Integrating Agriculture and Nutrition_Ladd and Ruth Campbell_5.7.14

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  • Thanks, Kathryn. Good afternoon. For the next 90 mins, we want to look at the integration of nutrition and agriculture. (I’m telling you that, so that if you’re in the wrong room, you can sneak out now!) Specifically, I want to talk about agricultural value chain development, and how that can be used to contribute to nutrition objectives.
  • Traditionally, value chain projects have not focused on nutrition. The goal has been to increase the incomes of productive populations—usually smallholder farmers producing a marketable surplus. And to do so in a way that uses market forces to drive the process and is therefore sustainable. These projects can have a positive impact on food security by increasing incomes of the productive poor and therebyimproving access to food; and by increasing productivity and market links, thereby increasing food availability. But generally, VC projects have not had an explicit food security goal. Nor have they generally been very effective at integrating the very poor (subsistence farmers and landless laborers) into value chains.Separate from these projects, donors have long funded food security projects that have worked with very vulnerable populations to improve nutrition and food security.So as we can see, there has often times been something of a disconnect between these two types of project. Different goals, different target populations, and different time-horizons (long-term sustainability versus more immediate needs).But what we have seen in recent years and are increasingly seeing is that we are being asked by donors to use the VC approach to address FS and nutrition. There is a convergence: we are nowaiming to sustainably increase incomes and reduce poverty while improving nutrition and food security. SoVC approach has beenevolving in recent years in response to this challenge and we are going to look at some of those changes in just a moment.
  • But why does it matter? Why do we need this convergence? Evidence shows that nutrition-specific activities alone are not sufficient to address malnutrition.According to IFPRI, scaling up 10 key nutrition-specific activities to 90% of the population would only lead to a 20% reduction in malnutrition. At the same time, we know that just increasing incomes is also not enough—doesn’t automatically lead to improved nutrition (can increase malnutrition)So a cross-sector approach is needed to implement nutrition-sensitive programming that brings together expertise in both economic growth and nutrition.The value chain approach has been the principal approach to economic growth in the agricultural sector and beyond for the past decade, so we want to take this opportunity to provide more background on what the VC approach is, to help promote this convergence and empower nutrition-sensitive agricultural development.Source: IFPRI’s Lancet papers
  • So now we are going to look in a little more detail at the value chain approach. First, what is a value chain?A value chain is simply the series of actors and activities needed to bring a product from conception to the final consumer. Value chains can be long, extending from a rural area in one country to a global market in another. Value chains can also be short, stretching from one village to a neighboring town.
  • This is a relatively simple and clear graphic that tries to describe what is happening in one value chain. But of course, Peter doesn’t just work in one value chain. He may grow avocadoes, but he probably also has maize, beans, involved in some off-farm activities. Good, necessary—spread risk, smooth income. VC approach doesn’t say he should just work in one value chain—just tries to describe what is happening in each value chain.So that’s a value chain – but what is meant by “a value chain approach”?
  • Set of operating principles and practical tools for achieving economic growth that reduces poverty. Value chain approach does that by integrating large numbers of small firms and farmers into increasingly competitive, growing industries (or value chains). So this approach to improving livelihoods and incomes looks at the markets that the poor do or could participate in and helps them maximize their benefits from that participation.
  • Sometimes people get confused between the value chain approach and value chain analysis. The value chain approach is not just an analysis at the beginning, it is a dynamic and iterative process that is woven through all stages of project design and implementation.And it is an approach that has evolved over the yearsand continues to evolve as we learn more from implementation and as our needs changes. To make more sense of the value chain approach, let’s take a look at five key principles that drive the approach.
  • I will give a very short overview of AMDe and the 6 crops we are working in. An overview (really just list) of areas and target beneficiaries we are reaching with nutrition integration and then spend a couple minutes talking about the key advantages of our module and how we are rolling out.
  • Key differences than other modules
  • Integrating Agriculture and Nutrition_Ladd and Ruth Campbell_5.7.14

