engaging Communities Moderator: Paul Freeman, University of Washington; Sonya Funna, ADRA; Ane Adondiwo, Catholic Relief Services; Michael Favin, The Manoff Group and MCHIP FRIDAY, MAY 9, 2014 8:00am – 8:30am Registration & Breakfast 8:30am – 9:00am 9:00am – 10:30am Maryland Ballroom Welcome & Daily Announcements | Working Group Report-outs Plenary: Future Directions Moderator: Judy Lewis, University of Connecticut; Elizabeth Fox, USAID Bureau for Global Health; Marie McLeod, Peace Corps; Sam Worthington, InterAction 10:30am – 11:00am Break | Marketplace Tables Open 11:00am – 12:30pm Maryland Ballroom Plenary: Engaging Civil Society Judith Omondi-Anyona, CRS; Roma Solomon, CORE Group Polio Project India Closing Remarks Judy Lewis, Board Chair, University of Connecticut 12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch generously provided by the iCCM Task Force 1:30pm – 3:30pm Chesapeake I Post iCCM Evidence Review Symposium Event An overview of the Symposium in Ghana, March 2014 Presented by the iCCM Task Force
  12. 12. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 11 - PLENARIES | TUESDAY, MAY 6 & WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 Universal Health Coverage: Lessons from the PAHO Region Tuesday, May 6 | 9:30am - 10:30am | Maryland Ballroom Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, Director, Pan American Health Organization In the Region of the Americas, several countries have made the political commitment to embrace Universal Health Coverage (UHC). These countries are at different stages along the path towards UHC and are already producing important lessons on enabling factors. The lessons reflect a diversity of experiences based on national, social, and economic realities and the maturity of the health system. The UHC agenda has triggered an overwhelming response from partners at the country level, as well as in the international community. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has provided critical guidance in the development and implementation of UHC-oriented national policies and strategies. PAHO’s country presence, technical know-how, and recognized convening role have been instrumental in supporting Member State efforts to craft a distinct, strategic approach that will make the Americas the first Region in the world to achieve UHC. In her address, Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, Director of the Pan American Health Organization, Regional Office of the Americas of the World Health Organization, will share new insights on the policy paths countries are following towards the realization of UHC. Dr. Etienne will highlight that UHC is not only about a minimum package of health services. It is not solely about health system financing, neither does it exclude priority health programs, nor does it seek to privatize the health sector. UHC ensures that all people have access to needed services – prevention, promotion, curative, rehabilitation and palliative care- with sufficient quality to be effective and without exposing individuals to financial hardship. UHC is a recommitment of the right to health, equity, and solidarity. It acknowledges the health sector’s specific contributions to health, while recognizing the needed linkages to others sector and development goals. The Inspiration Shop Wednesday, May 7 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Maryland Ballroom Stacey Young, Senior Learning Advisor, Bureau for Policy, Planning and Learning, Office of Learning, Evaluation and Research, USAID; Lenette Golding, Senior Technical Advisor Social and Behavior Change & Advocacy, Food and Nutrition Security Team, CARE Part 1: Inspiring Organizational Learning Everyone agrees that organizational learning is important – why, then, is it so hard to achieve? This session will have two parts: 1. A talk about how USAID is working to embed organizational learning in Mission programs, what that takes, what gets in the way, and how partners can help; and a consideration of the lessons that can be learned and applied in other organizations; 2. An invitation to participants to share their own experiences in sparking organizational learning. Part 2: Igniting Group Creativity Deadlines. Budgets. Downsizing. And now you need to deliver innovation as well. Where do innovative ideas for health and development work even come from? During this trip to The Inspiration Shop, CORE Group Members will reflect on their experiences and experiments in igniting creativity in the workplace. Each panelist will take five minutes to illustrate through pictures, short videos, quotations, sounds, and other media to communicate what inspires their own and others’ creativity. The speakers’ presentations will launch into a larger group discussion. Participants should bring their own examples that they may share with the larger group. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned from USAID’s experience, both the good and the cautionary; learn how, from the implementing side, to plug in to the organizational learning USAID is trying to achieve; and share experiences and lessons learned with others. 2. Taken away new ideas for inspiring creativity in themselves, their colleagues, and their work.
  13. 13. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 12 - PLENARIES | THURSDAY, MAY 8 & FRIDAY, MAY 9 Strengthening Community Health Systems Thursday, May 8 | 9:00am - 10:30am | Maryland Ballroom Bonnie Keith, Senior Technical Advisor, Advancing Partners & Communities/JSI; Henry Perry, Senior Associate, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Strengthening community partnerships and strengthening community-based delivery of health services are now seen as central strategies for improving the health of populations, particularly for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child (RMNCH) health in resource-constrained settings. This session presents an overview of a recently produced innovative online resource on the community health systems of 20 countries, a tool developed by USAID’s Advancing Partners & Communities (APC) project; and an overview of the literature on the effectiveness of community-based approaches to improving RMNCH, and a theory of change framework developed by MCHIP for improving RMNCH. Ms. Bonnie Keith will present the Community Health Systems Catalog, a new resource produced by the APC project. The catalog is a first-of-its-kind interactive reference tool on country community health systems. The catalog details the structure, management, human resources, and policies of community-based health programs in each country, and includes country profiles, national policy documents, and other reference materials. This resource is intended for ministries of health, program managers, researchers, and donors interested in learning more about community health activities. Dr. Henry Perry will present an overview and synthesis of the evidence regarding the effectiveness of community-based primary health care in improving maternal, neonatal, and child health as well as an overview and synthesis of recently published literature concerning community-based approaches for RMNCH programming. Based on this, he will share a comprehensive theory of change framework for how interventions and programs can sustainably improve RMNCH at scale which has been developed by a technical team at MCHIP. His presentation will also describe briefly the newly released final version of MCHIP’s Developing and Strengthening Community Health Worker Programs at Scale: A Reference Guide and Case Studies for Program Managers and Policy Makers. Future Directions Friday, May 9 | 9:00am - 10:30am | Maryland Ballroom Moderator: Judy Lewis, Professor Emeritus, University of Connecticut; Elizabeth Fox, Director, Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition, Bureau of Global Health, USAID; Marie McLeod, Director of the Office of Global Health and HIV, Peace Corps; Sam Worthington, President and CEO, InterAction Three presenters representing Peace Corps, USAID and InterAction will share their organizational perspectives on the global development paradigm shift that is taking place within the U.S. and the world. Over the last eight years INGOs (many members of CORE Group) have experienced shifts in U.S. support to global development. The increase in private investment and remittances now far exceeds funding from bilateral donors. Brazil, Russia, India, and China are transitioning to become aid donors. Inequities are increasing around the world. The U.S. Government has raised global health as a high level security issue. At the same time it has joined other governments in a worldwide commitment to ending extreme poverty and preventable maternal and child deaths. Other USG initiatives are linking nutrition and agriculture toward better food security within Feed the Future and contributing to new global action plans such as the Every Newborn Action Plan, A Promise Renewed, and Family Planning 2020. These strategic shifts are influencing the INGO sector. The “Ahead of the Curve” report on INGOs of the future states that INGOs need to change their strategies to enhance direct implementation, influence systems change, harness the private sector and lead multi-sectoral action. Peace Corps and USAID will share updates on organizational changes and directions, while InterAction will comment on the distinct niche of INGOs in this new environment. A moderated question and answer session will follow. Participants will be asked to provide specific recommendations on actions CORE Group can take to strengthen CORE Group as a partner in U.S. and worldwide global health efforts. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned about organizational directions in global health that respond to shifts in development assistance 2. Contributed ideas and recommendations on actions CORE Group can take to keep the CORE Group community as a partner in U.S. and worldwide efforts
