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Terry Sunderland, Principal Scientist, CIFOR
ISCC Technical Committee Meeting Southeast Asia
7th Meeting
October 25, 2017
...
FORESTS IN LANDSCAPES: WHAT DO WE KNOW?
• One billion+ people rely on forest products
for consumption and income in some w...
HOW DO FORESTED LANDSCAPES
SUPPORT DIETARY DIVERSITY?
• Direct
• Indirect
• Multiple pathways
ZONES OF AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION
WHAT HAPPENS TO DIETS AND
LIVELIHOODS WHEN THIS HAPPENS?
THE “INDOMIE-ISATION” OF DIETS
“Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural
tree crop plantations were all associated with mor...
FORESTS SUSTAINING AGRICULTURE
How does landscape configuration maximise the provision of these
goods and services for bot...
“When incorporating forests and trees within an appropriate and
contextualized natural resource management strategy, there...
THINKING beyond the canopy
OUR LAB
11
Grand Challenge:
Managing complex landscape mosaics that
contribute to ecosystem ser...
OPERATIONALISING THE LANDSCAPE APPROACH:
FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE
THEORY & POLICY
PRACTICE:
Integration &
evaluation
Local ...
FORESTS AND LANDSCAPES: WHAT VISION?
• Diverse forest and tree-based production systems offer
advantages over monocropping...
THINKING beyond the canopy
t.sunderland@cgiar.org
@TCHSunderland
Changing landscapes: From forests to food
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Changing landscapes: From forests to food

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Presented by Terry Sunderland, from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), at the 7th ISCC Technical Committee Meeting Southeast Asia in Jakarta, Indonesia, on October 25, 2017.

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Changing landscapes: From forests to food

  1. 1. Terry Sunderland, Principal Scientist, CIFOR ISCC Technical Committee Meeting Southeast Asia 7th Meeting October 25, 2017 Jakarta, Indonesia CHANGING LANDSCAPES: FROM FORESTS TO FOOD
  2. 2. FORESTS IN LANDSCAPES: WHAT DO WE KNOW? • One billion+ people rely on forest products for consumption and income in some way (Agrawal et al. 2013) • Safety-net during times of food and income insecurity (Wunder et al. 2014) • Wild harvested meat and freshwater fish provides 30-80% of protein intake for many rural communities (Nasi et al. 2011; McIntyre et al. 2016) • 75% of world’s population rely on biodiversity for primary health care (WHO, 2003) • 40%-80% of global food production comes from diverse smallholder agricultural systems in complex landscapes (FAO 2011; IFAD 2016) • Long tradition of managing forests for food – e.g. shifting cultivation (van Vliet et al. 2011) • Forests sustaining agriculture through ecosystem services provision (Reed et al. 2017)
  3. 3. HOW DO FORESTED LANDSCAPES SUPPORT DIETARY DIVERSITY? • Direct • Indirect • Multiple pathways
  4. 4. ZONES OF AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION
  5. 5. WHAT HAPPENS TO DIETS AND LIVELIHOODS WHEN THIS HAPPENS?
  6. 6. THE “INDOMIE-ISATION” OF DIETS
  7. 7. “Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to reconsider their views on this land use”. Ickowitz et al., 2016
  8. 8. FORESTS SUSTAINING AGRICULTURE How does landscape configuration maximise the provision of these goods and services for both forestry and food production??? Water regulation Climate regulation Pollination Pest control
  9. 9. “When incorporating forests and trees within an appropriate and contextualized natural resource management strategy, there is potential to maintain, and in some cases, enhance agricultural yields comparable to solely monoculture systems”. Reed et al. 2017
  10. 10. THINKING beyond the canopy OUR LAB 11 Grand Challenge: Managing complex landscape mosaics that contribute to ecosystem services, livelihoods and biodiversity
  11. 11. OPERATIONALISING THE LANDSCAPE APPROACH: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE THEORY & POLICY PRACTICE: Integration & evaluation Local stakeholders: NGO’s; CSO’s Local communities Private sector Local government Drivers: Researchers Policy makers Central government
  12. 12. FORESTS AND LANDSCAPES: WHAT VISION? • Diverse forest and tree-based production systems offer advantages over monocropping systems because of their adaptability and resilience. • There are a multitude of ecosystem services provided by forests and trees that simultaneously support food production, nutrition, sustainability and environmental and human health. • Managing landscapes on a multi-functional basis that combines food production, biodiversity conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services can contribute to food and nutritional security • Forests and trees alone will not achieve global food security, but can play a major role: discourse has started to change • Therefore, is “business as usual” an acceptable strategy?
  13. 13. THINKING beyond the canopy t.sunderland@cgiar.org @TCHSunderland

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