Dryland Systems – Presentation for Discussion with Donors and Partners – June 2013

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Dryland Systems – Presentation for Discussion with Donors and Partners – June 2013

  1. 1. The global research partnership to improve agricultural productivity and income in the worlds dry areasDryland SystemsIntegrated Production Systems for Improving Food Security andLivelihoods in Dry Areas
  2. 2. The SRF (CGIAR 2011) advocates threeadditional areas of core competencyto accomplish impact on the fourstrategicOne is Development of corecompetency in the area of productionsystemsThis will test the ability of the systemto undertake inter-center research.Systems research will integratecommodity, natural resourcemanagement and policy research toimprove productivity and livelihoodsin a sustainable manner at thenational and regional levelSTRATEGIC AND RESULTS FRAMEWORK
  3. 3. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Drylands Systems• Dryland Systems targets the poor and highlyvulnerable populations of dry areas and theagricultural systems on which they depend• Dryland Systems was developed from SRF ThematicArea 1, “Integrated Agricultural Systems for the Poorand Vulnerable.”• Such systems are characterized by major constraints,such as drought or other agroclimatic challenges, poorinfrastructure and underdeveloped markets, or weakinstitutions and governance.
  4. 4. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013TitleProminant Features of Drylands
  5. 5. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title CGIAR System Level Outcomes• Reduced rural poverty;• Improved food security;• Better nutrition and health; and• Sustainable management ofnatural resources.
  6. 6. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013TitleConceptual Research FrameworkSRT2: Reducingvulnerability and managingriskSRT3: Sustainableintensification for moreproductive, profitable anddiversified drylandagriculture with well-established linkages tomarketst
  7. 7. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Cross-Cutting Themes• Gender• Youth• Biodiversity• Capacity building
  8. 8. Partnership in Dryland Systems• Part of conceptualframework Consultativeselection of Action Sites• Groundwork in 5regions to characterizeTarget Areas• Prioritize research inRegional InceptionWorkshops• Partnership ingovernance• Need to outscale
  9. 9. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013Title Inception Phase• Groundwork for baselinecharacterization• Workshops to setResearch PrioritiesCommon Ground1) 21 Constraints2) 20 Outputs3) 16 Hypotheses4) 20 Outcomes
  10. 10. TitleTHEORY of CHANGEKey elements of the agricultural system interact to improvehuman welfare and management of natural resources
  11. 11. TitleIntermediate Development OutcomesThe first 4 target direct impact on wellbeing and sustaining naturalresource base:1. More resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households in marginal areas.2. More stable and higher per capita income for intensifiable households.3. Women and children in vulnerable households have year round accessto greater quantity and diversity of food sources.4. More sustainable and equitable management of land and waterresources in pastoral and agropastoral.The rest relate to requirements for the first 4 to be realized:5. Better functioning markets underpinning intensification of rurallivelihoods.6. More integrated, effective and connected service delivery institutionsunderpinning resilience and system intensification.7. Policy reform removing constraints and creating incentives for ruralhouseholds to engage in more sustainable practices that improveresilience and intensify production.
  12. 12. Abbreviated LabelRuralPovertyFoodSecurityNutri-tionHealthSustain-ableNRMGender YouthBio-diversityCapacityBuildingRESILIENCEINTENSIFICATIONWomen and children invulnerable households haveyear round access to greaterquantity and diversity ofNUTRITION forVulnerableMore sustainable andequitable management ofland and water resources inpastoral and agropastoral.Sustainable NRMManagementBetter functioning marketsunderpinning intensificationof rural livelihoods.Marketsintegrated, effective andconnected service deliveryinstitutions underpinningresilience and systemDelivery InstitutionsPolicy reform removingconstraints and creatingincentives for ruralhouseholds to engage inPolicySystem Level OutoutsIDO Cross-Cutting ThemesMore resilient livelihoodsfor vulnerable householdsin marginal areas.More stable and higherper capita income forintensifiable households.
