Colorado lgbt data scan final 10 14-11

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Colorado lgbt data scan final 10 14-11

  1. 1. DATA SCAN: THE HEALTH OF THE LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER COMMUNITIES IN COLORADOIndira Gujral, PhDColorado Department of Public Health and EnvironmentData Partner: ONE ColoradoSeptember 8, 2011
  2. 2. Table of Contents Elevating LGBT health in the United States Overview of Survey Sampling Health of LGBQ Youth: data from the 2009 Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey Health of LGB Adults: data from the Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2006 – 2009) HIV or AIDS: state surveillance Filling In the Gaps: Data from A Conversation with Coloradans (One Colorado Education Fund’s Needs Assessment) Contacts and Resources
  3. 3. ELEVATING LGBT HEALTH INTHE UNITED STATES
  4. 4. Elevating LGBT Health in the U.S. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommended 14 actions to improve the health and well-being of the LGBT communities. 5 Examples of Recommended Actions:  Healthy People 2020  The Affordable Care Act  Anti-Bullying Efforts  Improvements in Foster and Adoptive Care  Runaway and Homeless Youth Services
  5. 5. Elevating LGBT Health in the U.S. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Recommended 6 Future Actions (2011). Example of 2 Future Recommended Actions:  LGBT Cultural Competency Curricula  Increase the number of federally funded surveys collecting data on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (starts 2013)
  6. 6. Lots to Celebrate, Still Work to Do
  7. 7. Goals and Objectives The goal of this data scan is to provide a baseline of LGBT health in Colorado To accomplish this goal, we have 2 Objectives 1. Provide data from two population-based surveys assessing youth and adults  2009 Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey  Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2. Provide data from convenience-sample survey of adults  One Colorado Educational Fund’s Needs Assessment
  8. 8. OVERVIEW OF SURVEYSAMPLING
  9. 9. Overview: Population-based Sampling Population-based sampling is a probability sampling method which selects a subset of individuals from within a population to yield some knowledge about the whole population. Strengths of Population-based Sampling  Cost: cheaper to sample group than whole population  Time: data collection is faster  Extrapolation: can generalize results to whole population  Boulder County YRBS (generalize results about Boulder Youth)  Colorado BRFSS (generalize results about Colorado adults) Weakness of Population-based Sampling  Accuracy: for small populations, need to aggregate years  Story: does not tell a full story
  10. 10. Overview: Convenience Sampling Convenience sampling is a type of non-probability sampling in which the sample is drawn from a population because the sample is readily available and convenient. Strengths of Convenience Sampling  Cost: cheaper than probability sampling  Time: data collection is very fast  Small and difficult to reach populations  One Colorado Education Fund’s Needs Assessment (LGBT community)  Provides insight for new questions to be asked on population-based surveys Weaknesses of Convenience Sampling  Extrapolation: can NOT generalize results to whole population
  11. 11. THE HEALTH OF LGBQ YOUTH IN BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADOYouth Risk Behavior SurveyBoulder County Health Public HealthNovember, 2009
  12. 12. Methods: 2009 Boulder County YRBS2009 Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey US Youth Risk Behaviors Survey  Purpose is to monitor health risk behaviors (not assets)  Data collected from randomly sampled schools and classrooms across the United States every other year  Does NOT collect sexual orientation Boulder County YRBS does collect sexual orientation (county adds the question)
  13. 13. Methods: 2009 Boulder County YRBSBoulder County YRBS Administered in 18 high schools 9 high schools in Boulder County School District  9 high schools in St. Vrain Valley School District 108 questions (including sexual orientation) 2,491 high school students Sexual Orientation Status  Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Questioning (LGBQ) Excludes Gender Identity
