Psyf 540 master syllabus marzo 2010

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Psyf 540 master syllabus marzo 2010

  1. 1. CARLOS ALBIZU UNIVERSITYSAN JUAN CAMPUS<br />MASTER SYLLABUS<br />PSYF-540: LIFE-SPAN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT <br />CREDITS: 3CONTACT HOURS: 45<br />COURSE DESCRIPTION<br />The course will review theory and research in life span development. The students will review physiological, historical, socio-cultural, economic and psychological foundations of human development. Emphasis will be given to social, emotional and intellectual factors. Puerto Rican cultural factors in child rearing and development will be discussed. The topic of individual differences is emphasized throughout all units of the course also studied. This course will also help the student to develop the knowledge and skills to apply the concepts acquired during the course in their clinical and research practice as psychologists.<br />PRE-REQUISITES<br />NONE<br />COURSE OBJECTIVES<br />The principal objective of this course is the study of the major developmental theories, the status of research studies in this area, and the application of theory and research in clinical practice with emphasis in the Puerto Rican population. The student will know the meaning and scope of lifespan development according to current definitions. The student will learn the different theoretical premises and its basic principles in human development research. The students will learn the different stages of human development according to the major developmental theories. The student will learn the ethical considerations and research methodology in the study of development. The student will be able to apply the knowledge acquired in the course to the practice of psychology. The student will study cultural and ethnic differences influencing development. The students will also study gender differences through the life cycle.<br />REQUIRED TEXT BOOKS<br />Santrock, J. (2010). A Topical Approach to Lifespan Development. (5th Ed.). Boston: McGraw Hill.<br />ISBN: 13-9780073370934 McGraw Hill<br />Miller, P.H. (2009). Theories of Development Psychology, (5th Edition). Worth Publishers, New York. <br />ISBN: 1-4292-1634-4 Worth Publishers.com<br />ADDITIONAL REFERENCES<br />Bornstein, M.H., & Lamb, M.E. (2005). Development Science: An Advanced Textbook, 5th Edition. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah, NJ.<br />Austrian, S.G. (2002). Developmental Theories through the Lifecycle. Columbia <br />University Press, New York.<br />ITINERARY OF CLASS UNITS<br />Unit 1: Introduction to the psychological development through the <br />life cycle <br />Unit 2: The beginning of life: Genetics and prenatal development <br />Unit 3: Birth and the newborn<br />Unit 4:Infants: the first three years Physical and cognitive development <br />Unit 5: Infants: the first three years Social and personality development<br />Unit 6: Pre-school years (ages 3 to 6). Physical, cognitive and language development. Moral, social and personality development<br />Unit 7: Middle childhood (ages 7-12). Physical, cognitive, social and personality development. Development of the Self<br />Unit 8: Midterm exam<br />Unit 9: Adolescence (ages 13 to 19): Physical and cognitive development.<br />Unit 10: Adolescence: Social and personality development; problems during adolescence<br />Unit 11: Early adulthood (ages 20 to 40): Biosocial, cognitive and psychosocial development<br />Unit 12: Middle adulthood (40 to 65): Biosocial, cognitive and psychosocial development, midlife crises<br />Unit 13: Late adulthood (ages 65 +): Biosocial, cognitive and psychosocial development<br />Unit 14: The end of life<br />Unit 15: Final exam<br />COURSE CONTACT HOURS <br />Professors who teach the course must divide the contact hours the following way:<br />Face-to-face time in the classroom must not be less than 40.0 hours (16 classes, 2.5 hours each class).<br />For the remaining hours (≥ 10.0 hours), students will conduct research projects or homework outside the classroom. These projects or homework will include, but are not limited to, case discussions, critical analysis (articles, movies, DVD), case studies and interviews.<br />METHODOLOGY<br />The professor who offers the course will select the specific methodology. For this course the methodologies often used are: conferences by the professor, group discussions of assigned readings, class research projects, videos and transparencies.<br />EDUCATIONAL TECHNIQUES<br />The professor who offers the course will select the specific educational techniques. These techniques could include, but are not limited to: debates, practical demonstrations, research analysis, films, videos, simulations, slide shows and forums.<br />EVALUATION<br />The professor who offers the course will select the specific evaluation criteria. These methodologies could include, but are not limited to term papers, projects, literature reviews, research projects, exams and class presentations.<br />RESEARCH COMPETENCIES<br />Research Competencies for Ph.D./Psy.D. students<br />The student will be able to determine the appropriate methodological design-quantitative, qualitative or multi-methodological- to study a particular phenomenon within the human development area.