Reducing tropical forest loss through           multiple-use?       Manuel R. Guariguata
20
years
ago
in
Rio…“Forest
resources
and
forest
lands
should
besustainably
managed
to
meet
the
social,economic,
ecologica...
• Food
supplies
will
expand
70
%
by
2050
and  demand
for
wood
and
fiber
will
concurrently  increase• How
can
we
sustain
en...
How are forests being used?          Strict protection     Multiple use   Indigenous territories          (IUCN I-IV)     ...
Who owns the forest?Sunderlin
et
al.
2008
How do deforestation and degradation     fit in the current scenario?• In
Latin
America
and
Asia,
strict
forest  protectio...
Multi-use: challenges• Technical
and
managerial
capacities
differ
for  different
forest
products
and
market  opportunities...
In
Guatemala,
ten
years
afterthe
implementation
ofcommunity
forest
concessions,those
with
the
highest
degreeof
product
div...
In
Peru,
segregation
of
production
objectives
was
not
effective
Policy dimensionsAichi
Target
5:
Rate
of
loss
of
all
natural  habitats,
including
forests,
is
at
least  halved
…and
degrad...
Reducing tropical forest loss through multiple use?
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Reducing tropical forest loss through multiple use?

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To meet growing global demands for food without losing more forests to conversion, we need innovation in forestry practices to keep space for productive forests while meeting ever-growing societal needs. This presentation explores the potential of multiple use forests for reducing tropical forest loss – because despite technical, managerial and regulatory challenges, ‘multiple use’ has proven to be beneficial in many areas. CIFOR scientist Manuel Guariguata gave this presentation during Tree Diversity Day, held on 11 October 2012 at the 11th Conference of Parties for the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP11). Tree Diversity Day was organised by the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry. For more information visit www.worldagroforestry.org/crp6/events/tree-diversity-day-cbd-cop11

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Reducing tropical forest loss through multiple use?

  1. 1. Reducing tropical forest loss through multiple-use? Manuel R. Guariguata
  2. 2. 20
years
ago
in
Rio…“Forest
resources
and
forest
lands
should
besustainably
managed
to
meet
the
social,economic,
ecological,
cultural
and
spiritualneeds
of
present
and
future
generations.These
needs
are
for
forest
products
andservices,
such
as
wood
and
wood
products,water,
food,
fodder,
medicine,
fuel,
shelter,employment,
recreation,
habitats
forwildlife,
landscape
diversity,
carbon
sinksand
reservoirs,
and
for
other
forestproducts.”
  3. 3. • Food
supplies
will
expand
70
%
by
2050
and demand
for
wood
and
fiber
will
concurrently increase• How
can
we
sustain
enough
productive
forest and
land
available
for
agriculture
to
meet current
demands
without
further
forest conversion?• Keeping
space
for
productive
forests
will require
innovation
in
forestry
practices
while meeting
ever‐growing
societal
needs
  4. 4. How are forests being used? Strict protection Multiple use Indigenous territories (IUCN I-IV) (IUCN V-VI)Nelson
and
Chomitz
(2011)
  5. 5. Who owns the forest?Sunderlin
et
al.
2008
  6. 6. How do deforestation and degradation fit in the current scenario?• In
Latin
America
and
Asia,
strict
forest protection
substantially
reduced
fire incidence
but
multi‐use
areas
were
even more
effective• Across
the
tropics,
deforestation
rates
in protected
areas
were
significantly
larger
than in
multi‐use
protected
areasNelson
and
Chomitz
2011;
Porter‐Bolland
et
al.
2012
  7. 7. Multi-use: challenges• Technical
and
managerial
capacities
differ
for different
forest
products
and
market opportunities• Local
communities
and
small‐scale
operators struggle
to
adjust
their
practices
to
meet official
regulations—which
in
turn
show
little harmonization
for
multiple
objectives• Spatial
planning
for
long
term
production
is usually
disregarded—particularly
for
multiple uses
and
multiple
views• Ossified
tropical
forestry
curricula
  8. 8. In
Guatemala,
ten
years
afterthe
implementation
ofcommunity
forest
concessions,those
with
the
highest
degreeof
product
diversificationand
social
organization
arebetter
able
to
buffer
economicuncertaintyRadachowsky
et
al.
2012
  9. 9. In
Peru,
segregation
of
production
objectives
was
not
effective
  10. 10. Policy dimensionsAichi
Target
5:
Rate
of
loss
of
all
natural habitats,
including
forests,
is
at
least halved
…and
degradation
and fragmentation
is
significantly
reducedAichi
Target
11:
Terrestrial
areas
are conserved…and
integrated
into
the wider
landscapes
and
seascapes• Management
tradeoffs
are
complex and
acute
in
multiple
use
systems• Social
learning
and
multi‐stakeholder dialogue
is
essential• Spatial
approaches
for
planning

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