Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
The Library Dividend
Standing up for the role of public libraries in digital, social and economic
inclusion
Nick Poole, CE...
What does ‘excluded’ look like...?
Case study: single pensioner
Rosaleen is 75, single and lives in south
Belfast where she is active in the local
community....
Case study: young jobseeker
Marc is 19 and lives in Redcar - a town
where there are twelve times as many
people claiming j...
Case study: low-paid worker
Renée is 40 and works long hours for low
pay to try to provide for her four children,
aged 3 t...
Key facts
 In 2014/15, there were 13.5 million people living in low-income households,
21% of the UK population
 The num...
New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
Everyone is equal when they walk into (or
log onto) a public library
“Social exclusion is a complex and multi-dimensional process.
It involves the lack or denial of resources, rights, goods a...
‘Bristol Social Exclusion Matrix’
Source: Poverty & Social Exclusion in the UK Project, funded by the ESRC
Resources Mater...
Source: UK Society of Chief Librarians
Public libraries are ideally placed to meet a wide
spectrum of needs which combat exclusion & help
people feel happy, safe...
Experience
of
exclusion
Digital
SocialEconomic
Technology presents
both the risk of making
it much worse and an
opportunit...
Source: Cabinet Office GOV.UK Digital Inclusion Charter (2014)
Digital inclusion
 Digital inclusion is increasingly important to enable all citizens to participate
and to access digita...
Source: Go-ON Local Digital Inclusion Outcomes Framework
“Lots of public services are looking to deliver these
kinds of support. What is it that makes a public
library so special?...
Strong foundation
Ethos Staff Stock Space
Services which adapt to meet the changing needs of our communities
Empowerment U...
So if we are doing all of this already, why do
we need to ‘stand up’ for it?
How do we stand up for this vital role of public
libraries?
1. Visibility
2. Influence
3. Evidence
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend is a way of measuring
the social, economic, cultural and creative
impact of enga...
http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/
http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/
Benefits
Use
Direct use
Indirect use
Non-use
Option
Legacy
Existence
• Access to library ...
http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/
Benefits
Use
Direct use Travel costs
Financial
savings
Contingent
valuation -
users
Indir...
Results
 The ‘library dividend’ in Queensland accounted for between $270-640m per
annum in direct benefit to the authorit...
In my view, public and mobile libraries are the single
most trusted & adaptable platform for social,
economic and digital ...
Can CILIP and PMLG collaborate to create a campaign
which secures recognition of and investment in this
vital work?
Thankyou!
Nick Poole, Chief Executive, CILIP
nick.poole@cilip.org.uk
@NickPoole1
@CILIPinfo
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend
The Library Dividend
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Library Dividend

Presentation to the 2017 CILIP Public & Mobile Libraries Group and Community, Diversity and Equalities Group conference in Yarnfield Park, near Stafford