  14. 14. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 13 - Engaging Civil Society Friday, May 9 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Maryland Ballroom Judith Omondi-Anyona, Program Manager, CRS; Roma Solomon, Director, CORE Group Polio Project and Vice Chair of the Steering Committee of the GAVI CSO Constituency What is Civil Society? What are Civil Society and Government expectations from each other? Why should Civil Society be engaged? And how can we work better with Civil Society? In addition to answering these questions, this session will give a global overview of successes in working with civil society drawing on what has been learned from Immunization (GAVI), and specific successes in harnessing this potential in the India Polio Program and partnership. The session will also highlight the roles and contributions of civil society organizations and how they can support accountability, transparency and sustainability. CORE Group Polio Project India Secretariat worked diligently with multiple NGOs, UNICEF, CDC and the Ministry of Health to achieve India’s goal of immunizing every child, contributing significantly to these efforts in the state of Uttar Pradesh, one of the last polio strongholds in India, as well as in Bihar. In January 2014, during Roma’s tenure, India celebrated three years polio- free. The CGPP India Secretariat’s work improved the flexibility of the national polio program to respond to local opportunities and barriers affecting immunization. By providing entry to marginal populations not reached by the national health care system, CGPP India empowered these hard-to-reach and high-risk communities to take on broader health initiatives on their own. CGPP India also channeled two-way communications about acceptability and effectiveness of the national polio efforts at local level. These innovative approaches have been essential for achieving success in eliminating polio transmission in the last remaining areas of India. The approach has been multifaceted, involving partnerships with NGOs, the MOH, and local community leaders; community-based registration of all births with follow-up to identify those in need of immunization; and visitation of all priority households, often with a trusted local leader, to promote acceptance of polio immunization. The successes for the program in India have informed several other national programs and have become the foundation for a global voice through the GAVI CSO Constituency. Investing in Civil Society Organizations for Sustained Impact In 2011 Catholic Relief Services (CRS) was nominated by the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) Civil Society Steering committee to serve as the grant manager for a pilot Civil Society Health Systems Strengthening (HSS) project. The project aims to develop the capacity of CSOs to build functional platforms/networks that are capable of engaging in immunization and Health System Strengthening processes at national level. The CSO project has expanded from providing initial support to seven countries with a budget of 1.8Million USD and is currently supporting 19 countries with a budget of approximately 3.1 Million USD. By the end of 2015, CRS will have supported a total of 23 country platforms and multiple CS organizations. Each country is supported for a period of two years and thereafter expected to graduate. Some of the achievements of the project within the two years are: each of the country supported has been able to form national platforms that coordinate CSO activities including call to action and representing the collective voice of CSO through advocacy. II) Each platform has a seat in key national decision making committees in health such as Immunization Coordinating Committees (ICCs) and Country-Coordinating Mechanisms (CCMs), and HSCC III). The platforms have participated in policy development, developed GAVI HSS proposal and implemented immunization activities at all levels. (IV) Collaborate with donors, Ministries of Health and communities for better outcomes for immunization activities. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Describe who CSOs are, what their strengths are, and how to harness those strengths to make a lasting impact on health. 2. Explain why CSOs should be invested in and what are the lessons learned on HOW best to work better with Civil Society. 3. Identify how CSOs are being engaged, contributing to global efforts, and how they can be better supported for greater influence and sustainability. PLENARIES | FRIDAY, MAY 9
  15. 15. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 14 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESDAY, MAY 6 Adolescent Reproductive Health: What Works, What Doesn’t, and How to Tell the Difference Tuesday, May 6 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Cate Lane, Youth Advisor, USAID, Global Health, Population and Reproductive Health; Nana Dagadu, Program Officer, Monitoring and Evaluation, Georgetown University Institute for Reproductive Health In order to maximize progress in adolescent reproductive health, global health experts need to be familiar with evidence-based interventions that have a positive impact. At the same time, attention should be given to reproductive health programs and tools that did not work. This session will be an opportunity to review adolescent reproductive health from the perspective of what works, what doesn’t, and how we can learn from both. The presenters will provide an overview of tools and techniques, developed for use throughout the stages of adolescence. Participants will also gain new information about the ways that social determinants of health contribute to the burden of disease among adolescents. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Described the linkages between social determinants of health and the global burden of disease in adolescents 2. Distinguished between tools and approaches that work and those that don’t work in the field of adolescent reproductive health 3. Identified at least two challenges related to pregnancy and parenting among very young adolescents Changing Behavior with Women, Girls, Boys, and Men: How Gender and SBC Connect Tuesday, May 6 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Potomac Moderator: Amelia Brandt, Program Manager, Medicines for Humanity; Elizabeth Romanoff Silva, Improvement Specialist for Gender and Knowledge Management, WI-HER LLC/USAID ASSIST Project; Taroub Harb Faramand, Founder and President of WI-HER and Senior Gender Technical Advisor USAID ASSIST Project ; Gillian McKay, Behavior Change Officer, GOAL; Angie Brasington, Community Change and Social Change Advisor, Save the Children Gender norms, values, and inequality have a direct effect on health outcomes. Social and behavior change strategies designed to increase uptake of key maternal, newborn, and child and nutrition health practices cannot ignore the influence of gender on these practices. This session will highlight learning from select initiatives that have addressed gender in order to improve MNCH outcomes. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Identified how gender-sensitive and gender-transformative social and behavior change strategies can improve health outcomes for girls, boys, women, and men 2. Understood how formative research may be used to pinpoint how gender influences specific health behaviors 3. Explained how addressing specific behaviors around community participation and household decision making leads to improved health outcomes Integrating Community-Based Strategies into Existing Health Systems: The Unique Role of INGOs Tuesday, May 6 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Assembly Will Story, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Laura Altobelli, Peru Country Director, Future Generations; Judy Lewis, Professor Emeritus, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; David Shanklin, Independent Consultant Historically, international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) have served as implementing organizations for community- based health programs in low- and middle-income countries that lack the capacity and infrastructure to adequately address preventable causes of maternal and child mortality. Recently, there has been a call for INGOs to reevaluate their role in international health and development and shift from a model of direct service delivery to a model that leverages their strengths and experiences to influence health systems, thereby having impact at scale. During this session, we will present a novel conceptual framework that depicts three primary pathways through which INGOs can catalyze the integration of community-based maternal, newborn, and child health strategies into existing structures and systems at the district, national and global level. We will also present three case studies from a variety of INGOs to illustrate the application of the three