  13. 13. IncomeFoodSecurityConsump-tionProduct-vityControl ofAssetsCapacity toInnovateCapacityto AdaptGreaterResiliencePoliciesEnviron-mentCarbonSequest-rationRESILIENCEINTENSIFICATIONNUTRITION forVulnerableSustainable NRMManagementMarketsDelivery InstitutionsPolicySystem Level IDOsCRP IDO AbbreviatedLabel
  14. 14. Impacts from IDOs1. More resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households in marginal areas.2. More stable and higher per capita income for intensifiable households(those above an asset threshold that makes intensification a viableoption).3. Women and children in vulnerable households have year round access togreater quantity and diversity of food sources4. More sustainable and equitable management of land and waterresources in pastoral and agropastoral areas5. Better functioning markets underpinning intensification of rurallivelihoods6. More integrated, effective and connected service delivery institutionsunderpinning resilience and system intensification7. Policy reform removing constraints and incentivising rural households toengage in more sustainable practices that intensify and improveresilience and intensify production
  15. 15. ImpactMore resilient livelihoods for vulnerablehouseholds in marginal areasOutputs• Improved resilience options (components, interactions and their management;explicit consideration of buffer functions, managing trade-offs between productionand risk; nested scale risk mitigation, including incentives to adopt them)• Tools, methods, processes and capacity of NARES to create and customiseimproved resilience options to local circumstances across scaling domainsOutcomeNARES use tools, methods and processes togenerate and customise improved resilienceoptions for targeted groups of vulnerablehouseholdsIndicatorsUse of outputs: number and size oforganisations using them and their arealand population domains; proportion ofsector in targeted areas this representsCustomised options: number of optionsand number of hh targetedResilience index: contextualisedmultiscale assessment of resiliencebuilding strategies at householdand community levels (seeMarschke, and Berkes. 2006)
  16. 16. ImpactMore stable and higher per capita income forintensifiable householdsOutputs• Improved intensification options (components, interactions and theirmanagement; information on investment costs, returns and risk; risk mitigation)• Tools, methods, processes and capacity of NARES1 to create and customiseimproved intensification options to local circumstances across scaling domainsOutcomeNARES1 use tools, methods and processes togenerate and customise improved intensificationoptions for targeted groups of intesifiablehouseholdsIndicatorsIncrease: i)absolute increase, ii)%increase, iii) % of hh above povertythresholdStability: iv)variance in per capita annualincome (nine year rolling); v)trend in iiiUse of outputs: number and size oforganisations using them and their arealand population domains; proportion ofsector in targeted areas this representsCustomised options: number of optionsand number of hh targeted
  17. 17. ImpactWomen and children in vulnerable householdshave year round access to greater quantity anddiversity of food sourcesOutputs• Diagnosis and identification of constraints and opportunities of local food systemsleading to improved year round access to food and diversified diets• Systematic research on interventions to address identified constraints andopportunities, leading to a matrix of tested interventions and delivery strategiesassociated with the contexts in which they workOutcomeNARES and health sector organisations worktogether and adopt diagnostic and systematicresearch approaches to promoting anddeveloping interventions to improve vulnerablewomen and children’s access to, and control of,more and more diverse food sources,throughout the yearIndicatorsDietary diversity: i)time concentrationindex of number of food groups andindividual foods consumed by womenand children in sample hh ii)proportionof women and children above thresholddietary diversity in target communities.Integration: network strength amongstagricultural and health workers andorganisationsAdoption: number and size oforganisations, their areal and populationdomains; proportion of sector intargeted areas this representsInterventions: number of interventionsand number of hh they target
