9. closing ma training schools1

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CJCJ's Executive Director Daniel Macallair, is a practitioner-in-residence at San Francisco State University (SFSU)'s Department of Criminal Justice Studies. These slides are from his Intervention Policies in Juvenile Justice course materials.

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9. closing ma training schools1

  1. 1. The Closing of the Massachusetts Training Schools: Lessons Learned 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  2. 2. Institutional Reform: The Historical Pattern• Calls for juvenile institutional reform result from scandal• Public exposure results in public outcry• Commissions are appointed to study problems• Many months later, commission issues report with recommendations• Legislature appropriates funding for minor changes• Old practices and routines quickly resume 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  3. 3. Prelude to Reform in Massachusetts: Triggering Events• 1966-67 Reports by HEW Children’s Bureau, Massachusetts Committee on Children and Youth, and State Senate release critical reports on abuses in the Massachusetts Training Schools.• Gubernatorial Election of 1968• New Dept. of Youth Services created (August 1969)• Jerome Miller appointed Commissioner (October 1969) 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  4. 4. First Actions: Miller Attempts Conventional Approach to Institutional Reform• Fix the institutions• Lobby for more institutional resources• Expand institution-based resources• Maintain existing structure 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  5. 5. Next Actions: Miller Abandons Conventional Reform Strategies• Rejects congregate institutional care• Establishes a new vision for juvenile justice system services• Forges non-institutional alliances• Invites outside scrutiny of institutional realities• Lobbies policy makers for systemic change• Sets own timetable and initiates change process 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  6. 6. Strategies for Closing the Training Institutions• Target Institutional Populations• Regionalization• Purchase of Service from Private Agencies• Community-based programming 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  7. 7. Significance to national juvenile justice policy• Demonstrated that training schools were obsolete and could be closed• Demonstrated that an alternative system of primarily non- institutional interventions could be substituted for institutional confinement• Demonstrated the political challenges of closing training schools 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  8. 8. Obstacles to reforming juvenile justice• Limited Resources• Nonflexible budget• External Political climate• Union contracts and civil service restrictions• Lack of community alternatives• Staff resistance and sabotage 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013

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