  16. 16. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 15 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESDAY, MAY 6 pathways. We will then discuss the practical implications and the limitations of our framework. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Described the primary mechanisms through which INGOs most effectively integrate community-based maternal, newborn, and child health strategies into existing structures and systems at the district, national and global level. 2. Discussed the mechanisms presented in each case study by which INGOs were able to leverage their unique assets to integrate community-based strategies into existing health systems. 3. Identified limitations and recommend possible modifications to the conceptual framework presented in this session Models for Strengthening the Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) Tuesday, May 6 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Hedwig Deconinck , Technical Advisor, CMAM Forum; Maureen Gallagher, Senior Nutrition Advisor, Action Against Hunger-US; Geraldine McCrossan, Health Advisor, GOAL; Jennifer Nielsen, Senior Program Manager for Nutrition & Health, HKI – Session Facilitator The development of ready-to-use therapeutic foods like PlumpyNut and the simplification of screening using color-coded middle-upper arm circumference measures have revolutionized the treatment of acute malnutrition, but many challenges remain. Among the most pressing are how to integrate these programs into national health systems, ensure reliable supplies of supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), and expand coverage to reach all needy households. This session will include a variety of approaches to strengthening these strategies. We will learn about: the CMAM Forum, an open-access website that aims to share globally relevant up-to-date information, approaches and services provided by actors in the management of acute malnutrition; ACF’s use of socio-cultural assessment to understand community perceptions of acute malnutrition and adapt BCC strategies accordingly; and GOAL’s Nutrition Impact and Positive Practice circles, which use micro-gardening combined with nutrition BCC for the management of moderate acute malnutrition. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned about some of the most innovative solutions identified by the CMAM forum 2. Learned approaches for deepening our understanding of barriers to treatment 3. Learned about alternative approaches for the rehabilitation of MAM From Uganda to Lebanon: Experiences with Integrating Early Childhood Development, Health and Nutrition Programs Tuesday, May 6 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Inka Weissbecker, Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Advisor, International Medical Corps; Jennifer Burns, Senior Development Nutritionist, International Medical Corps; Mary Helen Carruth, Senior Advisor for Maternal and Child Health, Medical Teams International; Laura Peterson, Founder and Executive Director of Hands to Hearts International Global research on brain development has demonstrated and validated the crucial importance of quality early interaction between young children and their caregivers. Early Childhood Development (ECD) is critical in laying foundation for human development, lifelong learning and productivity. However, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), such as: various forms of abuse; neglect; violence between parents/caregivers; other kinds of serious household dysfunction such as alcohol and substance abuse; and peer, community and collective violence; all have lifelong implications for education, health, addiction, violence and even peace. ECD is increasingly being utilized as a highly effective psychosocial intervention by different sectors, including mental health, health and nutrition, and in a variety of contexts. In this session, we will present four case studies:Sierra Leone, Lebanon and two from Uganda, that demonstrate the successful integration and outcomes of merging ECD into emergency, post-emergency, post-conflict and development projects. Case studies will describe: 1) development/ adaption of ECD material to various cultures and contexts, 2) formation of ECD groups, 3) structuring ECD sessions between theoretical and practical training, 4) advocating for peer leaders and training of trainers, and 5) linking of ECD to prevention of ACEs. Country specific data on various outcomes will also be shared, such as ECD knowledge among mothers, health and nutrition knowledge (feeding practices, vaccination), maternal-child interaction, maternal mood/depression, social
  17. 17. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 16 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESDAY, MAY 6 connectedness, and psychosocial well-being of mothers. The session will also include an experiential role play of an ECD activity regarding baby cues. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Recognized ECD as a cross cutting intervention, applicable in diverse settings: emergency, transitional and development contexts 2. Realized the impact of ECD programming, best practices, and identified varying approaches to integrating ECD, Nutrition and Health Programing 3. Connected the implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences with larger goals of development: health, mental health, child protection, violence prevention, etc… and how effective ECD programing may prevent or minimize ACEs Hidden Populations: How Do We Ensure Nobody Gets Left Behind? Tuesday, May 6 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Potomac Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo, Coordinator – Disability & Inclusive Development, USAID; Dr. Jack Guralnik, Board Member, HelpAge USA; Gillian McKay, Behaviour Change Officer, GOAL Ireland; Jennifer Snell, Africa Program Director, Healthright International; TJay Thirikwa, Global Fellow, Human Rights Campaign; Antony Duttine, Rehabilitation Technical Advisor in Global Health, Handicap International (Moderator) Community health programming often calls to reach the most vulnerable or marginalized populations but are we actually achieving this and how do we know if certain populations often seem hidden within their communities. The Secretary- General’s High-Level Panel of eminent persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda called for five transformative shifts in the way we address global development, the first of which was to “leave no-one behind.” The report called to “ensure that no person – regardless of ethnicity, gender, geography, disability, race or other status – is denied universal human rights and basic economic opportunities.” This session aims to break down some of the challenges to identifying, engaging and meeting the needs of some of the often hidden populations in society and discuss ways in which all members of a community can be fully engaged. The session will be a moderated debate between experienced panelists working with different marginalized and often hidden populations who will discuss experiences, good practices, lessons learned and ongoing challenges. There will not be presentations but rather a series of questions and answers both from the moderator and participants of the session. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Described challenges from the ageing, disability, LGBT, indigenous populations and domestic worker perspectives in accessing community health services 2. Identified common approaches and key differences in ensuring that the community health needs of various hidden populations are met 3. Identified ways to improve community health programming to ensure that both general and specific healthcare needs of hidden populations can be met How to Ensure Counseling is NOT a Mini-Lecture! Tuesday, May 6 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Assembly Serigne Diene, Technical Advisor, Nutrition and HIV, FHI 360; Sascha Lamstein, Technical Advisor, SPRING Project/JSI; Janine Schooley, Senior Vice President for Programs, PCI This session is designed to shine a spot light on counseling, an intervention that we all use, but seldom use well. Participants will gain a better appreciation for the challenges and opportunities related to counseling, hear about the importance of counseling in our work, and will have the chance to develop a series of counseling “how to’s” in order to improve techniques and outcomes. Three short presentations will provide specific examples: Serigne Diene - “Counseling: The ‘C’ in NACS”; Sascha Lamstein: “ Reinforcement Visits as a Way of Ensuring Quality Counseling in Haiti”; and Janine Schooley - “The Role of Negotiation in Counseling: Borrowing from TIPs” (Trials of Improved Practices). We will then facilitate some discussion and role play at each table, followed by a presentation of key findings/discovery and recommendations by each table resulting in a counseling tip sheet (do’s and don’ts).
