What’s so big about MAIZE?

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What’s so big about MAIZE?

  1. 1. What’s so big about MAIZE? Brown Bag Seminar CIMMYT HQ June 18th, 2012
  2. 2. Structure of Presentation • • • • • • Summary of challenges facing MAIZE What is MAIZE trying to achieve? Targeting of MAIZE Operationalisation of MAIZE Management of MAIZE Progress to date
  3. 3. MAIZE: Global Alliance for Improving Food Security and Livelihoods of the Resource-Poor in the Developing World
  4. 4. Challenges for MAIZE 1  Demand for maize in the developing world will double by 2050 – Population growth – Livestock revolution: meat & dairy – Use of maize for biofuel  Maize imports for developing country will increase 24% by 2050 – equalling USD 30 billion  World Market export prices for maize are expected to almost double over the next 20 years http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/rrexploring-food-price-scenarios-010611-en.pdf
  5. 5. Challenges For MAIZE 2 “In the next 50 years we will need to produce as much food as has been consumed over our entire human history.” Megan Clark, CEO of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Australia
  6. 6. In Summary • To double the [crop] productivity, and significantly increase the incomes and livelihood opportunities from more productive, resilient and sustainable maize-based farming systems on essentially the same land area, and as climates change and the costs of fertilizer, water, and labor increase.
  7. 7. What are we aiming to do?
  8. 8. • Increase the productivity of the target groups by: – 7% by 2020 – 33% by 2030 • Reach: – 40 million smallholder farm family members by 2020 – 175 million by 2030 • Provide enough maize to meet the annual food demand of: – An additional 135 million consumers by 2020 – An additional 600 million by 2030
  9. 9. Where are we aiming to do it?
  10. 10. Targeting Focus 1. Technology and market-limited farmers in stress prone areas 2. Technology-limited smallholder farmers with leverage to strongly increase maize productivity Areas not targeted by the private sector Estimated reach • Based on Hyman et al (2008) • 64% of the maize area in low and middle income countries • 660-830 million (>90%) maizedependent poor • 62 million (1/3 of all) stunted children
  11. 11. How are we aiming to do it?
  12. 12. Ten point action agenda for MAIZE “Strategic Initiatives” 1. Socioeconomics and policies for maize futures 2. Sustainable intensification and income opportunities for the poor 3. Smallholder precision agriculture 4. Stress tolerant maize for the poorest 5. Towards doubling maize productivity 6. Integrated postharvest management 7. Nutritious maize (with CRP4) 8. Seeds of discovery – tackling the black box of genetic diversity 9. New tools and methods for NARS and SMEs 1-9. Strengthening local capacities
  13. 13. Wow!!
  14. 14. Can it be done?
  15. 15. The good this is: We’re not alone  Inter-governmental organisations     WB AfDB ADB CAADP etc)  National Governments     Mexico (MasAgro – first of many) Indian Government (BISA) Agricultural research 4 development is back on the agenda ARIs – more resources for agricultural R4D  Private sector:  Corporate (post-2008 food crisis)  Domestic  Philanthropic donors  BMGF  Carlos Slim
  16. 16. MAIZE as a Multi-layered Platform • Global Platform: – SI 8 Seeds of Discovery (genetic potential) – SI 9 Novel Tools and Methods – IMIC • Regional Platforms: – – – – West and Central Africa Eastern and Southern Africa Asia and CWANA Latin America and Caribbean • National and sub-National Platforms: – – – – – – MasAgro (Mexican Government) SARD-SC (AfDB) DTMA (BMGF) SIMLESA (ACIAR) SIMLEZA (USAID) CSISA (IRRI-BMGF)
  17. 17. Management of MAIZE
  18. 18. Conceptualization of MAIZE: Mission CRPs SI’s Projects
  19. 19. Relationship between CRP and existing program management (CIMMYT) Inputs = Institutional dimension & majority involvement CRP Outputs = Interdisciplinary teams CRP 3.1 WHEAT Led by CIMMYT CRP 3.2 MAIZE CIMMYT Genebank IFPRI CRP 4 Nutrition IFPRI CRP 7 CCAFS CIAT # 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Con-sortium CRP 2 Policy SI or Themes 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 Short name Management Socioeconomics Systems NUE & WUE Wheat varieties Diseases & pests Heat & drought Yield barrier Seed Seeds of Discovery Capacities Management Socioeconomics Systems Yield gap Stress environments Double yield Postharvest Nutrition Seeds of Discovery Tools Maize Wheat Policies Institutions Markets Value chains Biofortification Diseases Integrated Programs Policies Adaptation Managing Risk Mitigation Decisions Making Bilateral Projects CAP CC Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple Multiple DG's office IP KM CIMMYT GMP PMU ICARDA GRP CRIL GRC GWP SEP IITA Others
  20. 20. How can MAIZE help to make this happen? • CGIAR Windows 1&2 funding – Linking existing and new bilateral projects (cement) – Expanding areas of R4D (upstream and downstream) – Competitive Grants Initiative
  21. 21. How can MAIZE help to make this happen? • Working more strategically with both new and existing partners – Private sector – INGOs – National Governments • NARES
  22. 22. Progress to date
  23. 23. What has been done so far? • Highlights: – Strategic R4D • Workplan • Competitive Grants Initiative – Project Management • Tools and Techniques (complement ICT developments) • Project Administrators – Partnerships • Partner survey and MoU
  24. 24. What has been done so far? • Highlights: – Communication • MAIZE Website (MAIZE.ORG) • Strategy and Plan • Co-development with IITA – Knowledge Management • Senior Knowledge Management Specialist • Knowledge Management Strategy and Plan • Capacity-Building – Monitoring and Evaluation • M&E Strategy and Plan • Co-development with IITA
  25. 25. What has been done so far? • Highlights: – Outcomes and Impact • Performance Management • Participatory Impact Pathway Analysis (PIPA/RIPE) – Outputs to Outcomes to Impact • KIT – Analysis of past and present interventions to frame the strategy for future action – Implementation and capacity-building – Knowledge development on the facilitation of innovation • Wageningen • CO – Strategy and Results Framework Action Plan – Performance Management System.
  26. 26. What can YOU contribute? You TELL me!
  27. 27. Thank You

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