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Canadian Internet Forum:
Digital Literacy Consultation
CIRA
Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA)
November 2010
Agenda
• Welcome and introductions
• Why are we here?
• Background paper
• Brief Q&A, discussions & responses
• Reflection...
Who is CIRA?
The Canadian Internet Registration
Authority (CIRA) is the organization
that
Manages Canada's .CA domain name...
Why are we here?
• In addition to running the .CA registry, CIRA is
mandated to undertake activities that support the
Inte...
Why a Canadian Internet Forum?
• In late 2009, CIRA worked with IISD to conduct a
survey of Canadians to ‘take the pulse’ ...
Key Findings
1. There is broad support for the establishment of a
Canadian Internet forum. The majority of respondents
(76...
Key Findings, cont’d
3. A Canadian Internet forum should not only create a
place for dialogue, but influence the advanceme...
Results
• As a result of the national survey, CIRA, along with the
International Institute for Sustainable Development and...
What are we doing here?
White paper
drafted,
presented to the
UN IGF and
Canadian
government in
2011.
National
consultatio...
Why is Digital Literacy Important?
• Economic value – increases in digital
literacy significantly impact both the ICT
sect...
Digital Literacy
“Survival skills for the 21st century”
These represent the skills and competencies that are
needed for ci...
Digital Literacy
Definitions are generally built on 3
principles:
• Use
• Understand
• Create
Background
Use
• technical ability
• basis for developing digital literacy skills
• increasingly important as platforms
converge
• in...
Understand
• comprehend, contextualize, evaluate
• critical understanding to maximize
opportunities and mitigate risk:
• p...
Create
• developing online content and
effectively communicating using a
variety of digital tools
• communicating to vario...
Digital literacy across the population
Digital Life
Skills
Everyone
Employment
Skills
Most
Advanced
Creative/Technical
Ski...
Effective implementation
Public
Awareness and
Community
Programs
Government
Job
Training
Education
K-12 and Post-
Secondar...
What are the policy implications for:
• Education
• Job Training
• Role of Government
• Communities
Background
What are the burning issues that Canadian
policy-makers need to consider relating to
the Internet and the skills needed by...
Key Questions
1. What is the current status of the basket of
issue in Canada?
2. What barriers and opportunities exist to
...
CIRA and its partners Media Awareness Network
and the International Institute for Sustainable
Development thank you for ta...
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Canadian Internet Forum: Digital Literacy Consultation

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Through November, CIRA has been conducting consultations across the country on Internet-related issues, including digital literacy. This presentation was given to Canadian Internet Forum (CIF) workshop participants in the digital literacy consultations. For more information about the CIF, visit http://cigf.cira.ca/

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Canadian Internet Forum: Digital Literacy Consultation

