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Landscape approaches 
to maximize social, economic and environmental outcomes 
Peter Holmgren, Director General CIFOR 
Asi...
Which 
outcomes? 
1. Improved 
Livelihoods 
2. Sustained 
ecosystem 
services 
4. Resource 
efficiency 
3. Food & non-food...
A common language for landscapes 
Outcomes, measures, performance 
• Easy to understand 
• Apply to any scale 
• Apply to ...
Better nutrition through safe drinking water 
– the case of Jakarta
Agriculture fires and expansion 
in Sumatra landscapes
Are landscapes important? 
1. Livelihood for billions of people 
2. Production of all our food 
• and other renewable prod...
Vision of our future? 
A planet with healthy landscapes.
Now some big-picture context.
Global developments 1960-2010 
Billion people
What to expect – 
innovation context 
 9.6 billion people in 2050 
 Changing consumption patterns 
 Continued economic ...
SDGs are proxies of the Outcomes we seek 
Forests / Landscapes significant to achieving each 
Draft SDGs as of July 2014. ...
Scaling up affordable and equitable finance for 
investing in sustainable land use 
 Investor: 
• A lot of capital ready ...
So. 
What is a ”landscape”? 
What is the ”landscape approach”? 
And how do we keep it simple enough?
Landscape = “Place with governance in place” 
Scale 
Formal 
Governance formalization 
Private 
farms, 
forests 
Districts...
On the “Landscape approach” 
 Landscapes have in common: 
• multiple stakeholders 
• multiple purposes / goals 
 The Lan...
So, “Landscape approach” to “maximize outcomes”…
Global 
Landscapes 
Forum 
6-7 Dec 2014 
Lima, Peru 
landscapes.org
#thinklandscape 
Take-home messages 
1. Healthy Landscapes are fundamental for our future. 
2. Landscape approach does not...
Landscape approaches to maximize social, economic and environmental outcomes - Peter Holmgren CIFOR
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Landscape approaches to maximize social, economic and environmental outcomes - Peter Holmgren CIFOR

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CIFOR Director General Peter Holmgren's keynote speech at the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Stakeholder Dialogue in Sydney, Australia, 11 November 2014.

Holmgren presents the importance of landscape approaches for meeting sustainable development goals and maintaining a healthy balance in land use decision making - to emphasize how the world's future can be maximized for food security, biodiversity conservation, economic stability and human health.

Learn more about landscapes at http://www.landscapes.org

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Landscape approaches to maximize social, economic and environmental outcomes - Peter Holmgren CIFOR

  1. 1. Landscape approaches to maximize social, economic and environmental outcomes Peter Holmgren, Director General CIFOR Asia-Pacific Rainforest Stakeholder Dialogue Sydney, 11 November 2014
  2. 2. Which outcomes? 1. Improved Livelihoods 2. Sustained ecosystem services 4. Resource efficiency 3. Food & non-food products
  3. 3. A common language for landscapes Outcomes, measures, performance • Easy to understand • Apply to any scale • Apply to any location • Measurable • Sustainability can mean improvement over time • Enabling conditions for scaling up private finance & investments
  4. 4. Better nutrition through safe drinking water – the case of Jakarta
  5. 5. Agriculture fires and expansion in Sumatra landscapes
  6. 6. Are landscapes important? 1. Livelihood for billions of people 2. Production of all our food • and other renewable products (wood, non-wood) 3. Source of 1/3 of greenhouse gas emissions (land use) 4. Home to all terrestrial biodiversity 5. Cornerstone in a green economy Yes. They are important. Very important.
  7. 7. Vision of our future? A planet with healthy landscapes.
  8. 8. Now some big-picture context.
  9. 9. Global developments 1960-2010 Billion people
  10. 10. What to expect – innovation context  9.6 billion people in 2050  Changing consumption patterns  Continued economic growth  Expectations of justice and equity  Migrations to seek new opportunities  Increased climate variability Only 30-40 years ahead, the world will not look like today. Next steps: SDGs and COP21, Paris
  11. 11. SDGs are proxies of the Outcomes we seek Forests / Landscapes significant to achieving each Draft SDGs as of July 2014. Note! Not final. 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts* 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development
  12. 12. Scaling up affordable and equitable finance for investing in sustainable land use  Investor: • A lot of capital ready for good investment propositions that also contribute to sustainable development  Farmers / Producers / Protectors: • Access to long-term, affordable and reliable capital is a major limiting factor for our enterprises  Public sector: • Desire to use public funds for demonstrable results in delivering public goods and sustainable development  Connecting the dots: a Landscape Fund
  13. 13. So. What is a ”landscape”? What is the ”landscape approach”? And how do we keep it simple enough?
  14. 14. Landscape = “Place with governance in place” Scale Formal Governance formalization Private farms, forests Districts, Provinces, Major cities Communal land Biosphere reserves, Model forests Countries Municipalities Producer cooperatives Land-related international conventions Local Global Informal Corporations Protected areas Earth Major watersheds Public forests
  15. 15. On the “Landscape approach”  Landscapes have in common: • multiple stakeholders • multiple purposes / goals  The Landscape approach is about: • negotiating values, priorites and trade-offs - comparing apples and pears! • taking action • evaluating progress • with a general view to “maximize outcomes”
  16. 16. So, “Landscape approach” to “maximize outcomes”…
  17. 17. Global Landscapes Forum 6-7 Dec 2014 Lima, Peru landscapes.org
  18. 18. #thinklandscape Take-home messages 1. Healthy Landscapes are fundamental for our future. 2. Landscape approach does not seek to replace existing institutions, sectors or processes, but to connect them. 3. Landscape approach is about negotiation 4. Keep it simple. 5. Embrace diversity of solutions. 6. Make it attractive to mainstream politics and finance.

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