  18. 18. ImpactMore sustainable and equitable managementof land and water resources in pastoral andagropastoral areasOutputs• Technologies, tools, methods, processes and approaches developed and tested forevidence-based ecosystem management• Focus on negotiation support (amongst stakeholders) and governance modelsOutcomeMultiple stakeholders (gender, age) in pastoral /agropastoral areas , use evidence-basedecosystem management, at community level inthe governance of common and privatelymanaged land and water resourcesIndicatorsArea: i)ha and proportion of target areaunder governance arrangementsmeeting equity standards set a prioriPeople: ii)gender-disaggregated numberof people and proportion of targetpopulation encompassed by land area ini)Use of outputs: number and size ofcommunities adopting evidence basedgovernance models developed by DSEffect: trends in NVDI over time for areasunder and outside new governancemodels
  19. 19. ImpactBetter functioning markets underpinintensification of rural livelihoodsOutputs– Modes of operation to lower transaction costs through development ofassembly points and market hubs– More innovative partnership models involving entrepreneurs, marketingcommissions, traders and warrantage (inventory credit systems)– Improved market information systemsOutcomeFarmers and pastoralists (especially women)have better access to more diverse, efficientand equitable marketsIndicatorsEfficiency: trend in average transactioncost for key marketed productsEquity: proportion of product valueaccruing to rural householdsAccess: Gender disaggregated numbersof people and proportions of targetpopulation with access to betterfunctioning markets
  20. 20. ImpactMore integrated, effective and connectedservice delivery institutions underpinningsystem intensification and resilienceOutputs– Improved and innovative extension methods better targeted to message andcontext and tools to assist in selection of appropriate methods– Improved models for interaction amongst service providers to enableintegration of service provision amongst sectors– Innovative public-private partnership models for service deliveryOutcomeService providers adopt innovations to improvetheir effectiveness, integration and reachIndicatorsReach: gender disaggregated numbersand proportions of people and ruralhouseholds accessing servicesUptake: Number and proportion ofservice provider using models andmethods developed by Dryland Systems
  21. 21. ImpactRemoval of constraints and incentives lead torural households engaging in more sustainablepractices that increase resilience and intensifyproductionOutputs– Analysis of policy and institutional barriers to adoption of sustainableintensification options– Ex-ante analysis and other quantified impact of effectiveness of policyalternatives– Policy briefs providing evidence targeting key fora for policy changeOutcomePolicy makers reform and institutionsimplement policies that remove constraints to,and improve incentives for, rationalmanagement of natural resourcesIndicatorsEffect: numbers and proportions (withintarget areas) of rural householdsadopting more sustainable practicesPolicy: documented change in policiesand the number and proportions ofpeople and area potentially affectedImplementation: assessment of policyimplementation
  22. 22. The global research partnership to improve agricultural productivity and income in the worlds dry areasRegions: «Flagships» and Partners
  23. 23. West Africa & Dry SavannasRegional:FARA,CORAF CILSSBurkina Faso:INERAGhana: SARI,CSIRMali: IERNiger: INRANNigeria: ARC SRT2: the KKM (Kano-Katsina-Maradi) action transect SRT3: the WBS (Wa-Bobo-Sikasso) action transect
  24. 24. South Asia• Rajasthan (SRT2)• Chakwal, Pakistan assatellite site, mainlySRT2• Bijapur, Karnataka,India , SRT3 (blacksoils).• Anantapur & Kurnool,Andhra PradeshSRT2/3 (red soils)• Maharashtra/Karnataka Pradesh,satellite SRT3Regional: Asia-Pacific Association of Agricultural Research InstitutionsBangladesh: BARIIndia: ICAR, CRIDA, CAZRI, FES, NRAA, Watershed Organization TrustPakistan: BARI, CSO, PARC, SSD
  25. 25. Central Asia and CaucasusSRT2: Aral Sea Basin and Rasht ValleySRT3: Fergana ValleyCentral Asia and Caucasus:Regional ForaKazakhstan: South-Western ScientificProduction Center ofAgricultureTajikistan: TAASTurkmenistan: NationalFarmers’ Association, NASUzbekistan: KashkadaryaResearch Institute
  26. 26. North Africa and West Asia• SRT2: Jordan/Syria;• SRT2: Satellite: Béni Khedache-Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia• SRT3: Mekness region of Morocco; Egypt Nile delta• SRT3 Satellites: Karkheh River Basin, IranRegional: Associationof Agriculture ResearchInstitutions in the NearEast & North Africa.Egypt: ARCJordan: NCAREMorocco: INRASyria: GCSAR, AghaKhan FoundationTunisia: IRA