  14. 14. Results: 2009 Boulder County YRBSResults by Topic Area  Demographics  Family and Community Service  Injury  Safety and Harassment  School Safety  Sexual Assault and Dating Violence  Depression  Suicide  Tobacco, Alcohol, and Marijuana  Weight Issues  Behaviors Influencing Weight  Physical Activity
  15. 15. Results: Demographics Sexual Orientation 9.3 LGBQ Heterosexual 90.7Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  16. 16. Results: Family and Community 100% 90% * 86% 80% 78% 77% * 70% 64% 60% 50% * 43% LBGQ 40% 38% Heterosexual 30% 20% 10% 0% Parents have 4 or more meals with Engaged in behavior standards family per week Community Service*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  17. 17. Results: Injury 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 75.2% 68.8% 67.1% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% LGBQ 40.0% * Heterosexual 31.6% 30.0% 24.6% 22.4% Colorado 20.0% * 10.0% 7.7% 7.6% 5.0% 0.0% Never/rarely wear Never/rarely wear Rode with Driver bicycle helmet seat belt who drank alcohol*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  18. 18. Results: Safety and Harassment 100.0% 90.8% 90.0% * 78.4% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% * LGBQ 40.0% * 29.8% 26.8% Heterosexual 30.0% 20.0% 12.9% 10.0% 3.9% 0.0% Felt Safe in Electronically Bullied Harassed because Neighborhood someone thought you were LGB*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  19. 19. Results: School Safety 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% LGBQ 40.0% Heterosexual * 30.0% Colorado * * 20.8% 20.0% 14.9% 14.1%16.7% 13.4% 10.0% 4.0% 5.1% 5.9% 8.0% 0.0% Did not go to school Threatened or Carried a weapon because felt unsafe injured on school property*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  20. 20. Results: Dating and Sexual Assault 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% LGBQ Heterosexual 40.0% * Colorado 30.0% * 20.8% * 20.0% 13.8% 9.1% 10.7% 10.0% 6.4% 7.7% 4.4% 2.4% 4.6% 0.0% Hurt by Forced to have sexual First sex < age 13 girlfriend/boyfriend intercourse*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  21. 21. Results: Depression 100.0% 90.0% 81.6% 80.0% * 72.9% 70.0% 60.0% * 52.2% 51.6% 50.0% LGBQ Heterosexual 40.0% * 29.3% Colorado 30.0% 25.4% 22.3% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Felt sad/hopeless Has someone to talk Gets help when sad*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  22. 22. Results: Suicide 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% LGBQ * * Heterosexual 40.0% 35.3% 28.9% Colorado 30.0% * 20.3% 20.0% 13.7% 11.1% 9.2%11.0% 10.0% 7.6% 4.2% 0.0% Seriously considered Planned suicide Attempted suicide*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  23. 23. Results: Tobacco, Alcohol, Marijuana 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% * 52.3% 50.0% LGBQ * 41.8% 39.0% 40.8% Heterosexual 40.0% Colorado 30.0% 24.3%24.9% * 20.3% 20.0% 10.0% 7.6% 4.2% 0.0% Current tobacco use Current alcohol use Current marijuana use*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  24. 24. Results: Weight Issues 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 73.9% 70.0% * 58.9% 60.0% * 50.0% 47.7% LGBQ 37.8%38.6% Heterosexual 40.0% Colorado 30.0% 20.0% * 11.8% 10.0% 5.1% 7.1% 0.0% Obese Trying to lose Vigorous physical activity*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  25. 25. Results: Behaviors Influencing Weight 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% LGBQ 40.7% Heterosexual 40.0% * 30.1% Colorado 30.0% 23.1% 25.1% 19.8% 20.0% * 10.1% 10.0% 3.0% 3.6% 0.0% Vomited/Laxatives Sleep ≥ 8 hours ≥ 3 hours tv/comp*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2009, Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey; Boulder County Health Department.
  26. 26. THE HEALTH OF LGB ADULTS IN COLORADOBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemColorado Department of Public Health and Environment2006 – 2009
  27. 27. BackgroundAccording to the Williams Institute atUCLA School of Law, it is estimated thatmore than 186,000 LGBT individualslive in Colorado, including 12,000transgender people.
