8. prison gangs

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CJCJ's Executive Director Daniel Macallair, is a practitioner-in-residence at San Francisco State University (SFSU)'s Department of Criminal Justice Studies. These slides are from his California Corrections System course materials.

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8. prison gangs

  1. 1. CaliforniaPrison Gangs40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  2. 2. California is the homeland for prison gangs• Most traditional prison gangs • Disrespect or feeling of disrespect is were developed in the California one of the main causes of conflict and Prison System attack.• Many prison gangs started as • When one race attacks another race street gangs there is always expected retaliation.• They are known for viciousness • Most gangs are involved in some sort and violence and use this of illegal activity in order to maintain reputation to maintain power and finances. control. • Drug trafficking, import/export, hit-man business, etc. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  3. 3. Characteristics of Prison Gang MembershipJuvenile Prisons Adult Prisons Gang membership stems from a  Gang memberships stems for a use for solidarity and protection. need to control contraband and The building of these groups underground economy involve racial and ethnic  Highly structured with formal rules recruitment and strict hierarchy Limited formal structure and rules  Race and ethnicity primary means of recruitment and solidarity The criminal enterprise inside  Engagement in more violent these facilities is minimal activities 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  4. 4. Prison Gang Subculture• Reputation• Respect• Retaliation 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  5. 5. The Traditional Five Aryan Brotherhood • These five gangs developed in the Black Guerilla Family California Corrections System during the La Neustria Familia 1960s and 70s . • The original purpose Mexican Mafia for their formation was protection. Texas Sydicates 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  6. 6. Aryan BrotherhoodFounded around 1967 at SanQuentin.Membership consists of onlywhite members, and they follow a“Blood in, Blood out” philosophy.Referred to as AB.Their associates are theMexican mafia, and Hells Angels.Their traditional enemies are theBlack Guerilla Family and the LaNuestra Familia. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  7. 7. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  8. 8. Black Guerilla Family Founded in the California prison system in 1966, by a former black panther member, George Jackson. Once called the Black Mafia, now known as BGF members are black inmates Their death oath requires a lifetime of loyalty They are also considered more politically oriented. Associates are the La Nuestra Familia and any other black gangs. Enemies are Aryan Brotherhood, Texas Syndicates, and the Mexican Mafia 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  9. 9. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  10. 10. La Nuestra Familia Originated in the mid 1960’s at California’s Soledad Prison. Members are of Hispanic decent, there is a “Blood in, Blood out” requirement. Developed to protect rural-Hispanic inmates from predator gangs. Associates are Black Guerilla Family. Enemies Texas Syndicates, Aryan Brotherhood, and Mexican Mafia(Main enemy). Also known as LNF. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  11. 11. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  12. 12. Mexican Mafia Originally a street gang in LA, formed in the California Department of Corrections in the late 1950’s at Deuel Vocational Institution. Oldest known prison gang. Also know as La Eme their primary goal is ethnic solidarity and drug- trafficking control. Consists of Mexican-Americans mainly. Allied with the Aryan Brotherhood. Enemies are Black Guerilla Family, and the La Nuestra Familia, their main rivals. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  13. 13. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  14. 14. Texas Syndicate Originated in the late 1970’s in California’s Folsom Prison. Formed in response to other prison gangs attempting to make prey out of native Texas inmates. Predominately Mexican-Americans. Associates are various smaller gangs Enemies consist of ALL the main gangs aside from the BGF. Also known as TS, and ESE TE. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  15. 15. 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.orgSan Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013
  16. 16. ReferencesFlorida Department of Corrections. Major Prison Gangs.Retrieved fromhttp://www.dc.state.fl.us/pub/gangs/prison2.htmlPrisons in California.(n.d.) Wikipedia Online.Retrieved fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prisons_in_CaliforniaWalker, Robert. (1999). Gangs Or Us. Prison Gangs.Retrieved from http://www.gangsorus.com/prisongangs.html 40 Boardman Place www.cjcj.org San Francisco, CA 94103 © Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice 2013

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