Michael Balinga, Terry Sunderland, Serge Ngendakumana, Abdon Awono,  Zida Mathurin and Bouda Henri Noel Promoting best pra...
MANO RIVER UNION COUNTRIES
Colonial Period 1 st  Republic 2 nd  Republic 2 nd  Republic Establishment of  Classified Forests Repressive conservation ...
1986: Decentralisation policy 1989: Forestry Code in 1989, Environment Code in 1989 1991: Wildlife code 1992: Land Code  1...
Balayan Souroumba Sincery Oursa Souti Yanfou Nyalama Size  42,737 ha 30,195ha 21,501ha 23,944 ha No. of villages 20 30 30 ...
Chemonix Winrock CIFOR-ICRAF- USFS <ul><li>Scoping studies  </li></ul><ul><li>Design & Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>1 st...
<ul><li>Auto-evaluation of comanagement process by the existent comanagement committees using each FMC as a focus group </...
<ul><li>Limited stakeholder involvement from the start (representivity and gender inequity) </li></ul><ul><li>Access to re...
1996 MODEL Executive Bureau FMC Commissions Supervisor Village Assemblies Woman Craftsman Youth Elder
2008 MODEL FMC General Assembly FMC Administrative Board FMC Director/President Protection Committee Exploitation Committe...
<ul><li>Voluntary registration and purchase of shares </li></ul><ul><li>Devolution of power and access rights over forest ...
 
<ul><li>Involving communities in the design as well as implementation is an important element for success of failure of jo...
<ul><li>Devolution model must be aligned to or embedded in existing policies </li></ul><ul><li>These policies must in turn...
<ul><li>BUT </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>“ joint forest management”, “community forestry”, “participatory forest ...
“ There is increasing recognition also that there is no single model of collaborative management that can be applied indis...
<ul><li>Objectives: e.g. biodiversity conservation vs. livelihood and community development </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership an...
<ul><li>Guinea comanagement model has been successfully tested as a model in a couple of sites, however there is need for ...
<ul><li>www.cifor.cgiar.org </li></ul>Thank you THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION, INTEREST, AND CONTRIBUTIONS
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Promoting best practices for joint forest management of forest resources in the Mano River Union

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Michael Balinga, Terry Sunderland, Serge Ngendakumana, Abdon Awono, Zida Mathurin and Bouda Henri Noel

Presentation for the conference on
Taking stock of smallholders and community forestry
Montpellier France
March 24-26, 2010

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Promoting best practices for joint forest management of forest resources in the Mano River Union

