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Political economy and community characteristics for fire prevention and peatland restoration

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Presented by Herry Purnomo of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) at the 3rd Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, on 23–25 April 2018 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

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Political economy and community characteristics for fire prevention and peatland restoration

  1. 1. Asia Pacific Rainforest Summit, Yogyakarta, 24 April 2018 PEATLAND POLICY POLITICAL ECONOMY AND COMMUNITY CHARACTERISTICS FOR FIRE PREVENTION AND PEATLAND RESTORATION Herry Purnomo
  2. 2. KEY MESSAGES 1. Politics and economical interests of actors (governments, large private sectors, elites, migrants and communities) highly affect fire prevention and peatland restoration. 2. Agriculture (e.g. oil palm and soybean) is a driver for deforestation, but alleviating poverty. 3. Land use contestation is uncontrolled due to illegal land transaction and corruption. Original communities and migrants have different land title and size. 4. Business model i.e. organizational design and value creation for community-based fire prevention and restoration needs to invest and exist.
  3. 3. IN 2015
  4. 4. THE MINISTERS AND FIRE PREVENTION, 19 DECEMBER 2017 Agriculture, economy and environment trade offs
  5. 5. WHO CONTROL THE LANDSCAPE TRANSFORMATION? Fires
  6. 6. PROTECTED FOREST IN RIAU
  7. 7. INDONESIAN PALM OIL SIMULATION Export, Gov ernment Incomes and CPO Fund (million USD) Page 2 5 16 28 39 50 Years 1: 1: 1: 2: 2: 2: 3: 3: 3: 4: 4: 4: 5: 5: 5: 0 45000 90000 1: gov Income$m 2: cpoFund$m 3: v aluePOexport 4: v alu…derExport 5: v alueTotExport 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 34 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 CO2e net emissions (million ton) Page 4 1 13 26 38 Years 1: 1: 1: 0 400 800 1: netEmCO2eM 1 1 1 1 22:17 17 Apr 2018 Cumulativ e def orestation and conv ersions (Mha) ge 7 0 8 15 23 30 Years 0 13 25 1: def orestation 2: shrubConv ersion 3: otherConv ersion 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3
  8. 8. Who gets what: Burning land (ready to plant) Village head & officers $88 (10%) Land claimant, $38 (4%) Farmer group member, tree cutting $77 (9%) Farmer group member, slashing $96 (11%) Marketing team, $54 (6%) Total Benefit $856/ha Farmer group organizer $486 (57%) Farmer group member, burning $15 (2%) Farmer group member, cheap/free land $2 (0.2%)
  9. 9. BUSINESS MODEL FOR NOT USING FIRE – HOW? 19 April 2018
  10. 10. BUSINESS MODEL FOR COMMUNITIES
  11. 11. KEY MESSAGES 1. Politics and economical interests of actors (governments, large private sectors, elites, migrants and communities) affect fire prevention and peat restoration agenda. 2. Agriculture (e.g. oil palm and soybean) is a driver for deforestation, but alleviating poverty and providing incomes. 3. Land use contestation is uncontrolled due to illegal land transaction and corruption. Original communities and migrants have different land title and size. 4. Business model i.e. organizational design and value creation for haze-free sustainable livelihoods needs to invest and exist.

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