  28. 28. Background: LGBT HealthColorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2006 – 2009) Very few federal and state health surveillance surveys include measures of respondents’ sexual orientation Research from non-population-based surveys provides evidence of health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations Healthy People 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Institute of Medicine, and others call for increased efforts to study and to improve LGBT health
  29. 29. Background: Sexual Orientation andthe BRFSSColorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2006 – 2009) Few states have added sexual orientation to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) Recently published results from Massachusetts and Washington provide evidence of LGBT health disparities  Conron et al., AJPH, October 2010  Dilley et al., AJPH, March 2010 Colorado added sexual orientation to its BRFSS in 2006
  30. 30. Methods: Colorado’s BRFSS QuestionColorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2006 – 2009)“Research has shown that some sexual minority community members have important health risk factors. We are collecting information about sexual orientation to learn whether this is true in Colorado. Do You consider yourself to be: Heterosexual, that is, straight; Homosexual, that is, gay or lesbian; Bisexual, or something else? Survey Does NOT measure Gender Identity
  31. 31. Results: Demographics of BRFSS Respondents 0.9% 0.1% 1.3% Sexual Orientation Homosexual Heterosexual Bisexual Other 97.7%Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  32. 32. Demographics of Respondents: Age 100.0% 90.0% 79.3% 80.0% 70.0% 63.2% 60.0% 52.8% Homosexual 50.0% Bisexual 40.0% 37.4% Heterosexual 30.0% 24.3% 20.0% 16.4% 12.5% 9.8% 10.0% 4.4% 0.0% 18-34 35-49 50+Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  33. 33. Demographics of Respondents: Urban/Rural 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 65.1%63.2% 60.0% 51.5% Homosexual 50.0% Bisexual 40.0% Heterosexual 30.2% 30.0% 24.6%22.8% 18.3% 20.0% 13.7% 10.4% 10.0% 0.0% Denver Metro Other Urban RuralSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  34. 34. Demographics of Respondents: Race/Ethnicity100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 76.0% 75.0% 70.2% 70.0% 60.0% Homosexual 50.0% Bisexual 40.0% Heterosexual 30.0% 19.5%17.8% 20.0% 13.6% 10.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.3% 2.5% 3.4% 3.4% 3.7% 1.2% 1.4% 0.0% White Black Hispanic Other MultiracialSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  35. 35. Demographics of Respondents: Educational Attainment 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 74.3% 70.0% 67.2% 59.3% 60.0% 50.0% Homosexual 40.0% Bisexual 29.1% Heterosexual 30.0% 24.0% 21.7% 20.0% 11.6% 8.7% 10.0% 4.0% 0.0% Did not complete High School Some College High School GraduateSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  36. 36. Demographics of Respondents: Poverty 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 73.1% 74.1% 70.0% 60.0% 54.6% Homosexual 50.0% 45.4% Bisexual 40.0% Heterosexual 30.0% 26.9% 25.9% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Below 200% FPL Above 200% FPLSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  37. 37. Demographics of Respondents: Marital Status 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 65.3% 60.0% 47.7% Homosexual 50.0% 46.2% 40.0% Bisexual 34.4% 29.2% Heterosexual 30.0% 20.0% 14.6% 16.0% 13.4% 8.6% 10.8% 9.7% 10.0% 4.2% 0.0% Married Formerly Never Married Unmarried Married CoupleSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  38. 38. Demographics of Respondents: Children in Household 100.0% 90.0% 82.9% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 54.1% 52.1% Homosexual 50.0% 47.9% 45.9% Bisexual 40.0% Heterosexual 30.0% 20.0% 17.1% 10.0% 0.0% Yes NoSource: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  39. 39. Results: Demographic Summary Variable Significant Not Significant Age X Rural Residency X Race/Ethnicity X Education X Poverty X Marital Status X Children in Household X*Statistically Significant Difference between LGBQ and Heterosexual (p<0.05) Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Departmentof Public Health & Environment.
  40. 40. What is the prevalence of healthconditions and behaviors amongColorado’s LGB population?