<br />The students will be able to formulate a research question according to a quantitative or qualitative design.<br />The students will be able to analyze qualitative research literature in human development. <br />ATTENDANCE POLICY<br />Class attendance is mandatory for all students. After two unexcused absences, the student will be dropped from the class, unless the professor recommends otherwise. When a student misses a class, he/she is responsible for the material presented in class. <br />AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)<br />Students that need special accommodations should request them directly to the professor during the first week of class.<br />COURSE UNITS<br />UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE (OBJECTIVES AND <br /> REQUIREMENTS). INTRODUCTION TO THE PSYCHOLOGICAL <br /> DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE LIFE CYCLE. <br />The scope of human development <br />Basic influences in human development<br />Theoretical perspectives that guide the study of human development<br />Scientific research and methodology in human development studies<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the scope of human development.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />1. Outline the material that will be covered in the course.<br /> Identify the basic influences in human development.<br /> Understand the theoretical perspectives that guide the study of human development<br />Analyze and discuss the controversies that have evolved among developmentalists and the scientific method used to test hypotheses.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 1- The beginnings: Introduction to the psychological development through the life span. <br />DVD: The Psychological Development of the Child: Developmental Phases <br />before and after birth. (2005). APA.<br />DVD: Babies’ Minds: Piagetian and Kleinian Perspectives.<br />UNIT 2: THE BEGINNING OF LIFE: GENETICS AND PRENATAL <br /> DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion of this unit students will know the reproductive process, the mechanisms of heredity, environmental variables and how they influence later development.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe the process of conception and the first hours of development of the zygote.<br />Identify the mechanisms of heredity and explain how gender is determined.<br />Understand the interaction between heredity and the environment.<br />Know the factors in prenatal development that can cause birth defects or result in later problems.<br />Identify the factors that can increase the chances that prenatal development will result in a healthy baby.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 2 – The beginning of life: Genetics and prenatal development <br />Alcohol before birth. The Harvard Mental Health Letter, 21, 3, September 2004.<br />UNIT 3: BIRTH AND THE NEWBORN<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the birth process and the characteristics of the neonate.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Understand the labor process and the characteristics of the newborn.<br />Understand the Apgar Scale and the neonates’ responses to their environment. <br />Know the long-term consequences of a low birth weight.<br />Identify the factors increasing the likelihood of having an under weight baby.<br />Understand the typical growth patterns in the neonate.<br />Understand the development of the neonates’ sensory and motor abilities.<br />Distinguish between sensation and perception and describe how and why habituation is used in research on infant perception.<br />Describe the extent and development of an infant’s perceptual abilities in terms of the senses of vision, hearing, taste and smell.<br />Explain the basic reflexes of the newborn and distinguish between gross motor skills and fine motor skills.<br />Identify and describe Piaget’s stages of sensorimotor intelligence.<br />Review recent research findings on object permanence and cite criticisms of Piaget’s theory of sensorimotor intelligence.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 3– The birth process and the newborn <br />Jobs, S. (2006). Facilitating infant’s pretend play. Exchange Every Day, April.<br />UNIT 4: INFANTS: THE FIRST THREE YEARS. PHYSICAL AND <br /> COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT <br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the emotional and social development of infants, including the significant influences of attachment and temperament.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe the ways in which the brain changes or matures during infancy.<br />Understand how the newborn’s reflexes indicate brain maturation.<br />Describe the development of motor skills in the infant.<br />Understand the sensory abilities in infants.<br />Describe Piaget’s theory on cognitive development.<br />Describe language development during infancy and identify its major landmarks.<br />Contrast the theories of Skinner, Chomsky and Vygotsky regarding early language development. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 4 – Physical development in infancy<br />Chapter 5– Cognitive development in infancy <br />UNIT 5: INFANTS: THE FIRST THREE YEARS. SOCIAL AND PERSONALITY <br /> DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the social and personality development in infants.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Identify emotions and emotional expression in infants. <br />Understand the emerging sense of self-awareness and how it affects the infant’s emotions and relationships. <br />Understand how attachment is established and long term effects. <br />Explain the factors that help develop a sense of trust. <br />Understand the components and patterns of temperament. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 6– Social and personality development in infancy <br />DVD: Early socialization from age 2 to age 5. APA <br />UNIT 6: THE PRESCHOOL YEARS (AGES 3 TO 6)<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in preschoolers.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe the physiological growth and change in preschoolers.<br />Discuss the advances in gross and fine motor skills. <br /> Understand Piaget’s preoperational stage of cognitive development and the symbolic function.<br />Understand Vygotsky’s perspectives on cognitive development.<br /> Discuss the development of the self and its influence on the ability to form relationships.<br /> Describe Erikson’s Initiative versus Guilt crisis and the development of self-esteem.<br /> Distinguish between gender identity, gender roles, and gender stereotypes.<br /> Know the types of play and the influence of culture. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 7– Physical and cognitive development in preschool <br />Chapter 8– Social and personality development in preschool <br />UNIT 7: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD (AGES 7 TO 12): PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE AND <br /> PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the cognitive sophistication, acquisition of socialization skills, and emotions in pre-adolescents.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe normal physical growth and development during middle childhood and account for the usual variations among children.<br />Describe the development of motor skills during the school years.<br />Identify and discuss the logical operations of concrete operational thought and give examples of how these operations are demonstrated by school age children.<br />Discuss the information-processing perspective on cognitive development during the school years.<br />Identify the common themes of the theoretical views of the psychological development of school-age children.<br />Describe the development of self-understanding during middle childhood and its implications for children’s self-esteem.<br />Discuss the importance of peer groups.<br />Discuss the ways in which children’s friendship circles and social problem-solving skills change during the school years.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 9 – Physical and cognitive development in middle childhood<br />Chapter 10 – Social and personality development in middle childhood<br />UNIT 8: MIDTERM EXAM<br />UNIT 9: ADOLESCENCE (AGES 13 TO 19): PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE<br /> DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand maturity issues that accompany the adolescent growth spurt.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe physical growth in both the male and female adolescents.<br /> Discuss the development of sex organs and secondary sex characteristics in males and females during puberty.<br /> Discuss the adolescent’s preoccupation with body image and the problems that may arise in the development of a healthy body image.<br /> Discuss the factors that influence the onset of puberty.<br />Discuss adjustment problems of boys and girls who develop earlier or later than their peers, noting any significant short-and- long-term consequences.<br />Describe evidence of formal operational thinking during adolescence.<br />Discuss adolescent egocentrism and examples of egocentric fantasies and fables.<br />Outline Kohlberg’s stage theory of moral development.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 11-Physical and cognitive development during adolescence <br />DVD: Teens: What makes them tick? APA<br />Sáez, E. & Rosselló, J. (2006). Family context, depression symptoms and <br />Conduct Disorder in a sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. Revista <br />Puertorriqueña de Psicología, 16, 3-21.<br />UNIT 10: ADOLESCENCE: PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND <br /> PROBLEMS DURING ADOLESCENCE<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand the teen’s sense of identity, the establishment of autonomy and evaluation of vocational choices.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe Erikson’s view of the development of identity during adolescence, including the importance of social influences on identity formation.<br />2. Describe and give examples of each of the four major identity statuses and the characteristics associated with each.<br />Discuss the role of friends and peer groups in identity formation, including their role in developing male-female relationships.