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Transparent monitoring in practice: Supporting post-Paris land use sector mitigation (TransMoni)

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Presented by Stibniati Atmadja, Manuel Boissière, Niki De Sy, Robert Masolele, at "Scoping Workshop: Towards the Enhanced Transparency Framework for REDD+ MRV", ILRI, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 30 July 2021

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Transparent monitoring in practice: Supporting post-Paris land use sector mitigation (TransMoni)

  1. 1. Transparent monitoring in practice: Supporting post-Paris land use sector mitigation (TransMoni) Project activities and expected outcomes in Ethiopia By: Stibniati Atmadja (s.atmadja@cgiar.org), Manuel Boissière, Niki De Sy, Robert Masolele Scoping workshop, ILRI, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 30 July 2021
  2. 2. Monitoring GHGs under the Paris Agreement Project goal • Developing, testing and approving good practice guidance, for national accountable implementation of TM approaches • Contribute with improved data to increase monitoring capacities • Supporting the uptake of the guidance in the international processes, including in the context of the UNFCCC negotiations. • Develop good practice methodologies for monitoring approaches that assist countries with limited resources and data in implementing improved monitoring in the land use sector o tool-neutral and bottom-up guidance for open source datasets/tools o based on case studies in several countries o testing opensource data/tools (e.g., FAO’s OpenForis, Global Forest Watch, Geo-Wiki) International Context • The Paris Agreement emphasizes the land use sector’s importance for mitigating climate change. o “In order to build mutual trust and confidence and to promote effective implementation, an enhanced transparency framework [ETF] for action and support, with built-in flexibility which takes into account Parties’ different capacities and builds upon collective experience is hereby established.” (Art 13:1 Paris Agreement)
  3. 3. Introduction of the project • Project title: Transparent monitoring in practice: Supporting post-Paris land use sector mitigation (TransMoni) • Country Partners o REDD+ Secretariat (Ethiopia) o SEPREDD (Côte d’Ivoire) o National Forest Authority (Papua New Guinea) o Ministry of Environment (MINAM) (Peru) • International Partners: o Oeko-Institut e.V. (Germany) (Lead) o CIFOR (Indonesia) (Co-Lead) o UN-FAO (Italy) o IIASA (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) (Austria) o National Wildlife Federation (NWF) (USA) o Wageningen University (Netherlands) • Duration: 3 years (start date Dec 2020) • Main donor: International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU)
  4. 4. Project expected outcomes in Ethiopia • Ethiopia’s national MRV system is better aligned with the Paris Agreement’s Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF), by improving processes and information quality for future submissions
  5. 5. Overview of proposed activities in Ethiopia 1. Improve community participation in MRV 2. Improve multilevel MRV collaboration O2. Improved national data on forest/land use change in light of the ETF (WUR + REDD Sec) O1. Improved a/reforestation MRV practices (CIFOR + REDD Sec) 3. Improve information on drivers of forest change by using national and global open-source datasets and methods
  6. 6. 3. Open-source data on drivers of forest change : Federal 2. Multilevel MRV: BGRS, Oromia Regional State, Federal 1. Participatory MRV: BGRS Assosa Zone Project geographical intervention (Ethiopia)
  7. 7. Outcome 1: Improved a/reforestation MRV practices Afforestation / Reforestation • one of the main sources of emission reductions in Ethiopia’s NDC and REDD+ implementation plan (RIP): • Important climate change adaptation in dry forest biomes • Produces carbon and non-carbon benefits A/reforestation main technical challenges • Difficult to monitor using remote sensing • Safeguards and non-carbon information still fragmented. • Data availability and flow between sectors and levels not yet well-understood • Planted and maintained by communities, but they are not data provider or validator • Data burden falls on woreda forest expert
  8. 8. Outcome 1: Improved a/reforestation MRV practices • Better collaboration across levels can improve data quality, usefulness and ownership • MRV on benefits and burdens of reforestation can help understand reasons of reforestation fails/success o Benefits: jobs, income, more access to fuelwood, timber, NTFPs. o Costs: labor, cash, reduced income, conflicts • Feedback from national to local can help o Communities/woreda experts to know how well they are doing compared to others o Transparent benefit sharing and grievance redress mechanisms
  9. 9. 1. Improving community participation in reforestation MRV (CIFOR) Background • Research on participatory MRV (PMRV) o Role of local actors in MRV: plant the trees, give data. o Participatory MRV can improve data quality, but benefits to local actors are unclear o Cost of PMRV: time, ‘illegal’ livelihoods in jeopardy o Benefit of MRV for local actors?  Feedback? Legitimacy? Access to information? o Sustainability and legitimacy of MRV compromised