  41. 41. Results: General Health 12.0% Fair or Poor General Health 14.4% 9.6% 17.8% Heterosexual Some Physical Disability 30.1% * Bisexual 20.9% Homosexual 50.10% Dont Always Get Needed Emotional 71.40% Support 57.20%*Statistically Significant Difference compared to Heterosexual (p<0.05)Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  42. 42. Results: Health Services and Screenings 16.6% No Health Insurance 31.3% * 14.2% 20.7%No Regular Primary Care Provider 26.0% 24.5% Heterosexual 61.8% Never had an HIV test 37.4% Bisexual 29.7% * Homosexual 60.2% Did Not Get Flu Shot 71.6% * 60.2% 76.7% Did Not Get Pneumonia Vaccine 78.4% 74.3%*Statistically Significant Difference compared to Heterosexual (p<0.05)Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  43. 43. Results: Risk Behaviors 6.70% Dont Always Use a Seatbelt 5.80% 8.80% 17.2% Physically Inactive 20.2% 12.4% * 16.4% Heterosexual Binge Drink 28.2%* Bisexual 25.0%* Homosexual 17.3% Current Smokers 35.4%* 34.1%* 74.9%Insufficient Fruits and Vegetables 73.1% 75.5%*Statistically Significant Difference compared to Heterosexual (p<0.05)Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  44. 44. Results: Chronic DiseaseDiagnosed Heart Disease or Angina 4.5% 2.5% Diagnosed with Diabetes 3.2% 3.4% Current Asthma 13.8% Heterosexual 14.3% * Bisexual 21.3% Homosexual Diagnosed Hypertension 20.8% 22.3% High Cholesterol 34.5% 32.3% 55.90% Overweight or Obese 50.50% 48.90%*Statistically Significant Difference compared to Heterosexual (p<0.05)Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department ofPublic Health & Environment.
  45. 45. Results: Homosexual Respondents Diagnosed Heart Disease or Angina 2.5% Diagnosed with Diabetes 3.4% Dont Always Use a Seatbelt 8.80% Fair or Poor General Health 9.6% Drinking and Driving 9.80% Physically Inactive 12.4% No Health Insurance 14.2% Current Asthma 14.3% Some Physical Disability 20.9% Diagnosed Hypertension 22.3% No Regular Primary Care Provider 24.5% Binge Drink 25.0% Never had an HIV test 29.7% High Cholesterol 32.3% Current Smokers 34.1% Overweight or Obese 48.90%Dont Always Get Needed Emotional Support 57.20% Did Not Get Flu Shot 60.2% Did Not Get Pneumonia Vaccine 74.3% Insufficient Fruits and Vegetables 75.5% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0%Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  46. 46. Results: Bisexual Respondents Diagnosed Heart Disease or Angina 4.5% Diagnosed with Diabetes 3.2% Dont Always Use a Seatbelt 5.80% Fair or Poor General Health 14.4% Drinking and Driving 2.10% Physically Inactive 20.2% No Health Insurance 31.3% Current Asthma 13.8% Some Physical Disability 30.1% Diagnosed Hypertension 20.8% No Regular Primary Care Provider 26.0% Binge Drink 28.2% Never had an HIV test 37.4% High Cholesterol 34.5% Current Smokers 35.4% Overweight or Obese 50.50%Dont Always Get Needed Emotional Support 71.40% Did Not Get Flu Shot 71.6% Did Not Get Pneumonia Vaccine 78.4% Insufficient Fruits and Vegetables 73.1% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  47. 47. Results: Heterosexual Respondents Diagnosed Heart Disease or Angina 2.7% Diagnosed with Diabetes 5.5% Dont Always Use a Seatbelt 6.70% Fair or Poor General Health 12.0% Drinking and Driving 4.10% Physically Inactive 17.2% No Health Insurance 16.6% Current Asthma 7.9% Some Physical Disability 17.8% Diagnosed Hypertension 21.3% No Regular Primary Care Provider 20.7% Binge Drink 16.4% Never had an HIV test 61.8% High Cholesterol 34.3% Current Smokers 17.3% Overweight or Obese 55.90%Dont Always Get Needed Emotional Support 50.10% Did Not Get Flu Shot 60.2% Did Not Get Pneumonia Vaccine 76.7% Insufficient Fruits and Vegetables 74.9% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  48. 48. Results: Summary Diagnosed Heart Disease or… Diagnosed with Diabetes Dont Always Use a Seatbelt Fair or Poor General Health Drinking and Driving Physically Inactive No Health Insurance Current Asthma Some Physical Disability Diagnosed Hypertension Heterosexual Bisexual No Regular Primary Care… Homosexual Binge Drink Never had an HIV test High Cholesterol Current Smokers Overweight or Obese Dont Always Get Needed… Did Not Get Flu Shot Did Not Get Pneumonia VaccineInsufficient Fruits and Vegetables 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%Source: 2006 – 2009, Colorado Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  49. 49. Conclusions Disparities in health behaviors and health conditions do exist between Colorado’s heterosexual and LGB populations LGB populations are not homogenous The prevalence of health behaviors and health outcomes varies within the LGB population
  50. 50. Limitations and Future Opportunities No data on transgender Coloradans No statewide data on LGBT youth Insufficient sample size to conduct analysis of rotating core and state added BRFSS questions by sexual orientation
  51. 51. HIV OR AIDSColorado HIV Surveillance ReportColorado Department of Public Health and Environment4th Quarter, 2010
  52. 52. Background: HIV or AIDS In Colorado, physicians, health care providers, hospitals, or any other person providing testing and/or counseling or treatment to a person with HIV infection are required by law to report HIV and AIDS related information to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, or local health department. Laboratories must report tests that indicate HIV infection.
