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The Path Forward: Heat - Vivek Shandas Slides

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The Path Forward: Heat - Vivek Shandas Slides

  1. 1. Toward Health Equity on a Warming Planet Engaging Communities in Addressing Urban Heat Vivek Shandas, Professor Portland State University
  2. 2. The Climate Age Source: Yale e360, NOAA
  3. 3. Experiences Today
  4. 4. Urban heat is a key urban policy challenge Policymakers and health care practitioners often lack evidence on urban heat and its impacts.
  5. 5. Historic Trauma
  6. 6. Case study: Richmond, Virginia (USA). Detailed heat data generated through a citizen heat watch campaign showed temperature differences exceeding 18-degrees Fahrenheit.
  7. 7. Case study: Richmond, USA Heat difference of up to 10C: low- income and minority neighborhoods most affected. Detailed heat mapping pinpoints the influence of tree cover and impervious surfaces.
  8. 8. Case study: Richmond, USA Heat difference of up to 10C: low- income and minority neighborhoods most affected. Detailed heat mapping pinpoints the influence of tree cover and impervious surfaces.
  9. 9. Case study: Richmond, USA Heat difference of up to 10C: low- income and minority neighborhoods most affected. Detailed heat mapping pinpoints the influence of tree cover and impervious surfaces.
  10. 10. Limited Change Impervious Tree Canopy Conscious and Deliberate Planning 1. Greater amount of asphalt and pavement 2. Highway projects and big box stores 3. Large-scale housing projects 4. Industrial facilities 5. Lack of parks and green spaces https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?useExisting= 1&layers=ef0f926eb1b146d082c38cc35b53c947 Interactive Map Link
  11. 11. Conscious and Deliberate Planning 1. Greater amount of asphalt and pavement 2. Highway projects and big box stores 3. Large-scale housing projects 4. Industrial facilities 5. Lack of parks and green spaces Hoffman, Shandas, & Pendelton, 2020 Impervious Tree Canopy
  12. 12. Redlining & Temperature Differences Hoffman, Shandas, & Pendelton, 2020
  13. 13. Gentrification? Population Change (1980 – 2016)
  14. 14. Current Approach Satellite Images Strengths 1. Freely available for all regions of the world 2. Seasonal variability 3. Intra-urban variation in temperatures observable 4. Extensive literature and research 5. Potential connections to land use Weaknesses 1. Exaggerates temperature ranges 2. Coarse pixel sizes 3. Rooftops, not experiential 4. Discrete differences between land covers 5. Translation to policy remains unclear
  15. 15. Heat Watch Engagement Model Engage communities in describing and localizing climate-induced hazards Develop analytical tools for examining scenarios of adaptation actions Support capacity building efforts through engagement of decision makers and community groups
  16. 16. How it Works Engage Locally Collaborate with social/environmental justice organizations and individuals to support heat action Complete Campaign Use materials provided to engage volunteers in Heat Watch campaign Review Results & Identify Actions Deepen engagement through active involvement in heat planning
  17. 17. Campaign Planning
  18. 18. Implementing a community-based urban heat assessment
  19. 19. Report output
  20. 20. Web map output https://arcg.is/LzPjT
  21. 21. Promising Directions
  22. 22. Contact Vivek Shandas vshandas@pdx.edu

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