    1. 1. Integrating Agriculture and Nutrition: Understanding Value Chains and Intersectoral Coordination in Practice Ruth Campbell Ladd CORE Group Spring 2014 Practitioners Meeting May 7, 2014
    2. 2. Value Chain Projects and Food Security Projects Reaching vulnerable populations with market-based approaches Goal to improve nutrition & food security Target vulnerable populations Focus on immediate needs Food Security Projects Goal to increase incomes Target productive populations Long-term focus Value Chain Projects
    3. 3. Why It Matters • Nutrition-specific activities alone are insufficient – Scaling up 10 key nutrition-specific activities to 90% of the population would only lead to a 20% reduction in malnutrition (IFPRI) • Increasing incomes alone is insufficient
    4. 4. The series of actors and activities needed to bring a product or service from conception to the final consumer. What is a Value Chain?
    5. 5. Global Business Enabling Environment National Business Enabling Environment Global RetailersGlobal Retailers National Retailers Wholesalers Local Retailers Input Suppliers ProducerProducer Producer Processors Traders Exporters Cross-cutting Providers Financial Service Providers Sector-specific Providers What is a Value Chain?
    6. 6. Global Enabling Environment National Enabling Environment Input Suppliers Producers Wholesalers Exporters National Retailers Processors/Traders Global Retailers Financial (cross cutting) Sector specific providers Cross-cutting providers What is a Value Chain?
    7. 7. Set of principles and tools designed to drive economic growth that reduces poverty through the integration of large numbers of small firms, farmers and laborers into increasingly competitive value chains What is the Value Chain Approach?
    8. 8. Analysis Project Design Implementation Monitoring & Evaluation Learning What is the Value Chain Approach?
    9. 9. Global Enabling Environment National Enabling Environment Financial (cross cutting) Input Suppliers Sector specific providers Cross-cutting providers Producers Wholesalers Exporters National Retailers Processors/Traders Global Retailers Situate interventions within the context, and with an understanding, of the market systems as a whole 1. Take a Market Systems Perspective
    10. 10. • Whether local, regional or international, markets provide the opportunities and set the parameters for economic growth 2. Understand End Markets
    11. 11. • Cooperation to respond to market demand • Trust to enable market efficiency • Healthy competition to drive innovation 3. Focus on Incentives and Relationships
    12. 12. Upgrading = investments to increase competitiveness • New technologies • Improved skills • Better services • Grades and standards • Branding & marketing Firm-level Industry-level 4. Facilitate Upgrading
    13. 13. Global Enabling Environment Financial Service Providers Sector-specific Providers Cross-cutting Providers Exporters National Retailers Wholesalers Global Retailers Input Suppliers IMPLEMENTER IMPLEMENTER Facilitation = stimulating changes in a market system without taking a direct role in the system P r o d u c e r s Traders 4. Facilitate Upgrading
    14. 14. Global Enabling Environment Financial Service Providers Sector-specific Providers Cross-cutting Providers Exporters National Retailers Wholesalers Global Retailers Input Suppliers IMPLEMENTER Sector-specific Providers P r o d u c e r s Traders 4. Facilitate Upgrading Facilitation = stimulating changes in a market system without taking a direct role in the system
    15. 15. 5. Learn as You Go • Behavior change can be unpredictable
    16. 16. Value Chain Approach Key Principles 1. Take a market systems perspective 2. Understand end markets 3. Focus on relationships and upgrading 4. Facilitate upgrading 5. Learn as you go Resources www.microlinks.org www.acdivoca.org/valuechains
    17. 17. Pathways between Agriculture and Nutrition • Increased Income – Income – Food Prices – Allocation of Incomes Adapted from: Stuart Gillespie, Jody Harris, and Suneetha Kadiyala, 2012 The Agriculture-Nutrition Disconnect in India, What Do We Know? IFPRI Discussion Paper 01187
    18. 18. • Increased Production – On-farm Production Adapted from: Stuart Gillespie, Jody Harris, and Suneetha Kadiyala, 2012 The Agriculture-Nutrition Disconnect in India, What Do We Know? IFPRI Discussion Paper 01187 Pathways between Agriculture and Nutrition
    19. 19. • Women’s Empowerment – Women’s Nutritional Status – Women’s Childcare Management – Women’s Economic Status Adapted from: Stuart Gillespie, Jody Harris, and Suneetha Kadiyala, 2012 The Agriculture-Nutrition Disconnect in India, What Do We Know? IFPRI Discussion Paper 01187 Pathways between Agriculture and Nutrition
    20. 20. • Post Harvest Handling and Storage – Preservation of Nutrients – Prevention of Diseases – Fortification Adapted from: Stuart Gillespie, Jody Harris, and Suneetha Kadiyala, 2012 The Agriculture-Nutrition Disconnect in India, What Do We Know? IFPRI Discussion Paper 01187 Pathways between Agriculture and Nutrition
    21. 21. Ethiopia AGP-AMDe Agricultural Growth Program—Agribusiness & Marketing Development (AGP-AMDe) AGP-AMDe’s value chain approach is designed to: • Strengthen the competitiveness of six value chains • Increase access to finance • Improve the enabling environment • Expand public-private partnership investments • Reaching 1.3 million farmers
    22. 22. Ethiopia AGP-AMDe 6 Value Chains • Coffee • Honey • Sesame Seed • Maize • Wheat • Chickpea
    23. 23. • Challenges to Integration – Selected Crops – Target Beneficiaries – Scale – M&E of Behavior Change Ethiopia AGP-AMDe
    24. 24. Overview of Nutrition Integration Activities • Nutri-SAT • Sell More For More - Nutrition Module • Wheat flour fortification Ethiopia AGP-AMDe
    25. 25. Sell More For More Nutrition Module – Cascade training • Using TOT through Farmer Cooperative Unions • Targeted at farmers • 38,000 Farmers (800,000) – Appropriate learning analogies for farmers – M&E – nutrition behavior change AGP-AMDe
    26. 26. Visit us at www.acdivoca.org www.facebook.com/acdivoca @acdivoca

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