Gender, Tenure andCommunity Forests inUganda and Nicaragua  Anne Larson & Esther Mwangi         Rio de Janeiro         20 ...
Goal of the research§  To improve women s rights to    forest resources and    livelihoods through increased    participa...
Background§  Nicaragua                    §  Uganda    •  RAAN, indigenous              •  Mpigi, Masaka, Rakai      com...
Specific activities§  understanding obstacles at multiple levels    (research)§  experimenting with a community level   ...
Why? Our theory of change:§  careful coordination between research and action  partners and men and women in communities§...
Research…§  Obstacles to women s participation in decisions   •  Nicaragua: “forests and gender” only being considered   ...
… to action (1)Adaptive Collaborative Management:     Facilitation of processes to implement self-identified     solutions...
Research to action (2)Promoting uptake: “advisory committee”§  Rationale:   •  a group of people for continued dialogue o...
Results so far§  Guide and advise research§  Propose ways in which research findings can be used,    presented§  Identi...
Research to action (3)Assessing influence   •    Perceptions of communities, policy makers, practitioners before        (a...
Opportunities and challenges§  Challenging to integrate all of these pieces, very important to  work through committed, e...
Opportunities and      Challenges§  Understanding what policy  makers really need to make  change is not so clear when it...
In conclusion§  Changes in policies and legal frameworks are a good    start. But implementation is still weak.§  Bureau...
Questions for discussion§  Using research to change deep seated beliefs (policy      level, community level)§    Conditi...
Thank	  you!	                      THINKING beyond the canopy
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Gender, tenure and community forests in Uganda and Nicaragua

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In Uganda and Nicaragua, as in many countries, women are still shut out of forestry decisions at all levels – despite everyone agreeing that women’s participation is important. How can we ensure that gender mainstreaming is ‘process-oriented’ rather than merely ‘ticking boxes’? This presentation focuses on a project in Uganda and Nicaragua aimed at improving women's participation.

CIFOR scientist Anne Larson gave this presentation on 20 June 2012 at a Rio+20 side event titled ‘Linking policy, practice and research for gender-responsive change in forestry’. The side event aimed to promote discussion and the exchange of ideas on concrete ways to address gender inequalities at different governance levels in forestry research and practice, and the risks and opportunities associated with different strategies and choice of partners.

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Gender, tenure and community forests in Uganda and Nicaragua

  1. Gender, Tenure andCommunity Forests inUganda and Nicaragua Anne Larson & Esther Mwangi Rio de Janeiro 20 Junio, 2012
  2. Goal of the research§  To improve women s rights to forest resources and livelihoods through increased participation in decision making§  To enhance stakeholder uptake of policies, practices and strategies to promote women s participation THINKING beyond the canopy
  3. Background§  Nicaragua §  Uganda •  RAAN, indigenous •  Mpigi, Masaka, Rakai communities in 5 districts territories •  State forests •  Titled communal •  Specific mention of territories non-discrimination, •  No specific mention of women’s participation, gender in forest policy, affirmative action, though gender equity overcoming gender is general principle barrier, etc. in Forest Policy and others THINKING beyond the canopy
  4. Specific activities§  understanding obstacles at multiple levels (research)§  experimenting with a community level process to overcome obstacles (ACM)§  promoting uptake of different vision/ perspectives, policies and methods at multiple levels (advisory committee)§  measuring impact/influence (our success at the two previous points) THINKING beyond the canopy
  5. Why? Our theory of change:§  careful coordination between research and action partners and men and women in communities§  joint priority setting, open information flows, local problem solving, and capacity building§  multiple levels of engagement THINKING beyond the canopy
  6. Research…§  Obstacles to women s participation in decisions •  Nicaragua: “forests and gender” only being considered now, very incipient, and women are shut out of forestry decisions at all levels •  Uganda: in spite of legal framework, policies and strategies, women are shut out of forestry decisions at all levels THINKING beyond the canopy
  7. … to action (1)Adaptive Collaborative Management: Facilitation of processes to implement self-identified solutions to forest-related problems focusing on women’s inclusion and/or improved participation (next presentation) THINKING beyond the canopy
  8. Research to action (2)Promoting uptake: “advisory committee”§  Rationale: •  a group of people for continued dialogue on the project ideas § to give feedback, § to disseminate findings, and § to talk to each other.§  Who? §  Policy makers (central, local), NGO representatives, researchers THINKING beyond the canopy
  9. Results so far§  Guide and advise research§  Propose ways in which research findings can be used, presented§  Identify opportunities for funding women s/community projects§  Help meet demand for services by women/ communities —mostly tree planting (seedlings, training)§  Identify opportunities for linking with other actors THINKING beyond the canopy
  10. Research to action (3)Assessing influence •  Perceptions of communities, policy makers, practitioners before (and after) research: attitudes AND behavior •  Community level survey before (and after) THINKING beyond the canopy
  11. Opportunities and challenges§  Challenging to integrate all of these pieces, very important to work through committed, engaged and embedded local/ regional/ national institutions§  Advisory committee meetings not as frequent as we would like, but there is a lot of contact between meetings THINKING beyond the canopy
  12. Opportunities and Challenges§  Understanding what policy makers really need to make change is not so clear when it comes to gender (culture, biases, deep-seated beliefs) – everyone agrees that women s participation is important , but… THINKING beyond the canopy
  13. In conclusion§  Changes in policies and legal frameworks are a good start. But implementation is still weak.§  Bureaucrats need budgets, clear strategies, training and monitoring§  Having impact commonly involves providing data and information (research) and challenging interests (political economy), but with gender issues it also involves challenging attitudes and deep-seated beliefs§  What is the best way for researchers to do this? THINKING beyond the canopy
  14. Questions for discussion§  Using research to change deep seated beliefs (policy level, community level)§  Conditions under which ACM will work§  How ensure sustainability beyond the time of facilitation§  Women as representatives of women s interests§  Changing the perception of youth§  How ensure gender mainstreaming be process oriented rather than merely tick boxes ? THINKING beyond the canopy
  15. Thank  you!   THINKING beyond the canopy

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