  53. 53. Overview: HIV or AIDS in Colorado The first case of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed in 1982. Between 1982 and 2010, nearly 16,600 people have been diagnosed with HIV disease in Colorado. Between 2006 and 2010, new HIV diagnoses averaged 430 per year. Between 2006 and 2010, HIV/AIDS deaths averaged 103 per year. Since highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) became widely available in 1996, both AIDS diagnoses and HIV/AIDS related deaths have declined significantly.
  54. 54. New Cases of HIV by year, Colorado 350 302 300 279 Number of New HIV Cases 256 249 249 250 200 150 Male-male sex Heterosexual contact 100 72 76 64 52 48 50 0 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 YearSource: 4th Quarter, 2010, Colorado HIV Surveillance Report; Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  55. 55. Racial/ethnic categories of individuals living with HIV due to male-male sex exposure, December 31, 2010 Percent 0.5% 0.7% 0.7% White 16.0% Black Hispanic 9.0% Asian/Pacific Islander American 73.0% Indian/Alaska Native Multiple/UnknownSource: 4th Quarter, 2010, Colorado HIV Surveillance Report; Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment.
  56. 56. FILLING IN THE DATA GAPS: THE HEALTH OF LGBT ADULTS IN COLORADOOne Colorado Education Fund’s Needs AssessmentONE Colorado2010
  57. 57. Methods: 2010 Conversation with ColoradansOne Colorado Education Fund’s Needs Assessment (AKA Needs Assessment)  Purpose: start a dialogue about issues affecting LGBT people in Colorado  Online or print survey of over 4,600 respondents  Strength: sample size and inclusion of transgender people  Weakness: not population-based; cannot generalize to the entire state
  58. 58. Results: 2010 Conversation with Coloradans One Colorado Education Fund’s Needs AssessmentResults by Topic Area  Demographics  Housing Discrimination  Employment Discrimination  Spirituality  Philanthropy  Top 5 Most Important Social Services
  59. 59. Health Equity Health Begins Where You Live, Learn, Work and Play NATIONAL INFLUENCES GOVERNMENT POLICIES U.S. CULTURE & CULTURAL NORMS + = SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH POPULATIONLIFE COURSE HEALTH FACTORS OUTCOMES ACCESS , HEALTH PREGNANCY ECONOMIC PHYSICAL SOCIAL MENTAL UTILIZATION BEHAVIORS & HEALTH & QUALITY QUALITY OF LIFE OPPORTUNITY ENVIRONMENT FACTORS CONDITIONS CARE EARLY • Nutrition • Mental health • Health MORBIDITY CHILDHOOD • Income Built • Participation Environment • Physical status insurance • Employment • Social • Education •Recreation support activity • Stress coverage MORTALITY •Food • Tobacco use • Substance • Received CHILDHOOD • Housing • Leadership abuse needed care •Transportation • Political • Skin Cancer LIFE EXPECTANCY • Injury • Functional • Provider influence Environmental status availability • Organization • Oral health ADOLESCENCE quality • Preventive al networks • Sexual health •Housing care • Violence •Water • Racism • Obesity ADULTHOOD •Air • Cholesterol Safety • High Blood PressureOLDER ADULTSPublic Health’s Role in Addressing the Social Determinants of Health•Advocating for and defining public policy to achieve health equity •Data collection, monitoring and surveillance•Coordinated interagency efforts •Population based interventions to address health factors•Creating organizational environments that enable change •Community engagement and capacity building Colorado Department of Public Health - Social Determinants of Health Workgroup