  10. 10. Activities: literature review, interviews and focus group discussions with MRV- related practitioners and community members engaged in reforestation, about • The current and potential role of communities in reforestation MRV • Perceptions, motivations and worries in participating in reforestation MRV • Potential costs and benefits of reforestation MRV at the community, woreda and Kebele levels Outputs: Report and workshop (national and regional) on the potential of integrating communities in reforestation MRV; guidance on TM for Ethiopia Relevant actors: • Government institutions at federal level (EFCCC), • Government institutions at regional/local levels (woreda, kebele), • Local communities involved in restauration initiatives • CSOs (EWNRA, FarmAfrica, GLAD), academics (CIAT, CIFOR, WGCFNR) 1. Improving community participation in reforestation MRV (CIFOR)
  11. 11. 2: Improving multilevel collaboration in reforestation MRV Background • Research on transformational change in land use and climate change o Multi-level, multi-sector linkages essential to achieve change o Shared learning, information exchange, transparency • Research on REDD+ MRV in Ethiopia o MRV is multi-level, multi-sector issue o Non-carbon data not well-integrated o Actors at every level o Need to bring data and actors together How and why data is shared is as important as what data is shared
  12. 12. • Activities: Desk-based study, key informant interview and workshop series about o data availability of carbon and non-carbon REDD+ benefits for MRV o challenges/opportunities of data exchange and collaboration across levels. • Output: Report and workshop (national and regional) on multilevel MRV for reforestation; Guidance on TM for Ethiopia • Relevant actors: o Federal: EFCCC+ REDD+ Secretariat, other ministerial level agencies, Federal data managers (e.g. CSA, EMA, EBI), academics (e.g. EEFRI, WGNR, CIFOR- ICRAF, CIAT) o Regional (Oromia, BG): Government bureaus, REDD+ actors (Oromia REDD+ Coordination Unit, OFWE), CSOs with REDD+/restoration activities (Farm Africa, SOS Sahel, World Vision) o Zone/woreda/kebele (BG): local forestry expert & government administration, local restoration initiatives (Coordinate with outcome #1) 2: Improving multilevel collaboration in reforestation MRV
  13. 13. Outcome 2: Improved national data on forest/land use change in light of the ETF • Better understanding of land use change dynamics o Updated assessment of land use following deforestation in Ethiopia is essential for REDD+ implementation and not routinely available as a national dataset o Open-source tools such as SEPAL and Open FORIS could be leveraged to assess forest/land use change based on satellite time series data, in combination with high resolution images that can be used to support calibration and validation • Preparing for the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) in GHG accounting o Explore match between country-reported data and global datasets, and work towards understanding of differences and (if needed) harmonization  E.g. harmonization of classes, and consideration of spatial and temporal differences in datasets. o Need to understand uncertainties in datasets o Need trained staff
  14. 14. Background • PhD candidate Robert Masolele • Pantropical case study • AI/deep learning models using spatial and temporal information from dense Landsat time-series to predict land use activities driving deforestation • Open source platform in SEPAL and GEE 3. Open-source datasets and information on drivers of forest change
  15. 15. Way forward • Adapt deep learning model to Ethiopian context • Land use classes • Method o SEPAL o Forest loss 2010 – 2014 o Land use following deforestation 2016 o Planet data, Landsat & Sentinel 2 o Other open-source data for calibration and validation Follow-up land use classes Agriculture Large-scale croplands Small-scale cropland Pasture/free grazing Coffee crops Mining Infrastructure Roads Buildings and dams Plantation forest Other land with tree cover 3. Open-source datasets and information on drivers of forest change
  16. 16. • Activities: develop reproducible open-source method in SEPAL for assessing direct drivers of forest loss for Ethiopia with o Close collaboration with EFCCC and FAO/SEPAL o Exploring the match between (open-source) national and global datasets, and work towards understanding of differences and (if needed) harmonization o Integration of high-resolution imagery to calibrate and validate existing assessment of land use change o Possibility of regular updates in the future by Ethiopia partners (and other countries) • Output o Methodology for assessing drivers of forest change for Ethiopia implemented in SEPAL o Joint report on forest and land use change for Ethiopia o Experiences as input to TM guidance for Ethiopia and beyond 3. Open-source datasets and information on drivers of forest change
  17. 17. cifor.org blog.cifor.org ForestsTreesAgroforestry.org

Presented by Stibniati Atmadja, Manuel Boissière, Niki De Sy, Robert Masolele, at "Scoping Workshop: Towards the Enhanced Transparency Framework for REDD+ MRV", ILRI, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 30 July 2021

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