Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
From Principle to Practice 
Achieving Coastal Mitigation and Adaptation Outcomes 
through Demonstration Projects and Upsca...
Importance of coastal wetlands 
Seagrass beds, mangroves, and other intertidal vegetated habitats 
deliver among the highe...
Opportunities 
2011: ‘wetland drainage and rewetting’ eligible 
activity under KP => step towards integration 
of wetlands...
Opportunities 
Great potential for management and restoration 
of coastal wetlands under REDD+ and NAMAs 
Many REDD and NA...
Distils best practice principles for 
coastal wetland carbon projects 
Drawing on wetlands restoration, 
terrestrial carbo...
Blue Carbon in UNEP’s work 
Mandate 
Keep the world environment under review; Catalyze and promote international cooperati...
UNEP Blue Carbon Initiative 
Develop methodologies and tools for valuation of carbon and other ecosystem services 
=> appl...
Delivery and uptake 
global community to develop tools and approaches and share lessons learned 
regional adoption, dissem...
UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project 
“Blue Forests” - coastal carbon and related ecosystem services 
coastal ecosystem managemen...
UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project 
Component 1. Development of guidance and methodologies for project support 
Component 2. Sm...
Blue Forests Project Global Reach
• UNEP 
• GRID-Arendal 
• UNEP-WCMC 
• Duke University 
• IUCN 
• Blue Ventures 
• Conservation International 
• WWF 
• AG...
www.bluecarbonportal.org
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

From Principle to Practice: Achieving Coastal Mitigation and Adaptation Outcomes through Demonstration Projects and Upscaling

2,571 views

Published on

This presentation was given by Tim Christophersen at a UNFCCC COP20 side-event titled "Guiding Principles for Delivering Coastal Wetland Carbon Projects” in Lima, Peru.

Coastal wetland ecosystems play a significant role in sequestering and storing carbon in biomass and soils. These ecosystems, however, are facing tremendous pressure and large portion of them are already degraded due to unsustainable cuttings and aquaculture development. This panel discussed options for policy and practice for improving sustainability and realizing the full mitigation and adaptation potential of coastal wetland ecosystems.

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

From Principle to Practice: Achieving Coastal Mitigation and Adaptation Outcomes through Demonstration Projects and Upscaling

  1. 1. From Principle to Practice Achieving Coastal Mitigation and Adaptation Outcomes through Demonstration Projects and Upscaling Side Event, UNFCCC CoP 20, 9 December 2014 Tim Christophersen, Jerker Tamelander, Takehiro Nakamura, UNEP © J Tamelander
  2. 2. Importance of coastal wetlands Seagrass beds, mangroves, and other intertidal vegetated habitats deliver among the highest ecosystem service values of all natural systems Half of the world’s mangrove forest and tidal marsh area has been lost, and the global area of seagrass has declined by a third in the past century © J Tamelander
  3. 3. Opportunities 2011: ‘wetland drainage and rewetting’ eligible activity under KP => step towards integration of wetlands in future global mitigation architecture 2013: Wetlands Supplement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories => Parties can account for all sinks and emissions from any wetlands Paris CoP may agree to include blue carbon as a whole, or certain blue carbon, in a comprehensive accounting and crediting framework under UNFCCC © J Tamelander
  4. 4. Opportunities Great potential for management and restoration of coastal wetlands under REDD+ and NAMAs Many REDD and NAMA readiness activities pave the way, e.g. institutions, land inventories, tenure allocations, policy mainstreaming CDM methodology for mangrove afforestation and reforestation - but excludes conservation and generates only temporary carbon credits Voluntary carbon markets provide ample opportunity, e.g. >15 relevant VCS AFOLU methodologies, > 80 individual projects © J Tamelander
  5. 5. Distils best practice principles for coastal wetland carbon projects Drawing on wetlands restoration, terrestrial carbon projects, carbon policy and community engagement Targeted at practitioners familiar with carbon project and policy development or wetlands restoration Gives guidance on additional requirements for successful coastal wetland or ‘blue carbon’ interventions Ensures intervention are feasible, scalable, and provide intended benefits
  6. 6. Blue Carbon in UNEP’s work Mandate Keep the world environment under review; Catalyze and promote international cooperation and action; Facilitate development of standards and norms; Capacity support Medium Term Strategy 2014-2017 Climate Change; Disasters and Conflicts; Ecosystem Management; Chemicals and Wastes; Resource Efficiency; Environmental Governance; Environment under Review Programme of Work 2014-2015 Climate Change a) Ecosystem-based adaptation approaches implemented and integrated into key strategies c) Transformative REDD+ strategies and finance approaches developed and implemented Ecosystem Management: b) Use of ecosystem approach to sustain coastal and marine ecosystem services increased c) Services and benefits from ecosystems integrated in development planning and accounting
  7. 7. UNEP Blue Carbon Initiative Develop methodologies and tools for valuation of carbon and other ecosystem services => application in planning and management Policy analysis and dialogue => adoption of methodologies, tools and policy frameworks => create incentives for sustainable use of blue carbon ecosystem services Fill knowledge gaps => Targeted research on ecosystem services provided by coastal wetlands Communication => Provide information to a wide audience, create enabling environment
  8. 8. Delivery and uptake global community to develop tools and approaches and share lessons learned regional adoption, dissemination and capacity building through Regional Seas Conventions and Action Plans national pilot testing and demonstration implementation
  9. 9. UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project “Blue Forests” - coastal carbon and related ecosystem services coastal ecosystem management harnessing the values associated with carbon sequestration and storage and other ecosystem services USD 4.5M over 4 years, with over USD 23M cofinance © J Tamelander
  10. 10. UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project Component 1. Development of guidance and methodologies for project support Component 2. Small-scale interventions: – Improving understanding of carbon and ecosystem services – Improving capacity for ecosystem management of blue forests – Target countries: Madagascar, Ecuador, Mozambique, Indonesia, UAE – Replication and scaling-up: e.g. Kenya; Central America Component 3. Improved understanding through targeted research Component 4. Adoption of methodologies and approaches for greater policy and GEF IW uptake Component 5. Monitoring, networking and information sharing
  11. 11. Blue Forests Project Global Reach
  12. 12. • UNEP • GRID-Arendal • UNEP-WCMC • Duke University • IUCN • Blue Ventures • Conservation International • WWF • AGEDI • Indonesia Ministry of Marine Affairs And Fisheries • UNEP-ROLAC • Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute • US Forest Service • South African Institute of International Affairs • The Ocean Foundation • NOAA • Stockholm University • Charles Darwin University Blue Forests Project Partners
  13. 13. www.bluecarbonportal.org

×