8. the future of community corrections in california

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CJCJ's Executive Director Daniel Macallair, is a practitioner-in-residence at San Francisco State University (SFSU)'s Department of Criminal Justice Studies. These slides are from his Community Corrections and Sentencing course materials.

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8. the future of community corrections in california

  1. 1. THE FUTURE OF COMMUNITYCORRECTIONS IN CALIFORNIA Rapid Expansion 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  2. 2. COUNTY PRISON COMMITMENT RATESHighest Prison Prison Lowest Prison PrisonCommitting Counties Commitment Committing Commitment Rate Counties RateKings County 1145 San Francisco 110 CountyShasta County 744 Contra Costa 179 CountyButte County 689 Santa Cruz County 199Riverside County 584 Sonoma County 246 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  3. 3. REASONS FOR EXPANSION OF COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS• Budget crisis and shrinking public funds• New state policies for reducing prison population• Increased funding for probation services• Rediscovery of rehabilitation as a essential sentencing goal• Disillusionment with the failure of mass imprisonment 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  4. 4. RECENT LEGISLATION SUPPORTING COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS• California Community Corrections Performance Incentive Act (Senate Bill 678, 2009)• California Prison Realignment Law (Assembly Bill 109 & 117, 2011) 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  5. 5. SIGNIFICANCE OF SB 678• Recognizes the historic underfunding of adult probation and the connection between this lack of funding and poor outcomes for probationers• Establishes a mechanism to provide sustainable funding for adult probation 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  6. 6. PROVISIONS OF SENATE BILL 678• Provides incentive funding to counties• Promotes the creation of model county practices – often called (evidence-based practices)• Creates a community corrections partnership in each county chaired by the chief probation officer 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  7. 7. SENATE BILL 678 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTThere are four measures specified:The % of persons on felony probation who are being supervised inaccordance with EBPThe % of state moneys expended for programs that are evidence-based, and a descriptive list of all programs that are evidence-basedSpecification of supervision policies, procedures, programs, andpractices that were eliminatedThe % of persons on felony probation who successfully completethe period of probation 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  8. 8. THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE REALIGNMENT LAW(ASSEMBLY BILL 109 & 117) Effective October 1, 2011 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  9. 9. PROVISIONS OF REALIGNMENT LAW (AB 109)• People convicted of felonies with prison sentences of three years or less will serve sentences in county jails• Revocations for post release violations can be recommitted for no more than 180 days• County jail good time calculated at one for one• Counties can use home detention in lieu of jail• Counties provided with funding to expand community corrections services - estimated funding level in 2011‐12 is $354.3 million• Mandates creation of county community corrections partnerships• Creates Board of State and Community Corrections 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  10. 10. IMPACT OF AB 109• Rapid decline in prison population• Prison sentences declining to pre 1977 levels• Vast disparity in county responses• Leading to unprecedented expansion of community- based corrections• Created momentum for further reforms 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013

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