  60. 60. Demographics: Sexual Orientation Respondents 2% 1% 5% 9% Bisexual Lesbian 29% Gay Queer Chose not to label 54% Self-IdentifySource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  61. 61. Demographics: Gender Identity Respondents 3% 1% 39% Female Male Transgender/Transsexual Self-Identify 57%Source: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  62. 62. Demographics: Gender Identity Transgender People 13% 26% Female to Male Male to Female Self-Identify 61%Source: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  63. 63. Demographics: Age Age Group 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 25% 24% 22% 20% 15% 12% 10% 3% 0% 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 or olderSource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  64. 64. Housing Discrimination Report Being Denied Housing 100% 90% 87% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 5% 7% 4% 2% 0% No one Attorney Colorado Civil Police Other Rights Commission Six (6) percent of respondents reported being denied housing due to sexual orientation or sexual identitySource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  65. 65. Employment Discrimination Report Employment Discrimination 100% 90% 80% 72% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 22% 20% 7% 9% 10% 3% 3% 0% 0% No one Human Attorney Colorado Police School Other Resources Civil Rights Official Commission Twenty-seven (27) percent of respondents experienced employment discrimination due to sexual orientation or sexual identitySource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  66. 66. Spirituality: Attending religious service 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% LGBT 41% 40% Transgender Only 31% 30% 23%23% 20% 17% 15%15% 12%14% 9% 10% 0% 1 or more 1-3 Few times/yr 1 time/yr Never times/wk times/mthSource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  67. 67. Philanthropy: Contributing to Charity 100% 90% 80% 70% 62% 60% 58% 50% LGBT 40% Transgender Only 30% 20% 16% 14% 15% 10% 10% 8% 10% 4% 3% 0% $0 $1-499 $500-999 $1,000-4,999 $5,000Source: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  68. 68. Top 5 Most Important Social Services100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% LGBT 40% 34% 30% 20% 10% 9% 8% 10% 0% Ensuring school safety for LGBT Access to LGBT-welcoming health Increasing services for people living Ensuring parents have information youth care w/ HIV/AIDS for supporting LGBT youthSource: 2010, Needs Assessment; One Colorado.
  69. 69. DATA CONTACTS & RESOURCES
  70. 70. Data Contacts Indira Gujral, MS PhD, Epidemiologist, CDPHE  Indira.Gujral@state.co.us Kyle Legleiter, MPH, Program Director, CDPHE  Kyle.Legleiter@state.co.us Fran Simon, Simon Analytics  Simonanalytics@gmail.com Kieu Vu, MSPH, BRFSS Coordinator, CDPHE  Kieu.Vu@state.co.us
  71. 71. Resources The Affordable Care Act and the LGBT Community: http://lgbthealth.webolutionary.com/sites/default/files/ACA%20final.pdf The Affordable Care Act and LGBT Americans: http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/new_options_for_lgbt_americans.html Boulder County Youth Risk Behavior Survey: http://www.bouldercounty.org/help/health/lgbtiq/pages/yrbsresultslinks.aspx Bullying: www.StopBullying.gov Colorado HIV Surveillance Report: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/dc/HIVandSTD/HIV_STDSurv/HIV.AIDS.Surv.rpt.4thQuarter.20 10.pdf One Colorado Needs Assessment: http://www.one-colorado.org/issues/2010-needs- assessment/ Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9 – 12 – Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance, Selected Sites, United States, 2001 – 2009: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss6007a1.htm Sexual Behavior, Sexual Attraction, and Sexual Identity in the United States: Data from the 2006 – 2008 National Survey of Family Growth: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr036.pdf U.S. Health and Human Services: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/lgbt/

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