  1. 1. Canadian Internet Forum: Digital Literacy Consultation CIRA Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) November 2010
  2. 2. Agenda • Welcome and introductions • Why are we here? • Background paper • Brief Q&A, discussions & responses • Reflections on key issues and personal concerns • Break out session • Plenary session • Closing plenary discussions • Closing remarks
  3. 3. Who is CIRA? The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) is the organization that Manages Canada's .CA domain name registry, develops and implements policies that support Canada's Internet community and represents the .CA registry internationally.
  4. 4. Why are we here? • In addition to running the .CA registry, CIRA is mandated to undertake activities that support the Internet in Canada. • The Internet has become one of the most critical pieces of infrastructure of our time, yet there hasn’t been a lot of opportunity to discuss how it is run. • This forum is the place to discuss, debate and propose directions for the development, deployment and governance of the Internet in Canada.
  5. 5. Why a Canadian Internet Forum? • In late 2009, CIRA worked with IISD to conduct a survey of Canadians to ‘take the pulse’ of Canadians on issues related to Internet policy and governance. • An online, 20-question, self-selecting survey (French and English) was delivered; 801 surveys were completed. • The intent was to gauge the opinion of already engaged Canadians about domestic Internet governance issues.
  6. 6. Key Findings 1. There is broad support for the establishment of a Canadian Internet forum. The majority of respondents (76 per cent) expressed support for such a mechanism. 2. A Canadian Internet forum should include and engage a broad base of stakeholders, including governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, academia, Aboriginal organizations, and so on (90 per cent of respondents agreed). 3. A Canadian Internet forum should address issues of Internet development, access and use, but also issues where the Internet affects other public policy domains. Results from the survey point to the following recommendations:
  7. 7. Key Findings, cont’d 3. A Canadian Internet forum should not only create a place for dialogue, but influence the advancement of Internet-related policy (supported by 76 per cent of respondents). 4. A Canadian Internet forum should link with international Internet governance issues and policies (supported by 75 per cent of respondents). 5. A Canadian Internet forum has a strong likelihood of initial success. However, survey respondents support an ongoing dialogue/process on Internet governance.
  8. 8. Results • As a result of the national survey, CIRA, along with the International Institute for Sustainable Development and the Media Awareness Network are holding six consultations in November. • Two themes: – Digital Literacy – The Digital Economy • Consultations will be held in: Winnipeg, Halifax, Iqaluit, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver.
  9. 9. What are we doing here? White paper drafted, presented to the UN IGF and Canadian government in 2011. National consultation results to be presented at a national, open to the public event in February 2011. Online and direct email campaign to further inform the process to begin late November. Consultations: 6 total, resulting in individual and roll-up reports. National survey on Internet governance issues. Report to be released this week. To discuss, debate and propose directions for the development, deployment and governance of the Internet in Canada.
  10. 10. Why is Digital Literacy Important? • Economic value – increases in digital literacy significantly impact both the ICT sector and broader economy. • Cultural value - digitally literate citizenry is positioned to consume and create cultural content. • Democratic value – the Internet and digital media offers new ways for citizens both to engage democratically and utilize government services. Background
  11. 11. Digital Literacy “Survival skills for the 21st century” These represent the skills and competencies that are needed for citizens to thrive in a digital world: • working, learning, leisure • communicating and connecting • managing and mitigating risk • accessing services, information and opportunities Background
  12. 12. Digital Literacy Definitions are generally built on 3 principles: • Use • Understand • Create Background
  13. 13. Use • technical ability • basis for developing digital literacy skills • increasingly important as platforms converge • includes access and comfort levels with: • broadband services • computers • software • search engines • online databases Background
  14. 14. Understand • comprehend, contextualize, evaluate • critical understanding to maximize opportunities and mitigate risk: • privacy • authentication • reflection • rights and responsibilities • finding, assessing, using information • communicating, collaborating and problem-solving Background
  15. 15. Create • developing online content and effectively communicating using a variety of digital tools • communicating to various contexts and audiences • creating and communicating using rich media • efficiently and responsibly engaging with interactive user-generated content Background
  16. 16. Digital literacy across the population Digital Life Skills Everyone Employment Skills Most Advanced Creative/Technical Skills Some Background
  17. 17. Effective implementation Public Awareness and Community Programs Government Job Training Education K-12 and Post- Secondary Background
  18. 18. What are the policy implications for: • Education • Job Training • Role of Government • Communities Background
  19. 19. What are the burning issues that Canadian policy-makers need to consider relating to the Internet and the skills needed by Canadians to maximize its potential? Background
  20. 20. Key Questions 1. What is the current status of the basket of issue in Canada? 2. What barriers and opportunities exist to addressing/resolving those issues? 3. Who needs to act? 4. Who are the stakeholders needed to address issues?
  21. 21. CIRA and its partners Media Awareness Network and the International Institute for Sustainable Development thank you for taking the time to participate in this consultation! For more information: Blog: http://cigf.cira.ca Twitter: @mebuell, @CIRANews, @bakoh, @medlit Facebook: http://facebook.com/cira.ca

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