Institutional embeddedness of information sharing                      on REDD+               A Case from Indonesia Moira ...
QUESTIONSHow might information         • Democratization drive change in ideas and       more open information discourses...
Information = powerInformation is the currency of todays world. Those who control information are the                     ...
115 actors identified (expert panel); 64 surveyed, 64 semi‐structured interviews     Network of information, colour by typ...
PNA Actors Colour Coding                                                                          Actor    Actors         ...
Discussion Information flow is dense, no single actor controls info flow Reciprocal info limited to specialized network ...
Conclusion•    ONE WAY COMMUNICATION: Reciprocal     information flow is mostly linked to     organizational types and fun...
In addition some important issues relevant to efficientinformation flow not explored in this paper are:– It is not only th...
AcknowledgementsThe here presented research is part of the policy component of CIFOR’s global comparative study (GCS) http...
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Institutional embeddedness of information sharing on REDD+: a case from Indonesia

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They say information is power. How might information drive change in ideas and discourses, which in turn drive institutional change? How effective is the information network on REDD+? This presentation explores issues relevant to efficient information flow, particularly in the case of information sharing about REDD+ in Indonesia.

CIFOR scientist Moira Moeliono gave this presentation on 18 June 2012 at a panel discussion organised by CIFOR and partners at the ISEE 2012 Conference at Rio, which convened under the topic "Ecological Economics and Rio+20: Challenges and Contributions for a Green Economy". The panel was titled ‘National strategies for reducing emissions from avoided deforestation and degradation – how much transformational change is possible in current political and economic realities? Part I – An overview’. For more information, visit http://www.cifor.org/events/rio20/

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Institutional embeddedness of information sharing on REDD+: a case from Indonesia

  1. 1. Institutional embeddedness of information sharing on REDD+ A Case from Indonesia Moira Moeliono, Caleb Gallemore, Maria Brockhaus and Levania Santoso Rio de Janeiro-19 June 2012
  2. 2. QUESTIONSHow might information  • Democratization drive change in ideas and  more open information discourses which in turn  exchangedrive institutional change  • REDD+ = a new conceptor how is information  • How effective is the exchange driven by those  information network on ideas and discourses? REDD+?
  3. 3. Information = powerInformation is the currency of todays world. Those who control information are the  most powerful people on the planet –and,  the ones with the most bulging bank accounts. (Matthew Lesko) 
  4. 4. 115 actors identified (expert panel); 64 surveyed, 64 semi‐structured interviews  Network of information, colour by type, size by indegree PNA Actors Colour Coding Actor  Actors Colour Code 1 Central Government Light Blue Network of information. Nodes scaled by  2 3 Regional Government University/Academia Blue Purple indegree, color denotes type 4 Private Sector Yellow 5 National Civil Society  Light Green Organizations 6 International NGO Lighter Green Closely connected network: >90% of nodes connected within 2 steps  7 8 International  Organizations Donors Lighter Blue Turquoise of less. 9 Participatory Venue Red Wide distribution of highly central organizational types Prominence of governmnet and large international organizations
  5. 5. PNA Actors Colour Coding Actor  Actors Colour Code 1 Central Government Light Blue 2 Regional Government Blue 3 University/Academia Purple 4 Private Sector Yellow 5 National Civil Society  Light Green Organizations 6 International NGO Lighter Green 7 International  Organizations Lighter Blue Information network, reciprocated ties. Nodes scales by  8 Donors Turquoise Betweenness.  Color denotes type of stakeholder 9 Participatory Venue RedNodes w/o ties; 3 components; info exchange stronger within organizations; actor 38 and 54 act as liaison or brokers between groups
  6. 6. Discussion Information flow is dense, no single actor controls info flow Reciprocal info limited to specialized network  REDD+ at early  stage? Or limitation of mandates? Brokers and liaisons Information function of other relationships 
  7. 7. Conclusion• ONE WAY COMMUNICATION: Reciprocal  information flow is mostly linked to  organizational types and functional roles, • BOILING IN OWN SOUP: lack of  reciprocity be an indicator of stickiness of  institutions and resistance to change.• LIMITED CONTENT ON INFO‐ HIGHWAYS:  Directed information flow occurs  whenever an opportunity arises but seems  to be more aimed at network building for  future use rather than actual information  exchange
  8. 8. In addition some important issues relevant to efficientinformation flow not explored in this paper are:– It is not only the quality and accessibility of information but in the end also the capacity of users. Information requires capacity to become knowledge and knowledge requires capacity to be applied.– Information can be shared freely but will it be understand and used (as well as mis-used) in many different ways in accordance with capacity but mostly with interests of the different actors.– the mind set, mental models and beliefs that enable people to share information, to learn, and to ask for it. THINKING beyond the canopy
  9. 9. AcknowledgementsThe here presented research is part of the policy component of CIFOR’s global comparative study (GCS) http://www.forestsclimatechange.org/global‐comparative‐study‐on‐redd.html, led by Maria Brockhaus. The methods applied in this study build on work undertaken in COMPON (‘Comparing Climate Change Policy Networks’, http://compon.org/), led by Jeffrey Broadbent and financially supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Monica Di Gregorio and Maria Brockhaus adapted the COMPON research ‘Protocol for Policy Network Analysis’.Special thanks to Riccardo De Vita, Pham Thu Thuy, Efrian Muharrom and the data base team at CIFOR, Sofi Mardiah,  and Christine Wairata. We gratefully acknowledge the support received from the Norwegian Agency for  Development Cooperation, the Australian Agency for International Development, the  European Commission, and the UK Department for International Development. THINKING beyond the canopy

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