PREVENTION IN ACTION
Lessons Learned and a Model for
Social Mobilization to Address
Violence Against Women in South Africa...
• Program led by Project Concern International (PCI) and the KwaZulu-
Natal and Western Cape networks on VAW
• A baseline ...
Emerging program design
• The new logo and Prevention in Action slogan formed the basis for
a new vision to act in respons...
Forms of violence addressed
“The CI helped a girl in her area who was being beaten by her boyfriend. She
phoned the police...
Approaches to prevention
“This man always beats his wife and sometimes locks her outside at
night. After this had happened...
Outcomes of actions
• Most actions lead to resolution of conflict
• About a quarter of responses involve police involvemen...
Violence Free Zones
• Working with PCI and the two networks, the idea emerged for
Violence Free Zones in geographically de...
• Community
Engagers (CEs)
• Community
Influencers (CIs)
identified by CEs
• Prevention in
Action Groups
(PAGs)
• Multi-se...
Empowerment & social change
INTERNALIZED MEANING
I can act to prevent VAW
ACTIONS & COMMITMENTS
I am committed to taking a...
Conclusions and implications
• The PIA program’s multi-phase adaptive and experimental
approach has led to a model for com...
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Health Sector Approaches to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence_Carolyn Kruger_5.7.14

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Health Sector Approaches to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence_Carolyn Kruger_5.7.14

  1. 1. PREVENTION IN ACTION Lessons Learned and a Model for Social Mobilization to Address Violence Against Women in South Africa Carolyn Kruger, Ph.D. CORE Group Spring Meeting 2014 May 7, 2014
  2. 2. • Program led by Project Concern International (PCI) and the KwaZulu- Natal and Western Cape networks on VAW • A baseline survey in 2009 found that the vast majority of people rejected attitudinal statements supporting VAW, but the problem continued as a product of silence, fear and inaction • The direction of the program was reoriented from addressing ‘social norms’ to focus on transforming inaction into action to address VAW at community level Prevention in Action Program Design
  3. 3. Emerging program design • The new logo and Prevention in Action slogan formed the basis for a new vision to act in response to VAW • Agreements to support the program were established with sector partners including government departments, police services, faith- based organizations, community and non-governmental organizations • A core group called Community Engagers (CEs) were trained in VAW prevention • CEs then identified opinion leaders in communities who were drawn in as volunteers to mobilize action in response to VAW • This group of Community Influencers (CIs) received training and a toolkit of communication resources including badges, stickers, posters and guidelines on VAW prevention • Community-level response was strengthened through CIs establishing Prevention in Action Groups (PAGs)
  4. 4. Forms of violence addressed “The CI helped a girl in her area who was being beaten by her boyfriend. She phoned the police who responded and arrested the man. He was released the following day. The group felt that his actions still need to be condemned. They introduced themselves as PIA members and their role as a PIA Group in the community. They told the man that his actions towards his partner will not be tolerated and next time he beat his wife, they would make sure he stays behind bars. The embarrassed man apologized and promised not to ever lay a hand on his partner again, and he hasn’t.” (PIA Member, Khayelitsha). 59% 9% 15% 7% 5% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Male to Female Partner Male to Female Sexual Violence Other Violence Parent or Carer to Child Female to Male Partner Child to Parent or Grandparent
  5. 5. Approaches to prevention “This man always beats his wife and sometimes locks her outside at night. After this had happened for a while the CI organized her PAG members to come and talk to this man about his conduct. He welcomed the group and listened to what they were saying as well as being informed about PIA. He confessed that abuse is his problem. The CI then arranged that he sees counselors at FAMSA, which he did and their situation is much better than before” (PIA Member, eThekwini District) 24% 23% 20% 15% 11% 8% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Police or Legal involvement Discussion with Victim and Perpetrator Discussion with Victim Only Referral for Counselling / Support Discussion with Perpetrator Only Interruption of violence
  6. 6. Outcomes of actions • Most actions lead to resolution of conflict • About a quarter of responses involve police involvement or legal processes 48% 24% 14% 9% 6% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Resolution of Conflict Arrest, Interdict or Protection Order Resolution through Counselling Outcome Unclear Improved Community Safety
  7. 7. Violence Free Zones • Working with PCI and the two networks, the idea emerged for Violence Free Zones in geographically defined sub-areas within communities • Supported with a Violence Free Zone toolkit, communities are demarcated with signs, symbols and colors of PIA, public spaces are cleaned up, and household visits are conducted • Residents are encouraged to sign manifesto’s of commitment to ending violence in their communities and place stickers on their doors to symbolize that their homes are violence free
  8. 8. • Community Engagers (CEs) • Community Influencers (CIs) identified by CEs • Prevention in Action Groups (PAGs) • Multi-session training of CEs • CEs train CIs • CIs share concepts and strategies with PAGs • Capacity support to partners • Logo, slogan, co re materials • Branded items for PIA members • Amplification of actions through booklets, events, news media and social media • Baseline and formative research • Participatory research • Monitoring • Evaluation PIA Intervention Model
  9. 9. Empowerment & social change INTERNALIZED MEANING I can act to prevent VAW ACTIONS & COMMITMENTS I am committed to taking action to prevent VAW I have taken action to prevent VAW NEW LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL PRACTICES TO PREVENT VAW Change concepts made visible and sustained through symbols, language and actions CONCEPTUAL RESONANCE I understand the PIA concept SITUATIONAL RESONANCE The PIA concept is relevant to my situation SOCIAL RESONANCE The PIA concept is relevant to my community
  10. 10. Conclusions and implications • The PIA program’s multi-phase adaptive and experimental approach has led to a model for community mobilization to address violence against women • A strong emphasis on understanding and drawing in the lived experiences and leadership perspectives of PIA participants and community members strengthened model development • Partnerships with sector organizations provided support to program development. • Partnerships led by PIA Committees have reshaped community values and led to sustainable approaches to VAW prevention • The emerging model for community mobilization has potential for replication in other communities facing pressing challenges of VAW and other forms of violence

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