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Daniel Murdiyarso and Sigit D. Sasmito, CIFOR
Indonesian mangroves: the best hope for
global climate change mitigation
What is SWAMP?
The overall goal is
to provide policy makers with credible scientific
information needed to make sound deci...
Where Do We Work?
40 SWAMP publications
Peer-reviewed
Journals Working papers
 73,815 downloads
 15,338 distributed
Why Mangroves?
• Mangroves are important in the global
carbon cycles
• Very high C stocks (blue carbon), some of the
highe...
Are mangroves forgotten ecosystem?
Source: Friess et al. Conservation Biology (Accepted)
Mangroves vs Coral Reefs
Nemo: Clown fish
Habitat: Coral reefs
Finding “Nemo” vs Finding “Dragon of Muds”
Dragon of muds: ...
Finding mangrove: Why Indonesia?
• 22.6% (2.9 Mha) of global mangroves
• The highest deforestation rate in earth (52,000 h...
How do we work? a “dirty” science
Donato et al. Nature Geoscience (2011)
Findings: Indo-West Pacific
Our New Findings: Indonesia
• Ecosystem C stocks 1,083 ± 378 Mg C ha–1
• Soil (78%)
• Biomass (20%)
• Necromass (2%)
• Tot...
Mangrove C stocks across Indonesian archipelago
Murdiyarso et al. Nature Climate Change (2015)
Land Use Emission Vs Aquaculture Expansion
NEW APPROACHES FOR RESTORATION
AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT
Photo by: Ben Brown
Firewood ???$ Mangrove Crab ???$Ecotourism ?...
Key messages
• Mangroves are important in global
carbon cycles and provide numerous
ecosystem services
• Mangroves are thr...
Email: s.sasmito@cigar.org
www.cifor.org/swamp
http://blog.cifor.org/wetlands/
THANK YOU
@sdsasmito
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Indonesian mangroves the best hope for global climate change mitigation

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This presentation, delivered by Daniel Murdiyarso and Sigit D. Sasmito, outlines the Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program.

As well as highlighting the global importance of wetlands, the presentation also details the particular significance of wetlands in Indonesia.

Published in: Environment
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Indonesian mangroves the best hope for global climate change mitigation

  1. 1. Daniel Murdiyarso and Sigit D. Sasmito, CIFOR Indonesian mangroves: the best hope for global climate change mitigation
  2. 2. What is SWAMP? The overall goal is to provide policy makers with credible scientific information needed to make sound decisions relating to the role of tropical wetlands in climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies. The specific objectives are to: • Quantify GHG emissions and C-stocks and changes • Develop models of ecosystem C-dynamics • Assess the roles of tropical wetland ecosystems in climate change adaptation • Build the capacity and outreach stakeholders
  3. 3. Where Do We Work?
  4. 4. 40 SWAMP publications Peer-reviewed Journals Working papers  73,815 downloads  15,338 distributed
  5. 5. Why Mangroves? • Mangroves are important in the global carbon cycles • Very high C stocks (blue carbon), some of the highest on the planet • Highest rates in deforestation/land cover change in the tropics  GHG emissions • Mangroves provide numerous ecosystem services • Habitat for rare and endangered species • Coastal systems protect from storms and tsunamis and sea level rise • Breeding and rearing habitat for fish and shellfish • Sources of wood and other forest products • Ecotourism
  6. 6. Are mangroves forgotten ecosystem? Source: Friess et al. Conservation Biology (Accepted)
  7. 7. Mangroves vs Coral Reefs Nemo: Clown fish Habitat: Coral reefs Finding “Nemo” vs Finding “Dragon of Muds” Dragon of muds: Mudskipper Habitat: Mangroves VS
  8. 8. Finding mangrove: Why Indonesia? • 22.6% (2.9 Mha) of global mangroves • The highest deforestation rate in earth (52,000 ha/year) or 6% of national deforestation rates • Mainly are located in West Papua, Kalimantan dan Sumatra • About 50 mangrove tree species found and dominated by Rhizopora spp. Source: Giri et al. (2010); FAO (2007); Spalding et al. (1997) Sembilang Kubu Raya Tanjung Puting Cilacap Bunaken Teminabuan Bintuni Timika
  9. 9. How do we work? a “dirty” science
  10. 10. Donato et al. Nature Geoscience (2011) Findings: Indo-West Pacific
  11. 11. Our New Findings: Indonesia • Ecosystem C stocks 1,083 ± 378 Mg C ha–1 • Soil (78%) • Biomass (20%) • Necromass (2%) • Total stocks: 3.14 PgC • Area • 1980: 4.2 Mha (FAO 207) 40% loss • 2000: 3.1 Mha 52,000 ha/yr • 2005: 2.9 Mha (FAO, 2007) (1.4 %/yr) • 2009: 2.6 Mha (MoF, 2009) • Mangrove loss 6% of the total forest loss • CC mitigation potentials  0. 19 Pg CO2eq yr-1  19% of the total national GHG emissions Murdiyarso et al. Nature Climate Change (2015)
  12. 12. Mangrove C stocks across Indonesian archipelago Murdiyarso et al. Nature Climate Change (2015)
  13. 13. Land Use Emission Vs Aquaculture Expansion
  14. 14. NEW APPROACHES FOR RESTORATION AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT Photo by: Ben Brown Firewood ???$ Mangrove Crab ???$Ecotourism ??$  Integrating science with local objectives Bosma et al. 2014 Integrated Associated Separated Idealized?
  15. 15. Key messages • Mangroves are important in global carbon cycles and provide numerous ecosystem services • Mangroves are threatened ecosystem with low scientific recognition • Mangroves are one of the most carbon-richest ecosystem in the planet • Indonesian mangroves are matter for global climate change mitigation strategy • Mitigation-based adaptation may be promoted at all levels across multiple- stakeholders
  16. 16. Email: s.sasmito@cigar.org www.cifor.org/swamp http://blog.cifor.org/wetlands/ THANK YOU @sdsasmito

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