  18. 18. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 17 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | TUESDAY, MAY 6 By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Understood the counseling component of NACS 2. Recognized challenges faced in providing successful counseling 3. Identified and be able to utilize potential methods/approaches to improve the effectiveness of counseling Harnessing the Untapped Potential of Faith Groups to Improve Health Indicators Tuesday, May 6 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Victoria Graham, Sr. Technical Advisor, USAID; Nancy Pendarvis Harris, Vice President, JSI & APC; Mona Bormet, Project Manager for Policy/Advocacy, CCIH; Leah Elliott, Sr. Technical Officer, Advancing Partners & Communities (APC)/FHI 360 Faith entities have a long history of working in global health. In some countries, faith led organizations (hospitals, clinics, programs) provide up to 40% of health services, including services to some of the poorest of the poor. Nevertheless, faith entities remain an often misunderstood and underutilized group in our efforts to improve global health, particularly in sensitive areas such as family planning and HIV/AIDS prevention. By overlooking faith entities, we miss the opportunity to harness their great unrealized potential, as they not only run large health services networks; they are also trusted messengers for health information with deep roots in their communities. And, contrary to popular belief, most faith groups consider family planning to be central to their mission to support women, children and families. This dynamic session will explore the roles and capabilities of faith groups to promote healthy behaviors, particularly those related to family planning. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned what roles faith groups play in promoting healthy behaviors and how they contribute to improving health indicators 2. Discussed how to dispel the rumors that faith entities are opposed to family planning 3. Discussed how NGOs and donors can better engage faith groups and what kinds of technical, financial and public support it takes
  19. 19. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 18 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 Evidence for Social Accountability: We Have the Tools, But Is It Working? Wednesday, May 7 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Kamden Hoffman, President and Senior Technical Advisor, INSIGHT; Thumbiko Misiska, Project Manager Malawi, CARE International; Geraldine Mc Crossan, Global Health Advisor, GOAL; Caroline Poirrier, Senior Program Officer, Results for Development Institute Citizens’ awareness and understanding of their rights and entitlements are core elements of active citizenship. Empowered by such awareness, citizens can become active participants in the reorientation and strengthening of public services. Evidence is growing that when local communities are actively engaged in the assessing and planning of health services, services improve, leakages diminish and utilisation increases. The independent Expert Review Group (iERG) for the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General’s Global strategy for women’s and children’s health called for there to be “a revolution in accountability, putting participatory, democratic review on an equal basis with monitoring in national accountability processes.” Despite these approaches’ growing popularity it is imperative to generate more evidence to ensure that these approaches, as the iERG puts it, “actually deliver benefits for women and children”. The social accountability session will explore different social accountability approaches; what contexts these models are most effective in including cultural, economic, social, and political considerations; what the benefits are for woman and children; and ways to support more effective social accountability interventions, including an online platform that will catalog social accountability interventions around the world, facilitate exchange and learning between practitioners and provide tools to support effective social accountability interventions. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Heard evidence on outcomes and impact from the field on social accountability models 2. Heard information about ongoing evaluations of social accountability interventions 3. Shared information about ways to promote effective social accountability globally eHealth/mHealth: Leveraging Technologies for Systems Strengthening in the Community Wednesday, May 7 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Potomac Pamela Marks, Senior QI Advisor for HIV/AIDS on the ASSIST project; Heidi Good Boncana, K4Health mHealth Portfolio Manager, JHUCCP; Kelly Keisling, Global Healthcare Program Director, NetHope; Vanessa Mitchell, JHUCCP This session will offer participants the opportunity to hear about new evidence, tools and guidance for eHealth/mHealth programs. Presentations and interactive discussions will highlight issues such as scale-up, sustainability, and privacy considerations. Participants will also have the opportunity to contribute to a framework for guiding the consideration and use of mHealth technologies in the context of leveraging evidence-based interventions that have been shown to address quality gaps and overcome systems constraints. Participants can choose 3 of the following interactive small groups to attend: 1. Tools and Resources for mHealth: From Evidence to Planning and Implementation, Heidi Good Boncana, JHU CCP 2. mHealth Field Guide for Newborn Health, Kelly Keisling 3. Bangladesh eHealth Pilot, Vanessa Mitchell, JHU CCP 4. Integration of culturally appropriate MIYCN messages and practice with other sectors, such as family planning or agriculture, Peggy Koniz-Booher and Kristina Beall, JSI By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned about new tools and guidance for including eHealth/mHealth in programs 2. Heard new research in eHealth/mHealth at the community level 3. Explored a framework for guiding consideration and use of technologies for overcoming systems constraints Health Sector Approaches to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence Wednesday, May 7 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Assembly Phyliss W. Sharps, Associate Dean Community and Global Programs Professor, Department of Community-Public Health, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing; Taraub Harb Faramand, Founder & President, WI-HER LLC (Women Influencing Health, Education, and rule of Law)/ USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems (ASSIST) Project; Carolyn Kruger, Senior Advisor Reproductive, Maternal,
  20. 20. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 19 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 Newborn and Child Health, Project Concern International Gender-based violence (GBV); or violence directed at a woman, man, girl, or boy based on that person’s sex, gender identity, or how that person meets or does not meet cultural norms of femininity or masculinity; leads to poor health outcomes, hinders development efforts, and prevents those affected from reaching their potential. While it is estimated that more than 1 in 3 women and girls worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence (WHO, 2013), men and boys are also subjected to GBV, and there is less research and resources surrounding GBV against males. The panel will provide an overview of the burden of the GBV in the U.S. as well as in developing countries, will present examples of current program interventions, and will offer a basic training for development practitioners in designing, implementing, and evaluating health programs by taking gender-based violence prevention and response considerations into account. Discussion will include promotion of awareness, research, and advocacy for the prevention of GBV. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Increased their understanding of the burden of the GBV in the US and developing countries 2. Appreciated the power of research: what we know and don’t know about the causes of GBV and its impact on girls, boys, women and men 3. Described current programmatic interventions that address the causes, promote an integrated response to the prevention of GBV, and mitigate the effects of GBV on survivors 4. Discussed basic considerations and principles to integrate GBV prevention and response considerations into program design, implementation, and evaluation of health projects 5. Engaged in discussions surrounding a plan of action for CORE Group and the SMRH Working Group in promoting awareness, research, and advocacy for GBV Integrating Agriculture and Nutrition: Understanding Value Chains and Intersectoral Coordination in Practice Wednesday, May 7 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Bronwyn Irwin, Senior Technical Director, ACDI-VOCA; KD Ladd, Senior Technical Director, ACDI-VOCA; Jody Harris, Senior Research Analyst, IFPRI; Aaron Buchsbaum, Knowledge Management Coordinator, SPRING Project This session will explore linkages between agriculture and nutrition in several ways. We will begin with an overview of what is meant by the “value chain approach,” and address common misperceptions about whether and how such strategies can help improve nutritional outcomes. We will also discuss how value chains may influence the three key pathways through which agricultural activities potentially contribute to nutrition outcomes: food production, income, and women’s empowerment. The panelists will then present two case studies: a large Feed the Future market development program in Ethiopia that is using appropriate agricultural analogies to teach nutrition concepts to members of farmers’ cooperatives working in six value chains; and a homestead food production project in Burkina Faso in which interviews conducted with managers, frontline workers, and beneficiaries highlighted unique challenges in navigating the intersection between agriculture and nutrition. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Understood how the value chain approach can increase incomes, provide incentives and resources for increased production, and empower women in the agricultural sector 2. Gained insight into ways to make nutrition concepts meaningful to farmers 3. Learned specific challenges of intersectoral strategies
  21. 21. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 20 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8 Who’s Got Influence: Participatory Mapping of Social Networks Thursday, May 8 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Laurette Cucuzza, Sr. Technical Advisor Health, Plan International USA; Rebecka Lundgren, Principle Investigator, Institute for Reproductive Health, Georgetown University; Sarah Burgess, Program Officer, Institute for Reproductive Health, Georgetown University How do new ideas diffuse in a community? Who are the connectors? Who blocks information flow? Join us to discuss approaches to harness the power of social networks and try out participatory mapping exercises designed to engage community members in spreading new ideas. Viewing women and men as members of social networks can help achieve the tipping point in settings where misinformation is the norm and FP use stigmatized. In Benin, Tekponon Jikagou is applying social network analysis methods and theories to address these challenges; testing scalable approaches to address social barriers that prevent individuals and couples from realizing their reproductive intentions. Participants will learn approaches to initiate a process of social norm transformation to increase effectiveness of community mobilization initiatives. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Understood the importance of understanding and addressing social networks when designing and implementing programs to address unmet need for family planning 2. Learned to apply tools to identify social networks and apply this understanding to design social network-informed family planning interventions Thinking Locally and Acting Globally to End Preventable Newborn Deaths Thursday, May 8 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Potomac Joy Riggs-Perla, Director, Saving Newborn Lives Program, Save the Children; Goldy Mazia, Technical Advisor for Newborn Health, MCHIP/PATH; Rachel Taylor, Senior Program Officer, Newborn Health, MCHIP/Save the Children; Brianna Casciello, Program Assistant, MCHIP/PATH How can we take action to end preventable newborn deaths in communities around the world? This session will share guidance, lessons learned and resources gleaned from global and local experiences. An overview of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) will be presented and discussed. ENAP is a ‘roadmap’ developed by global, regional and country stakeholders in an effort to save 3 million lives (newborns, women and stillbirths) each year through improved quality of care at the time of birth and support for small and sick newborns. Following this discussion will be a presentation of lessons learned from one Bangladesh program’s experience supporting community-based maternal and newborn care. The session will conclude with an interactive review of the latest and greatest newborn health tools and guidelines; hard copies and links will be provided for participants to take home. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned the five strategic objectives of the Every Newborn Action Plan and how they relate to programming at community level. 2. A greater understanding of lessons learned from Bangladesh’s experience supporting the provision of newborn health services at community level. 3. The ability to identify at least three technical resources to be used to improve programming of newborn health interventions. Childhood Tuberculosis and Community Healthcare Thursday, May 8 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Assembly Steve Graham, Professor of International Child Health, University of Melbourne and Consultant in Child Lung Health, The Union; Alan Talens, Health Advisor, World Renew; Anne Detjen, Consultant for Childhood TB and Child Lung Health, The Union; Kechi Achebe, Senior Director HIV/AIDS, Advisor, Save the Children; Fozo Alombah, Technical Program Officer, Global HIV and TB, PATH Children with TB usually do not present to TB services but remain in the community and are more likely to present to primary health care units, where TB is often mis-diagnosed as pneumonia or other common illness with similar, unspecific presentation. Recommended approaches for symptom-based screening and management offer an opportunity to decentralize TB care of
  22. 22. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 21 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8 children. Family-centered and community based care models and strategies such as iCCM can be adapted by including simple interventions and used to identify this at-risk population and refer them to the appropriate level of care. The session aims to show some of these opportunities for intervention and engage participants in a discussion on how to address childhood TB outside the TB community. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Discussed the rationale for addressing childhood TB at the community level 2. Thought about approaches on where and how to integrate childhood TB and given practical examples 3. Discussed ways forward NACS Users’ Guide Consultation Thursday, May 8 | 11:00am - 12:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Serigne Diene, Technical Advisor, Nutrition and HIV, FHI 360; Wendy Hammond, Technical Officer, Nutrition and HIV, FHI 360 The Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance III Project (FANTA) invites you to a consultative session on the NACS User’s Guide, a tool to help program managers and implementers integrate nutrition assessment, counseling, and support into prevention, care, and treatment of infectious diseases such as HIV and TB. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned to navigate the modules 2. Provided user comments and questions 3. Heard about coming and planned modules A 101 (or 100.5) on Systems Approaches to Capacity Building for Community Health Thursday, May 8 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Eric Sarriot, Director of CEDARS, ICF International; Ligia Paina, Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health; Ilona Varallyay, Senior Program Associate-CEDARS, ICF International Session will include small group work and short presentations. Concepts and activities will be familiar to those involved with USAID’s Learning Lab, WHO’s Alliance Health Policy and Systems Research, and other proponents of “systems approaches”. Through practical small group examples, participants will get exposure to tools such as causal loop diagrams and network analysis. Facilitators will seek to tease out applications of these tools in the context of capacity building efforts in community health and how they can be used to promote innovation. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Been introduced to systems approaches to capacity building 2. Been exposed to the use and value of causal loop diagrams through practical examples 3. Been exposed to network analysis approaches through practical exercise Global Partners Commit to Harmonizing their Support of CHW and Frontline Health Workers Thursday, May 8 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Potomac Allison Annette Foster, Intrahealth; Diana Frymus, USAID; Lesley-Anne Long, mPowering Front Line Health Workers On November12, 2013,the Global Health Workforce Alliance (GHWA) along with the global community of government leaders, donors, health workers, and civil society working in the area of human resources for health, announced their commitment to align with country objectives and harmonize their actions supporting community health workers (CHWs) and frontline health workers (FLHWs). The “Joint Commitment to Harmonized Partner Action for CHWs and FLHWs” is an agreement among health development partners that the country initiatives and programs on community health workers (including volunteer and salaried) and front line health workers will be recognized and supported within national health strategies through harmonized collaboration,