  27. 27. East & Southern AfricaSRT2: Northeastern Kenya and Southeastern EthiopiaSRT3: Chinyanja Triangle (central and southern Malawi, easternprovince of Zambia, and the Tete Province of MozambiqueEast and Southern Africa:Regional: Association forStrengthening AgriculturalResearch in Eastern andCentral AfricaEthiopia: EIARKenya: KARISouth Africa: CSIR, Univ. ofFt Hare, WRCSudan: ARCZambia: University ofZambia
  28. 28. The global research partnership to improve agricultural productivity and income in the worlds dry areasCross-cutting Themes andProgram-level Tools• Gender• Youth• Biodiversity• Capacitybuilding• Modeling• Geoinformatics• ResearchSupportSystems
  29. 29. Gender And Youth Matter• Land tenure• Access to financial tools• Employment• Decision-making• Natural resource access(trees, fields)• Food preparation andprocessing• Household nutrition• Varietal assessment• Use of disposable income• Landed and Landless labor
  30. 30. MarketsMicrobe-plantCommunity,watershed,region…Farm, household,livelihood…Field, flock, forestMarketsGeoinformaticsIntegrated Models andDecision SupportSystemsDataToolsTrainingCollaboration
  31. 31. Research Support NetworkSSC@ReadingIASRIICARDAIRLIICRAFResearchsupport incountriesICRISATUniversitiesA network of research supportteams that share resources andcommunicate to make thesupport available to scientistsmore effective and efficient.Initially this includes CGIARresearch support teams andstatisticians, but is expected togrow to include institutions andunits that work in-country so as tohelp the development of localcapacity for research supportThe Statistical Services Centre(SSC) at the University of Readingwill play a coordination role andwill foster the establishment ofthe network
  32. 32. 1 2 3 4 5 6 72016-2018 7500 4500 4500 3600 3600 3300 3000 300002019-2021 8250 4950 4950 3960 3960 3630 3300 330002022-2024 9075 5445 5445 4356 4356 3993 3630 36300Total 24825 14895 14895 11916 11916 10923 9930 99300Notional 9 years Budget for Dryland Systems (x $1,000) by IDOsYearIDOsTotalNotional 9 years Budget for Dryland Systems (x $1,000) by RegionsRegions TotalWA E &SA NAWA SA CA2016-2018 7200 7200 6000 6000 3600 300002019-2021 7920 7920 6600 6600 3960 330002022-2024 8712 8712 7260 7260 4356 36300Total 23832 23832 19860 19860 11916 99300YearNotional BudgetsBy Period, IDO, and Region
  33. 33. Risk-averse and Sustainably Intensified Farming Systems
  34. 34. The global research partnership to improve agricultural productivity and income in the worlds dry areasRecapitulation of ImpactPathwaysImpact goals, outcomes, outputs,and indicators
  35. 35. GOAL (IMPACT):PURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Customised options: number of options and number ofhh targetedOUTPUTS:1.Improved resilience options (components,interactions and their management; explicitconsideration of buffer functions, managing trade-offs between production and risk; nested scale riskmitigation, including incentives to adopt them)2.Tools, methods, processes and capacity of NARESto create and customise improved resilience optionsto local circumstances across scaling domainsResilience index: contextualised multiscale assessmentof resilience building strategies at household andcommunity levels.Use of outputs: number and size of organisations usingthem and their areal and population domains; proportionof sector in targeted areas this representsMore resilient livelihoods for vulnerablehouseholds in marginal areasNARES use tools, methods and processes to generateand customise improved resilience options fortargeted groups of vulnerable householdsNarrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators
  36. 36. GOAL (IMPACT):Stability: iv)variance in per capita annual income(nine year rolling); v)trend in iiiPURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Customised options: number of options andnumber of hh targetedOUTPUTS:1. Improved intensification options(components, interactions and theirmanagement; information on investmentcosts, returns and risk; risk mitigation2. Tools, methods, processes and capacity ofNARES1 to create and customise improvedintensification options to local circumstancesacross scaling domains3.Action research focused on scaling domainsrather than pilot sitesNarrative Summary Objectively Verifiable IndicatorsIncrease: i)absolute increase, ii)% increase, iii) %of hh above povertyMore stable and higher per capita income forintensifiable households.Use of outputs: number and size of organisationsusing them and their areal and populationNARES1 use tools, methods and processes togenerate and customise improvedintensification options for targeted groups of