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Library Dividend

  1. 1. The Library Dividend Standing up for the role of public libraries in digital, social and economic inclusion Nick Poole, CEO, CILIP
  2. 2. What does ‘excluded’ look like...?
  3. 3. Case study: single pensioner Rosaleen is 75, single and lives in south Belfast where she is active in the local community. Having worked all her life, she had thought that her state pension and a small occupational pension would be sufficient in her retirement. But, increasingly, she finds paying the bills difficult. “The choices that I would have to do without – I couldn’t go to the pictures because I’d be worrying about my money, in case I need it tomorrow. It’s scrimping, the whole of your life.” http://www.poverty.ac.uk/living-poverty/personal-experiences/rosaleen-single-pensioner
  4. 4. Case study: young jobseeker Marc is 19 and lives in Redcar - a town where there are twelve times as many people claiming job seeker’s allowance as there are job vacancies. Despite having passed a number of GCSEs and A-levels and having applied for hundreds of jobs over the last two years, Marc is still unemployed. “I want in my life to be steady enough to feed myself and my kids. I grew up on benefits and my sisters did. Because my mum couldn’t feed herself when she was feeding us. When she fed us, she would starve herself for two days.” http://www.poverty.ac.uk/living-poverty/personal-experiences/marcs-story-north-east-england
  5. 5. Case study: low-paid worker Renée is 40 and works long hours for low pay to try to provide for her four children, aged 3 to 14, and her 80-year-old mother. The three generations of the family share a damp and overcrowded three-bedroom council flat in Hackney, in inner London. “No-one sleeps in the back room because of the damp. If we did sleep in there, we’d get sick. We’ve no room, so me, my mum and my sister top and tail.” http://www.poverty.ac.uk/living-poverty/personal-experiences/renee-low-paid-worker
  6. 6. Key facts  In 2014/15, there were 13.5 million people living in low-income households, 21% of the UK population  The number of private renters in poverty has doubled over the last decade  The number of households accepted as homeless has increased for five years in a row. Evictions by landlords are near a ten-year high  The proportion of working-age adults in employment is at a record high. Full- time employees account for 62% of the growth in jobs since 2010  The number of people in poverty in a working family is 55% – a record high  1.4 million children are in long-term workless households, down 280,000 in four years. Excluding lone parent families with a child under five, 55% of these children have a disabled adult in their household. Source: Joseph Rowntree Foundation Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion Report 2016
  7. 7. New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
  8. 8. New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
  9. 9. New Government policy on ‘Social Integration’
  10. 10. Everyone is equal when they walk into (or log onto) a public library
  11. 11. “Social exclusion is a complex and multi-dimensional process. It involves the lack or denial of resources, rights, goods and services, and the inability to participate in the normal relationships and activities, available to the majority of people in a society, whether in economic, social, cultural or political arenas. It affects both the quality of life of individuals and the equity and cohesion of society as a whole.” The Multi-dimensional analysis of social exclusion (Levitas et al. 2007)
  12. 12. ‘Bristol Social Exclusion Matrix’ Source: Poverty & Social Exclusion in the UK Project, funded by the ESRC Resources Material/economic resources Access to public and private services Social resources Participation Economic participation Social participation Culture, education and skills Political and civic participation Quality of life Health and wellbeing Living environment Crime, harm and criminalisation
  13. 13. Source: UK Society of Chief Librarians
  14. 14. Public libraries are ideally placed to meet a wide spectrum of needs which combat exclusion & help people feel happy, safe, connected and free
  15. 15. Experience of exclusion Digital SocialEconomic Technology presents both the risk of making it much worse and an opportunity to target social inclusion in highly effective ways
  16. 16. Source: Cabinet Office GOV.UK Digital Inclusion Charter (2014)
  17. 17. Digital inclusion  Digital inclusion is increasingly important to enable all citizens to participate and to access digital services, products and networks.  Those who are digitally excluded are often at risk of social exclusion too. By encouraging digital inclusion, this can lead to better economic, health and social outcomes for people.  Organisations are already delivering digital inclusion services to meet local needs. However, activities are often measured by volume, rather than value and there is a need to measure digital inclusion in a consistent way Source: Government Digital Inclusion Outcomes Framework
  18. 18. Source: Go-ON Local Digital Inclusion Outcomes Framework
  19. 19. “Lots of public services are looking to deliver these kinds of support. What is it that makes a public library so special?” A. Councillor
  20. 20. Strong foundation Ethos Staff Stock Space Services which adapt to meet the changing needs of our communities Empowerment Universality Trust Added-value services where these are compatible with our ethos What makes public libraries so special is that they combine the flexibility to adapt to the changing needs of their community with a strong foundation, rooted in the ethics & values of librarianship... Article 19 “Freedom of expression & freedom of access to information”
  21. 21. So if we are doing all of this already, why do we need to ‘stand up’ for it?
  22. 22. How do we stand up for this vital role of public libraries? 1. Visibility 2. Influence 3. Evidence
  23. 23. The Library Dividend The Library Dividend is a way of measuring the social, economic, cultural and creative impact of engaging with a library and articulating it as a dollar value. Developed by the State Library of Queensland, it provides a standards, sector-wide way of advocating for the value of libraries. Do we need something like this? http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/
  24. 24. http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/
  25. 25. http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/ Benefits Use Direct use Indirect use Non-use Option Legacy Existence • Access to library resources/services • Social interaction • Sense of place and local amenity • Environmental savings • Contribution to literacy • Contribution to education, career and health • For future use • For current and future generations
  26. 26. http://plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au/ Benefits Use Direct use Travel costs Financial savings Contingent valuation - users Indirect use Non-use Option Legacy Existence Contingent valuation – non-users
  27. 27. Results  The ‘library dividend’ in Queensland accounted for between $270-640m per annum in direct benefit to the authorities  Accounting directly for the creation of 3,135 FTE jobs in the state  Directly and indirectly, library services generated $614m in income  $295m in GVA for the state per annum  Written by economists for economists! Source: Joseph Rowntree Foundation Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion Report 2016
  28. 28. In my view, public and mobile libraries are the single most trusted & adaptable platform for social, economic and digital inclusion and professional public librarians ideally-placed to drive it. Without a means of quantifying this – without visibility, relationships with key decision-makers and evidence to support our case, it will continue to be taken for granted.
  29. 29. Can CILIP and PMLG collaborate to create a campaign which secures recognition of and investment in this vital work?
  30. 30. Thankyou! Nick Poole, Chief Executive, CILIP nick.poole@cilip.org.uk @NickPoole1 @CILIPinfo

×