  23. 23. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 22 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8 accountable actions, and targeted research. During the Thursday session, participants will have a short review of the commitment that was supported in Recife, will learn what is has happened since the commitment was made, and will discuss the importance of harmonization of actors as part of achieving UHC. Session participants will have the opportunity to discuss how they - as implementers, educators, and advocates - can better align with country priorities, harmonize with other partners actors, and contribute to research and continued knowledge building. Community Midwifery and Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage: Implementation Lessons from MCHIP and Mercy Corps Pakistan Thursday, May 8 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Assembly Sheena Currie, Senior Maternal Health Technical Advisor, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Ali Abdelmegeid, Senior Maternal Health Technical Advisor, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Khatidja Naithani, Senior Program Officer, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Kate Brickson, Senior Maternal Health Program Officer, Jhpiego/MCHIP; Andrea Wilson Cutherell, Deputy Director of Health Programs, Mercy Corps Pakistan; Jennifer Norman, Director of Public Health, Mercy Corps Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) continues to be a leading cause of maternal death in developing counties. Diverse program strategies exist to prevent PPH, including engagement with Community Midwives (CMWs) for community-based distribution of misoprostol for use at home birth. MCHIP developed a toolkit and implementation guide for comprehensive PPH programming, including community-based distribution of misoprostol. This interactive session will introduce program implementers to the guide and learning materials in the toolkit. Additionally, Mercy Corps Pakistan has developed a commercially viable model for CMWs to offer high quality, life saving, RMNCH services as financially self-sustaining, private providers. This model is being tested both with Afghan refugees as well as Pakistanis in Pakistan’s most under-served province of Balochistan, where only 18% of deliveries are conducted by a Skilled Birth Attendant. The sessions will highlight key activities at the policy, service delivery, and community level, including a focus on community-based PPH prevention and treatment. This CMW program provides a practical example of community programming for maternal health, and important lessons learned for PPH prevention and treatment. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned about implementation strategies for community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of PPH at home birth 2. Heard lessons learned from Mercy Corps Pakistan’s CMW model to prevent maternal and newborn deaths in a financially sustainable way 3. Discussed ways to apply lessons from the session to maternal health programs working with CMWs Community Health Workers – The First Line of Defense against Non-Communicable Diseases Thursday, May 8 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Patience Ekeocha, Associate Medical Director, Morgan State University Health Center and Adjunct Professor, CCBC Baltimore; Sarah Shannon, Executive Director, Hesperian Health Guides; Christy Gavitt, Global Health Consultant With diagnoses of diabetes, hypertension, cancer, chronic lung disease, and other non-communicable disease (NCDs) increasing worldwide, the epidemic of NCDs threatens to overwhelm under-resourced health systems. Estimates show 80% of NCD related deaths occur in the global south, with an expected increase of 17% in the next 10 years. Community health workers have incredible potential to help address these newer health challenges in their communities and to extend the capacity of health systems. But what are the best roles that community health workers (CHWs) can play in the fight against NCDs? What resources do CHWs have to help them meet these changing circumstances, and how can we help support them? What are some examples of organizations that have mobilized CHWs around NCDs and what can we learn from them? In this session, we will discuss these questions in the context of the NCDs trend worldwide, and how community health workers are a “best buy” for low cost approaches to reducing chronic disease burdens. We will also examine several case studies for effective community-based strategies to combat these chronic illnesses.
  24. 24. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 23 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8 Effectiveness of Care Groups and Interpersonal Approaches: Evidence and a Resource Thursday, May 8 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Chesapeake 1 Moderator: Tom Davis, Chief Program Officer, Feed the Children; Jim Ricca, MCHIP Sr. Learning Advisor, Jhpiego; Henry Perry, Sr. Associate, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Mary DeCoster, Senior Specialist for SBC Programs, Food for the Hungry 1. Emerging evidence that CSHGP projects doubled the rate of child mortality decline. The results from 12 typical CSHGP projects from 2002 to 2007 (the “pre-OR era”) were analyzed by modeling their coverage changes with the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to estimate U5MR changes and comparing with concurrent measured DHS mortality data. The average coverage changes for all interventions exceeded average concurrent trends from DHS. When population coverage changes were modelled in LiST, they were estimated to give a child mortality improvement in the project area that exceeded concurrent secular trend in the subnational DHS region in 11 of 12 cases. The average improvement in modelled U5MR (5.8%) was more than twice the concurrent directly measured average decline (2.5%). This analysis gives plausible evidence that typical CSHGP projects raised coverage for a variety of high-impact interventions and improved U5MR by more than twice the concurrent secular trend. The strategies community-based interpersonal behavior change interventions should be targeted for further study and scale up to help countries meet MDG4 targets. 2. This presentation will describe the findings of an analysis of the estimated mortality impact of recent Care Group child survival projects compared to child survival projects not using the Care Group approach. Care Group projects are characterized by the formation of groups of 10-12 volunteers who meet at least once a month with a facilitator and who are each responsible for conveying a new health education message to 10-12 households. USAID-supported child survival projects were identified for countries in which there were DHS data available within 3 years of the project’s initiation and completion. Nine Care Group projects met these criteria. Twelve non-Care Group projects carried out in the same country were also included in the analysis. Mortality impact was assessed using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST), which is based on changes in coverage of key effective child survival interventions. The analysis demonstrates that the estimated annual mortality decline in Care Group projects was 1.6 times greater than in the child survival projects that did not use the Care Group approach (5.8% versus 3.7%). A similar type of analysis has indicated that USAID-supported child survival projects (both Care Group and non-Care Group projects together) appear to reduce under-5 mortality at a rate that is twice as great as the underlying secular trend. Among USAID-supported child survival projects, the Care Group approach appears to be more effective than other child survival projects that also use participatory community-based approaches. Based on this evidence, on other published evidence regarding the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, and on the enthusiasm for the approach that has arisen from NGOs that have used it, there is now a need for further efforts to scale up the Care Group approach, to implement it as part of national community-based programs, and to carry out further studies of its effectiveness relative to other approaches involving participatory women’s groups – most notably those that employ participatory learning and action (PLA), for which there is also considerable evidence of effectiveness arising from randomized controlled trials. 