  1. 1. Michael Balinga, Terry Sunderland, Serge Ngendakumana, Abdon Awono, Zida Mathurin and Bouda Henri Noel Promoting best practices for joint forest management of forest resources in the Mano River Union
  2. 2. MANO RIVER UNION COUNTRIES
  3. 3. Colonial Period 1 st Republic 2 nd Republic 2 nd Republic Establishment of Classified Forests Repressive conservation of forests Global economic crisis & National Policy reform Development of comanagement in Guinea
  4. 4. 1986: Decentralisation policy 1989: Forestry Code in 1989, Environment Code in 1989 1991: Wildlife code 1992: Land Code 1997: Environmental Action Plan 2005: Law on Cooperatives 2007: Agricultural development Policy, draft National Strategy for Participatory Forest Management 2008: Co-management Guidelines POLICY REVIEW PROCESS
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Balayan Souroumba Sincery Oursa Souti Yanfou Nyalama Size 42,737 ha 30,195ha 21,501ha 23,944 ha No. of villages 20 30 30 25 Population (est.) 8,714 11,058 7,618 5,703 Revenue sources Farming, Livestock rearing, NTFP collection, charcoal and firewood exploitation Farming, Livestock rearing, Hunting, NTFP collection charcoal, firewood and timber exploitation Farming, Livestock rearing, Hunting, NTFP collection charcoal, firewood and timber exploitation Farming, Livestock rearing, Hunting, NTFP collection, firewood and timber exploitation Legal framework for land and forest resources Classified in 1951 as a state protection forest. Co-management of Natural resources introduced in 1999. Weak to inexistent land tenure system Classified in 1943 as a State protection forest. Co management introduced in 2000. Weak to inexistent land tenure systems Classified in 1943 as a State protection forest. Co management introduced in 2000. Weak to inexistent land tenure systems Classified in 1943 as a State protection forest. Co management introduced in 1996. Weak to inexistent land tenure systems
  7. 7. Chemonix Winrock CIFOR-ICRAF- USFS <ul><li>Scoping studies </li></ul><ul><li>Design & Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>1 st Management Plan </li></ul><ul><li>1 st FMC </li></ul><ul><li>Support policy reform </li></ul><ul><li>Advocate for PFM </li></ul><ul><li>Scale out Initial model </li></ul><ul><li>Other management Plans </li></ul><ul><li>Model analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Governance review </li></ul><ul><li>Policy development </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity building </li></ul>Watershed protection Collaborative Management introduced Landscape management Adaptive management NRMA 1993-2000 ENRMA 2000-2005 LAMIL 2005-2008
  8. 8. <ul><li>Auto-evaluation of comanagement process by the existent comanagement committees using each FMC as a focus group </li></ul><ul><li>Set of 9 questions used for a SWOT analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Identification of strengths and weaknesses of current model highlighted and recommendations made by communities </li></ul><ul><li>Testing and periodic review of procedures on an annual basis based on a dialogue process </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Limited stakeholder involvement from the start (representivity and gender inequity) </li></ul><ul><li>Access to resources restricted (timber, Land, etc.) although necessary for commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Weak Implementation capacity (policy gaps, guidelines, reporting and accounting procedures, audits systems, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Benefit sharing mechanis m often unclear or not applied </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of appropriation by communities of the process </li></ul><ul><li>No provision for long term monitoring and reorientation </li></ul>
  10. 10. 1996 MODEL Executive Bureau FMC Commissions Supervisor Village Assemblies Woman Craftsman Youth Elder
  11. 11. 2008 MODEL FMC General Assembly FMC Administrative Board FMC Director/President Protection Committee Exploitation Committee Control Committee
  12. 12. <ul><li>Voluntary registration and purchase of shares </li></ul><ul><li>Devolution of power and access rights over forest resources (timber, land, NTFPs, firewood, etc.) from state to community </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing of responsibilities (monitoring, reforestation, policing, etc.) but also benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Audits systems </li></ul><ul><li>Gender equity (25%) </li></ul><ul><li>Legal and Policy foundation </li></ul>
  13. 14. <ul><li>Involving communities in the design as well as implementation is an important element for success of failure of joint management schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Devolution of management responsibility was facilitated by access to economic benefits especially timber and agricultural land </li></ul><ul><li>The economic value of timber can be an important asset to community development but is often a source of conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Designing a functional model is an evolutionary process requiring periodic evaluation and adaptation </li></ul>
  14. 15. <ul><li>Devolution model must be aligned to or embedded in existing policies </li></ul><ul><li>These policies must in turn integrate contextual realities in order to be appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Governance measures should ensure continuity of change processes </li></ul><ul><li>Technical and managerial capacity is often a constraint to effective implementation and needs to be addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated and multidisciplinary approach needed: Biodiversity conservation is an objective, livelihoods improvement a means and governance the framework. </li></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><li>BUT </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>“ joint forest management”, “community forestry”, “participatory forest management”, “co-management”, “communal forestry” might mean the same thing in different contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>Or </li></ul><ul><li>Any single one of these terms could refer to several different forms of forest management across different contexts. </li></ul>
  16. 17. “ There is increasing recognition also that there is no single model of collaborative management that can be applied indiscriminately regardless of context.” (Brown 1999)
  17. 18. <ul><li>Objectives: e.g. biodiversity conservation vs. livelihood and community development </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership and tenure issues: e.g. state vs. communal lands </li></ul><ul><li>Level of devolution: total community control to shared management </li></ul><ul><li>Duration of community mandate: short (5 years) to longer (25 years or more) </li></ul><ul><li>Legal representation of communities: associations, councils, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Benefit sharing mechanisms: taxes vs. direct revenue or minimal to optimal revenue allocated to communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Incentives: Cash vs. non cash </li></ul>
  18. 19. <ul><li>Guinea comanagement model has been successfully tested as a model in a couple of sites, however there is need for replication within Guinea. </li></ul><ul><li>Neighboring countries are in the process of adopting comanagement, but this needs to be adapted to the specific policy and socio-economic contexts of each country </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying and promoting good practices in Forest management is a long term and adaptive process. </li></ul>
  19. 20. <ul><li>www.cifor.cgiar.org </li></ul>Thank you THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION, INTEREST, AND CONTRIBUTIONS

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