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Impacts of forest-based climate change mitigation strategies: understanding local perceptions of rural households in the Peruvian Amazon

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Impacts of forest-based climate change mitigation strategies: understanding local perceptions of rural households in the Peruvian Amazon

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Presented by Ana Cubas Baez (North Carolina State University) at 8th Annual Meeting of Forests and Livelihoods: FLARE 2022 on 8 October 2022

Presented by Ana Cubas Baez (North Carolina State University) at 8th Annual Meeting of Forests and Livelihoods: FLARE 2022 on 8 October 2022

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Impacts of forest-based climate change mitigation strategies: understanding local perceptions of rural households in the Peruvian Amazon

  1. 1. Impacts of forest-based climate change mitigation strategies: understanding local perceptions of rural households in the Peruvian Amazon Authors: Ana Cubas Baez and Dr. Erin Sills Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh, USA
  2. 2. I. Introduction • Tropical deforestation and degradation are among the main causes of climate change (Lofts et al., 2021; Muigua, 2021) • Reducing carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) was proposed in 2005 at the UN Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC) • REDD+ is also expected to provide social and economic benefits to local people and protect their livelihoods (REDD+ safeguards) • REDD+ is being piloted in hundreds of projects across the tropics Ⓒ https://www.climatecentral.org/climate-pact-sees-the-forest-for-the-trees/
  3. 3. Study Area Deforestation caused by illegal gold mining in the region of Madre de Dios. Ⓒ Costa (2018) Departments of Madre de Dios and Ucayali in the Peruvian Amazon Massive Cacao plantation in the Peruvian Amazon Ⓒ The Guardian (2015)
  4. 4. Research questions How do local households understand well-being? How does participation in REDD+ impact local well-being?
  5. 5. • Global Comparative Study (GCS) on REDD+ by the Center for International Forestry Research • Two sites: Madre de Dios and Ucayali • 8 villages in each site (4 intervention and 4 matched control) • Two group surveys (village and women) and a household survey in each of 3 phases Phase 1: 2009-2012 Phase 2: 2013-2015 Phase 3: 2016-2020 Type of village Ucayali Madre de Dios Intervention 4 villages 4 villages Control 4 villages 4 villages 8 villages 8 villages II. Methods Global Comparative study on REDD+ in Peru
  6. 6. Group interview level (meetings with villagers & women) Group meeting with women in Ucayali Source: Sills et al (2014) Fraction of households which had improved their well-being over time Household characteristics associated with higher well-being
  7. 7. Household Level (Household survey) (a) Changes in subjective well-being over time (b) Changes in characteristics associated with higher well-being Participation in REDD+ (a)Living in an intervention village, (b)Self-reported participation in REDD+, (c) Self-reported participation in the forest interventions implemented through the REDD+ projects We examined how measures of well-being were related to three types of participation in REDD+
  8. 8. III. Results Fraction of villages reporting changes in well-being … 1 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 Village intervention Village Control Women intervention Women control Madre de Dios Positive movement Negative movement Stayed the same 2 4 3 2 3 1 1 Village intervention Village Control Women intervention Women control Ucayali Positive movement Negative movement Stayed the same
  9. 9. Characteristics associated with higher well-being Madre de Dios Village Residency outside the community Diversification of the income sources Better transport and opportunities to travel Access to better markets Good education Good health United family with strong values Women Good quality of house construction material Education for children Ability to start own business or own a business Ownership of transport items
  10. 10. Village Sufficient food to eat Access to water Access to electricity Have a good job, be a worker. Good education Good health Access to technologies Good quality of house construction material. Women Education for children Good relationship with spouse Access to professional courses Have more possessions. Characteristics associated with higher well-being Ucayali
  11. 11. Impacts of participation in REDD+ on well-being Site 1: Madre de Dios Participation in REDD+ reduced households' subjective well-being. Site 2: Ucayali No statistically significant impact on subjective well- being. In both sites, perceptions of well-being were also influenced by the age, gender, education of the household head, adult members in the household, and access to utilities.
  12. 12. IV. Conclusion • Local perceptions of well-being are heterogeneous, varying by cultural context as well as gender. • Good education and good health are consistently associated with higher well-being. • There is little evidence that participation in REDD+ has improved well-being, from group interviews or from household reports of subjective well-being. • REDD+ implementers should take local perceptions of well-being into account when designing and monitoring interventions.
  13. 13. Acknowledgments Co-author: Dr. Erin Sills Contact information Ana Cubas Baez Email: anacubasbaez@gmail.com

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