<br />Discuss serious adolescent problems such as drug use, pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and crash diets among others. <br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 12– Social and personality development during adolescence<br />Powell, K.C. (2004). Developmental psychology of adolescent girls: Conflicts and <br />identity issues. Education, 125, (1), 77-87.<br />Sartor, C. & Youniss, J. (2002). The relationship between positive parental <br />involvement and identity achievement during adolescence. Adolescence, 37, (146), 221-34. <br />Meyer, M.D. (2003). “It’s me. I’m it”: Defining adolescent sexual identity through <br />relational dialectics in Dawson’s Creek. Communication Quarterly, 51, (3), 262-276.<br />UNIT 11: EARLY ADULTHOOD: PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE AND <br /> PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will understand theories of adult development, typical physical and cognitive changes. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe changes in growth, strength, and health that occur during early adulthood.<br /> Discuss changes in the efficiency of various body functions, focusing on the significance of these changes for the individual.<br /> Identify age-related trends in the sexual responsiveness of both men and women during the decades from 20 to 40.<br />Describe the Piagetian approach to the study of adult cognition and the main characteristics of postformal thought.<br />Describe the five stages of cognition proposed by K. Warner Schaie.<br />Describe the three aspects of adult intelligence proposed by Robert <br /> Sternberg.<br />Explain adult moral reasoning proposed by Kohlberg and Carol <br /> Gilligan.<br />Identify the two basic tasks, or crises, of adulthood.<br />Identify Sternberg’s three components of love and the pattern by which they develop in relationships.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 13– Physical and cognitive development in early adulthood<br />Chapter 14– Social and personality development in early adulthood<br />Schaei, K.W. (2000). The impact of longitudinal studies on understanding development from young adulthood to old age. International Journal of Behavior Development, 24, 257-266.<br />UNIT12: MIDDLE ADULTHOOD: PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE AND <br /> PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT. MIDLIFE CRISES<br />Upon completion of this unit, students will know about transition and adaptation during middle adulthood associated with the family cycle, as well as the changing emotional-social context from individual, social, occupational, and cultural perspectives.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Identify the typical physical changes of middle adulthood and discuss their impact.<br />2. Describe how the functions of the sense organs and vital body systems change during middle adulthood.<br />3.Identify the typical changes that occur in the sexual-reproductive system during middle adulthood and age-related changes in sexual expression.<br />4.Explain the practical intelligence approach to the study of adult intelligence and how it differs from traditional measures of adult intelligence.<br />5.Distinguish between fluid and crystallized intelligence and how each is<br /> affected by age.<br />6.Discuss the concept of midlife crisis and evaluate research evidence <br /> concerning its occurrence.<br />7. Discuss the shift in career dynamics that typically occurs during middle <br /> age.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 15– Physical and cognitive development in middle adulthood<br />Chapter 16– Social and personality development in middle adulthood<br />UNIT 13: LATE ADULTHOOD: PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE AND<br /> PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT<br />Upon successful completion students will understand the physical and cognitive functioning of adults in the final stage of life; the concept of inner peace and the meaning of faith and religious rituals. <br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Identify several effects that aging characteristically has on the individual’s appearance and on the functioning of the sense organs.<br />Compare the wear-and-tear, cellular and programmed senescence theories of aging.<br />3. Explain the factors that might contribute to age-related declines in <br /> cognitive functioning.<br />4. Discuss the claims of developmentalists regarding the possibility of <br /> positive cognitive development during late adulthood.<br />5.Compare and contrast the disengagement, activity, and continuity <br /> theories of psychosocial development during late adulthood.<br />6.Describe the concept of generativist in late adulthood.<br />7.Discuss Erikson’s stage of integrity vs. despair and the process of achieving integrity in old age.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 17 – Physical and cognitive development in late adulthood<br />Chapter 18– Social and personality development in late adulthood<br />UNIT 14: DEATH AND DYING<br />Upon completion of this unit, students will understand of death as a natural stage of development.