3. Care Groups: A Training Manual for Program Design and Implementation. This presentation will present changes and features on Care Groups that are in the soon to be released Food for the Hungry Care Groups manual. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Reviewed emerging evidence and analyzed why CSHGP projects doubled the rate child mortality decline. 2. Reviewed the evidence and anlyzed why Care Group projects had high estimated mortality impact. 3. Understood changes in the new Food for the Hungry manual: Care Groups: A Training Manual for Program Design and Implementation CSHGP Operations Research Findings: Studying Systems for Community Health Thursday, May 8 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Potomac Jennifer Weiss, Health Advisor, Concern Worldwide; Khadija Bakarr, Field Program Manager, Concern Worldwide; David Shanklin, Independent Consultant; Sharif Ullah Khan, Senior Health Program Officer, AKF; David Hintch, Health Program Officer, AKF This session will focus on operations research findings from CSHGP projects implemented by Concern Worldwide, Aga Khan Foundation, and ChildFund. The presenters will discuss the relevance of their studies for community health policy and
  25. 25. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 24 - CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8 practice, locally and globally. The presenters will also discuss lessons learned about the opportunities and challenges they experienced in carrying out this research. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Heard about methods and findings from operations research 2. Explored the relevance of findings for community health policy and practice 3. Discussed lessons learned about how to conduct operations research Improving Quality of Care in Partnership with Governments and Communities Thursday, May 8 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Assembly Ciro Franco, Senior Principal Technical Advisor for MNCH, Management Sciences for Health; Michelle Inkley, Associate Director, Education, Health and Community Development, Millennium Challenge Corporation; Graciela Salvador-Davila, Senior Technical Advisor for Maternal and Newborn Health, Pathfinder International This session will look at improving quality of care in partnership with governments and communities across different countries and approaches to address iCCM, reducing stunting and postpartum hemorrhage. High quality care for children under 5, provided by the community, for the community To address the high child mortality rate related to inaccessibility of health services and medicines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), integrated community case management (iCCM) sites serve as a first point of care for managing childhood diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria cases. To bolster utilization of iCCM sites, the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project (IHP) in DRC, implemented by Management Sciences for Health, launched a collaborative approach strategy that has improved the quality of care provided at the community level and strengthened links between community health workers (CHW), the community, and health referral systems. Implemented in 49 iCCM sites across five health zones, the approach focuses on training coaches that in turn assist Quality Improvement Teams through technique trainings on basic care management. Focusing on community engagement and empowerment, the collaborative approach encourages bi-monthly community meetings, led by local leaders with the participation of CHWs, health promotion workers, residents and, occasionally, head nurses. The collaborative approach addresses the issue of poor health worker training through supportive supervision. With the success of the collaborative approach to improve the quality of care in community care sites and to increase the rate of utilization, IHP – which supports a total of 285 sites across 35 health zones -- plans to extend adapted elements of the collaborative approach to additional community care sites. Community-driven development (CDD) program in Indonesia Based on a theory of change that includes both the demand and supply side factors required to reduce stunting, the MCC- funded project in Indonesia is an excellent example of country ownership as it builds on the Indonesian government’s existing community-driven development (CDD) program, PNPM Generasi. Through community action, villages assess and prioritize health and education needs and determine how to best use a community block grant to reach health and education targets. As villages engage in finding and implementing solutions for health and education challenges at the community-level, they also begin to demand improved health services from the health system. The MCC investment of approximately $131 million enhances the standard PNPM Generasi program by adding activities to strengthen the health system to meet the increased community demand for better tools and services to combat stunting and improve health. The project is also an example of integration and community engagement throughout, as all activities are built on the foundation of community action, including involvement of both women and men, coupled with increasing their willingness to change deleterious behaviors related to child feeding, resource allocation, and utilization of medical services, in the prevention and treatment of stunting. The project sites are randomly selected such that a rigorous impact evaluation will provide evidence on overall project success. Community and clinical action to address postpartum hemorrhage To address postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) as now the direct cause of nearly 25% of pregnancy-related deaths for women, Pathfinder International developed the Community and Clinical Action to Address Postpartum Hemorrhage (CCA-PPH) model, a continuum of care. The goal of this model is to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality by treating PPH in a holistic manner, with a clinical continuum from prevention to treatment that starts at the household and community level and works up through all levels of the health care system. Pathfinder’s CCA-PPH model incorporates prevention, recognition, and treatment
  26. 26. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 25 - of PPH, including comprehensive antenatal care, support for awareness of danger signs, standard methods for estimating blood loss, community-level engagement, and advocacy at all levels regarding the need for a continuum of care. To date, Pathfinder’s CCA-PPH model has been implemented in Peru, Nigeria, Tanzania, India, Burundi and Bangladesh. Findings from a 2011 external evaluation of Pathfinder programs implementing the model in Nigeria and India note a decrease in women dying from PPH in project sites. As evaluators confirm, the model serves as an effective mechanism for strengthening health system capacity to address not only PPH, but to deliver quality obstetrical care overall: “… Packaging of the full range of interventions to address PPH was unique and we believe was what made the difference.” Pathfinder’s presentation will focus on implementation opportunities and challenges, and offer lessons learned for application in other contexts. Engaging Communities Thursday, May 8 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Chesapeake 2 & 3 Moderator: Paul Freeman, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Global Health, University of Washington; Sonya Funna, Senior Technical Advisor for Health, ADRA; Ane Adondiwo, EPPICs Project Manager, Catholic Relief Services; Michael Favin, Vice President, Programs, The Manoff Group and Senior Technical Advisor, MCHIP During this session, participants will hear about three examples of strategies to engage communities in improving health, identifying common elements among the three that made them successful. 1. Community Organizations - Key Component of Primary Health Care in Developing Countries - Organizations within communities, such as Community Health Councils and Community Leadership Councils, can have a key role in dealing with many of the current problems that occur when delivering Primary Health Care in developing countries. With clinical supervision from the local health center, a variety of community health workers can come together to provide the range of health activities that are needed to deal with the range of common causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Key findings from an example of such organizations recently evaluated in rural Mozambique will be presented to illustrate these points. 