  37. 37. GOAL (IMPACT):PURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Integration: network strengthamongst agricultural and healthworkers and organisationsAdoption: number and size oforganisations, their areal andpopulation domains; proportion ofInterventions: number ofinterventions and number of hhthey targetOUTPUTS:1.Diagnosis of constraints andopportunities of local foodsystems leading to identificationof constraints and opportunities toimprove year round access tofood2.Systematic research oninterventions to address identifiedconstraints and opportunities,leading to a matrix of testedinterventions and deliverystrategies associated with thecontexts in which they workNARES and health sectororganisations work together andadopt diagnostic and systematicresearch approaches to promotingand developing interventions toimprove vulnerable women andchildren’s access to, and controlof, more and more diverse foodDietary diversity: i)timeconcentration index of number offood groups and individual foodsconsumed by women and childrenin sample hh ii)proportion ofwomen and children aboveWomen and children invulnerable households have yearround access to greater quantityand diversity of food sourcesNarrative Summary Objectively Verifiable IndicatorsMeans ofVerification
  38. 38. GOAL (IMPACT):PURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Use of outputs: number and sizeof communities adoptingevidence based governancemodels developed by DSEffect: trends in NVDI over timefor areas under and outside newgovernance modelsOUTPUTS:1.Technologies, tools, methods,processes and approachesdeveloped and tested forevidence based ecosystemmanagement2.Focus on negotiation support(amongst stakeholders) andgoverance models3Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable IndicatorsMeans ofVerificationArea: i)ha and proportion oftarget area under governanceMore sustainable and equitablemanagement of land and waterresources in pastoral andMultiple stakeholders in pastoral/ agropastoral areas, useevidence based ecosystemmanagement, at communitylevel in the governance ofcommon and privately managedland and water resources
  39. 39. GOAL (IMPACT):Efficiency: trend inaverage transaction costfor key marketedproductsEquity: proportion ofproduct value accruing torural householdsPURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Farmers and pastoralists(especially women) have betteraccess to more diverse, efficientand equitable marketsOUTPUTS:1.Modes of operation to lowertransaction costs throughdevelopment of assembly pointsand market hubs2.More innovative partnershipmodels involving entrepreneurs,marketing commissions, tradersand warrantage (inventory creditsystems)3.Improved market information systemsBetter functioning marketsunderpin intensification of rurallivelihoodsAccess: Genderdisaggregated numbersof people andproportions of targetpopulation with access toNarrative SummaryObjectively VerifiableIndicatorsMeans ofVerification
  40. 40. GOAL (IMPACT):PURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Uptake: Number andproportion of serviceprovider using modelsand methodsdeveloped by DrylandSystemsOUTPUTS:1.Improved and innovativeextension methods bettertargeted to message and context2. Improved models forinteraction amongst service3. Innovative public-privatepartnership models for servicedelivery4ACTIVITIES: MilestonesReach: genderdisaggregatednumbers andproportions of peopleand rural householdsService providers adoptinnovations to improve theireffectiveness, integration andreachMore integrated, effective andconnected service deliveryinstitutions underpinning systemintensification and resilienceNarrative SummaryObjectively VerifiableIndicatorsMeans ofVerificationAssumptions andRisks
  41. 41. GOAL (IMPACT):PURPOSE (OUTCOMES):Implementation: assessment ofpolicy implementationOUTPUTS:1.Analysis of policy andinstitutional barriers to adoptionof sustainable intensificationoptions2.Quantified impact ofeffectiveness of policyalternatives3.Policy briefs providingevidence targeting key fora forpolicy changeNarrative Summary Objectively Verifiable IndicatorsMeans ofVerificationRemoval of constraints andincentives lead to ruralhouseholds engaging in moresustainable practices thatPolicy: documented change inpolicies and the number andPolicy makers reform andinstitutions implement policiesthat remove constraints to, andEffect: numbers and proportions(within target areas) of ruralhouseholds adopting moresustainable practices

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