<br />LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br />Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:<br />Describe some cultural variations in how death is viewed and treated.<br />Describe the emotions typical of each of Elizabeth Keble-Ross’s stages of dying.<br />Evaluate Keble-Ross’s stages of dying in light of more recent research and discuss age-related differences in the conceptualization of death.<br />Describe the functions of mourning and describe the stages of the mourning process.<br />ASSIGNED READINGS:<br />Santrock, J. (2010). Chapter 19– The end of life: Agony and death <br />UNIT 15: FINAL EXAM<br /> TC l2 "REFERENCES<br />Aiken, L.R. (2000). Dying, death and bereavement. Fourth Edition. Mahwah, NJ. <br />Erlbaum.<br />Ainsworth, M.D. (1973). The development of infant-mother attachment. In B.M. Caldwell & H.N. Recite (eds.), Review of child development research. (Vol.3). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.<br />Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.<br />Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.<br />Bowl by, J. (1989). Secure and insecure attachment. New York: Basic Books.<br />Chomsky, N. (1957). Syntactic structures. The Hague: Mouton.<br />Darwin, C. (1859). On the origin of species. London: John Murray.<br />Elkind, D. (1976). Child development and education: A Piagetian perspective. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Elkind, D. (1981). Children and adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />Erikson, E.H. (1950). Childhood and society. New York: W.W. Norton.<br />Erikson, E.H. (1968). Identity: Youth and crisis. New York: W.W. Norton.<br />Freud, S. (1917). A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Washington Square Press.<br />Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books.<br />Gilligan, C. (1982). In a different voice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.<br />Horney, K. (1967). Feminine psychology. New York: W.W. Norton.<br />Kagan, J. (1984). The nature of child. New York: Basic Books.<br />Kagan, J. (1992). Yesterday’s premises, tomorrow’s promises. Developmental Psychology, 28, 990-997.<br />Kagan, J. (1996). Three pleasing ideas. American Psychologist, 51, 901-908.<br />Kohlberg, L. (1966). A cognitive-developmental analysis of children’s sex role concept and attitudes. In E.E. Maccoby (Ed.), The development of sex differences. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.<br />Kohlberg, L. (1969). Stage and sequence: The cognitive-developmental approach to socialization. In D.A. Gosling (Ed.), Handbook of socialization theory and research. Chicago: Rand McNally.<br />Kohlberg, L. (1976). Moral stages and moralization: The cognitive-developmental approach. In T. Lickona (Ed.), Moral development and behavior. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.<br />Kübler-Ross, E. (1969). On death and dying. New York: Macmillan<br />Kübler-Ross, E. (1974). Questions and answers on death and dying. New York: Macmillan.<br />Levinson, D.J. (1978). The seasons of a man’s life. New York: Knopf.<br />Lewis, L. (1998). Handbook of Diversity Issues in Heath Psychology. Sex Roles, 38, 325-328.<br />Locke, J.L. (1993). The child’s path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.<br />Lorenz, K.Z. (1965). Evolution and the modification of behavior. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.<br />Marcia, J. (1996). Review of Adolescence (7th ed.) by J.W. Santrock (Dubuque, IA: Brown & Benchmark).<br />Marcia, J.E. (1987). Ego identity development. In J. Adelson (Ed.), Handbook of adolescent psychology. New York: Wiley.<br />Neugarten, B.L. (1964). Personality in middle and late life. New York: Atherton.<br />Patterson, C.J. (1995). Sexual orientation and human development: An overview. Developmental Psychology, 31, 3-11.<br />Peck, R.C. (1968). Psychological developments in the second half of life. In B.L. Neugarten (ed.), Middle age and aging. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.<br />Piaget, J. (1932). The moral judgment of the child. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.<br />Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York: International Universities Press.<br />Piaget, J. (1954). The construction of reality in the child. New York: Basic Books.<br />Piaget, J. (1962). Play, dreams, and imitation in childhood. New York: W.W. Norton.<br />Phillips, S.D. & Imhoff, A.R. (1997). Women and career development: A decade of research. Annual Review of Psychology, 48, 31-59.<br />Santrock, J. W. (2008). Life-span development. (9th Ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.<br />Schaie, K.W. (1994a). The life course of adult intellectual abilities. American Psychologist, 49, 304-313.<br />Schaie, K.W. (1996). Intellectual development I adulthood: The Seattle Longitudinal Study. New York: Cambridge University Press.<br />Rider, M.E. & Riportella-Muller, R. (1999). Health care evolution: New roles for family and consumer professionals. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 91, 80-85.<br />Vaillant, G.E. (1977). Adaptation to life. Boston: Little Brown.<br />Vygotsky, L.S. (1962). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.<br />Revised by: Gladys Altieri, Ph.D. (March, 2010)<br />

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