2. Integration of Community Emergency Transport Systems with Repositioning TBAs as Link Providers Improves Skilled Assisted Childbirth in Northern Ghana: This session will present and discuss the positive outcomes of intervention that integrated the establishment of community-based emergency transport systems (CETS); identification and repositioning active traditional birth attendants as link providers contributed in improvements in the use of skilled professionals for childbirth. 3. Partnering with Communities to Change the Immunization Paradigm: Experience in Timor-Leste: Although community participation in immunization (beyond using available services) is the exception rather than the rule, there is wide scope for communities and health services partnering to protect children from vaccine-preventable diseases. A project in Timor-Leste facilitated various forms of such partnering. As one example, the project piloted use of a tool that enables community-based health workers or volunteers to register all of the community’s infants and to track each child’s individual vaccinations. The tool can be used to develop a “due list” before vaccination sessions as well as to identify children falling behind, so their families can be visited and motivated to have the child get missing vaccinations. An analysis of data in Timor-Leste indicated that the tool had a positive impact on the timeliness of vaccinations but no demonstrable impact on coverage. Qualitative feedback was very positive. The tool helped created a sense of joint responsibility for vaccination between communities and health facilities. There were also some minor complaints from vaccinators about extra work and from volunteers about lack of incentives. By the end of this session, Participants will have: 1. Learned about common problems with sustaining PHC interventions at the Community level and how each of these problems can be addressed by Community Organizations 2. Learned about community leadership councils as an example of how the ADRA project in rural Mozambique successfully addressed these problems 3. Learned how repositioning TBAs as link providers and integrated establishment of community-based emergency transport systems (CETS) has resulted in positive maternal and newborn health outcomes CONCURRENT SESSIONS | THURSDAY, MAY 8
  27. 27. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014 - 26 - WORKING GROUP TIME Community Child Health Co-Chairs: Alan Talens, World Renew; Alfonso Rosales, World Vision; Fe Garcia, World Vision Tuesday, May 6 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Chesapeake 1 The Community Child Health Working Group will host a presentation: Automated Respiration Rate Monitor Presenter: Niels Buning, Venture Manager Healthcare, Strategy and New Business Development, Philips Healthcare Africa Philips Research is developing an Automated Respiration Rate Monitor that can provide a reliable measurement for children under five. It is specially designed for Community Health Workers in low-resource settings. After the presentation, we will proceed to updates in community child health and completion of the work plan. Wednesday, May 7 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Chesapeake 1 The Community Child Health Working Group will host a presentation: Implementing Community Case Management (CCM) in Emergencies Presenter: Nathan Miller, Health Advisor - Community Case Management, UNICEF - Health Section They will review experiences with and lessons learned from implementation of community case management of childhood illnesses in emergency and fragile contexts and discuss efforts to implement CCM in current crises. Nate has several years’ experience as a global health program manager, technical advisor, and researcher. His work has been focused on child survival and control of infectious diseases. Over the last four years, Nate worked on an evaluation of integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) in Ethiopia. He has also provided short-term technical support in Haiti, Mozambique, the Central African Republic, and East Timor. Currently, he is working with UNICEF conducting operational research and providing technical support for implementation of iCCM in emergencies. Read his full bio on page 48. HIV/AIDS Chair: Janine Schooley, Project Concern International Tuesday, May 6 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Maryland Ballroom The HIV Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Wednesday, May 7 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Maryland Ballroom The HIV Working Group will host a presentation: Keeping the Flame of HIV Prevention Burning HIV infection has been perceived as a single disease entity, when it should be treated as a cross-cutting health problem within the “continuum of care” framework of maternal, newborn, and child health through the life cycle approach in order to mitigate its impact on children, women and men. The impact of HIV is cross cutting touching every fabrics of the society – physically, socially, economically, development and national security and prevention should be comprehensive in order to mitigate its impact. The presentation will focus strategies that promote and maintain momentum on comprehensive HIV prevention among vulnerable hard to reach populations to keep the flame of HIV prevention burning. World Vision will share her experience working with other partners to maintain and sustain HIV prevention through prevention of mother to child transmission, pediatric HIV, voluntary male circumcision, HIV/TB co-infection, health systems strengthening. These will include lessons learned and best practices contributing to the global goal of eliminating new infections to end the HIV epidemic.
  28. 28. Advancing Community Health Worldwide Global Health Practitioner Conference | Spring 2014- 27 - Malaria Chair: Luis E. Benavente, Medical Care Development International Tuesday, May 6 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Chesapeake 1 The Malaria Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Wednesday, May 7 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm |Chesapeake 1 The Malaria Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Monitoring & Evaluation Chair: Todd Nitkin, Medical Teams International Tuesday, May 6 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Maryland Ballroom The M&E Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Wednesday, May 7 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Maryland Ballroom The M&E Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Nutrition Co-Chairs: Jennifer Nielsen, Helen Keller International; Justine Kavle, PATH; Kathryn Reider, World Vision Tuesday, May 6 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Assembly The Nutrition Working Group will review technical updates and accomplishments from FY14; discuss current priorities and strategic directions for Working Group members and begin drafting FY15 work plan. Wednesday, May 7 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm | Assembly The Nutrition Working Group will host a presentation: Pioneering the Food for Peace Prevention of Malnutrition Under 2 Approach (PM2A): CRS and Mercy Corps’ Experiences Presenters: Raphael Bajay-Tchumah, Chief of Party Tubaramure Project, Basile Mukenge, IMC-Burundi Country Director and Evelyn Ngomirakiza, Director of the National Program of Nutrition/MoH-Burundi; Jay Jackson, Chief of Party, PROCOMIDA; Marcel Janssen, Technical Support Unit Director, PROCOMIDA; Penny Anderson, Mercy Corps Director of Health, Nutrition and Food Systems In 2009, Food for Peace launched its PM2A initiative, funding special Title II awards in Guatemala and Burundi that took a specifically preventive approach to addressing child stunting. In this session, we will explore the context in which both projects have operated, in particular the opportunities and challenges faced in coordinating this ambitious approach with the host governments’ own national nutrition strategies. Burundi had previously focused only on acute malnutrition, so the preventive approach was new to government partners. In contrast, Guatemala had an established environment for preventive nutrition approaches, which occasionally led to contradictions between PM2A and the government’s own programs and strategies. How were such tensions resolved? This session will share lessons learned by Catholic Relief Services. WORKING GROUP TIME

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