Trees with edible parts in forest and agroforests in Jambi landscape

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This presentation was given on 8 September 2012 at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea, during a session co-hosted by CIFOR titled ‘Managing wild species and systems for food security’.

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Trees with edible parts in forest and agroforests in Jambi landscape

  1. 1. Trees
with
edible
parts
in
forest
and agroforests
in
Jambi
landscape Hesti
L.
Tata,
Subekti
Rahayu,
Harti
Ningsih World
Agroforestry
Centre
(ICRAF‐SEA) World
Agroforestry
Centre 1
  2. 2. Presentation
Outline:• Population
vs
rice
production• Rubber
agroforests
(RAF)• Brief
description
of
research
sites• Tree
diversity
of
forest
and
RAF• Trees
with
edible
parts• Similarity
between
forest
and
RAF• Challenges
of
agroforestry
systems World
Agroforestry
Centre 2
  3. 3. Population
vs
Rice Production Source:
Statistics
Indonesia,
2012 ‐
Indonesia
is
the
largest
rice consumer.
Rice
consumption
is 140kg
of
rice
per
person
per
year. ‐‐
MDG1:
eradicate
poverty
and hunger. ‐‐
Challenges
for
agroforestry systems
to

provide
food
in
mix‐Source:
Statistics
Indonesia,
2012 planting
between
trees
and
crops. World
Agroforestry
Centre 3
  4. 4. Complex
RAF Rubber
monoculture Simple
RAF World
Agroforestry
Centre 4
  5. 5. Site
characteristicsWorld
Agroforestry
Centre 5
  6. 6. Landcover change in Bungo district in 1973-2008 2008 Source:
Landscape
Mosaic
Bungo
Team
(2008)Drivers
for
deforestation
at
landscape
level:(i) Land
conversion
(to
oilpalm
plantation,
industrial
forest
plantation
(HTI),rubber
monoculture,
transmigration
area,
shifting
cultivation
(land
grabbing)),(ii)

Logging
activities
(stopped
in
2000)(iii)
Mining
(coal)
  7. 7. RAF30F RAF60FForest SF25F World
Agroforestry
Centre 7
  8. 8. Species Density and Richness• Species
richness
and
density
of
sapling
were
higher
in
RAF‐60,
while
for
pole
washigher
in
shrub‐30
and
for
tree
was
higher
in
forest.• RAF‐13
and
RAF‐30
had
higher
density
but
also
had
lower
species
richness
thanother
landcover
types.• Low
species
richness
was
influenced
by
the
high
dominance
of
rubber
in
everyrubber
agroforest
site. Source:
Harti
Ningsih,
2008
  9. 9. Trees
with
edible
parts
in
research
sites,
BungoFamily Species name Uses Found inApocynaceae Dyera costulata latex for chewing gum RAFBombacaceae Durio zibethinus fruit RAFBurseraceae Canarium littorale nuts RAFBurseraceae Dacryodes rostrata fruit Forest and RAFClusiaceae Calophyllum venulosum fruits ForestEuphorbiaceae Aporusa octandra fruits ShurbsEuphorbiaceae Hevea brassiliensis young fruit RAFFabaceae Parkia speciosa nuts Forest and RAFMoraceae Artocarpus nitidus fruits ShurbsSapindaceae Nephelium ramboutan-ake fruits RAFSapindaceae Pometia pinnata fruits RAFSterculiaceae Sterculia foetida nuts for spice Shurbs Note:
medicinal
trees
are
not
included) World
Agroforestry
Centre 9
  10. 10. Beneficial
trees
in
RAF
and
Forest Class of Species Product Planted? Where? Harvest time species Introduce Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) Latex Yes Agroforest/ Daily d species Monoculture Oilpalm (Elaeis guineensis) Fruit Yes Monoculture Biweekly Local Durian (Durio zibethinus) Fruit/Tim Yes/no Agroforest Annual/ per 2-3 species ber year (10 most Petai (Parkia speciosa) Fruit Yes/no Agroforest Annual important) Duku (Lansium domesticum) Fruit Yes Agroforest Annual/ per 2-3 year Stinky bean Fruit No Agroforest Per 6 month (Archidendron jiringa) Kabau Fruit Yes/no Agroforest Per 6 month (Archidendron bubalinum) Local longan Fruit Yes/no Agroforest Annual/ per 2-3 (Dimocarpus longan) year Mangostan Fruit Yes Agroforest Annual/ per 2-3 (Garcinia mangostan) year Cempedak (Artocarpus Fruit Yes/no Agroforest Annually integer) Manau (Calamus sp) Rattan No Forest Annually Meranti (Shorea spp) Timber No Forest/Agfrst If necessary World
Agroforestry
Centre 10(Source:
Lehebel‐Peron,
2008)
  11. 11. Similarity
Index
between
Forest
and
RAF
in
various location
in
JambiStratum
(locations) Jaccard
Index SourcesSaplings
(Bungo
and
Tebo) 0.44 Rasnovi,
2006Poles
and
Trees
(Bungo) 0.14 Tata
et
al.,
2008Trees
(Bungo) 0.18 (this
study) It
is
shown
that
in
lower
stratum,
species
level
grow
in RAF
is
more
similar
to
forest
. World
Agroforestry
Centre 11
  12. 12. Challenges
of
agroforestry
system
for
food security• Tree
based
agroforestry,
such
as
rubber
agroforest, provides
foods,
mainly
fruits,
nuts
and
spices.• Trees
providing
carbohydrate
and
protein
(such
as
bread fruit,
jack
fruit,
candle
nuts,
etc.)
can
be
enriched
with enrichment
planting.• Taungya
system
provides
annual
crops,
such
as
upland, vegetables,
spices,
etc.• Promoting

new
variety
of
crops
with
light
intolerant, such
as
paddy
and
soybean,
that
can
be
grown
under canopy. World
Agroforestry
Centre 12
  13. 13. Thank
you World
Agroforestry
Centre 13

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