Ultimate Guide to RetirementFrom	  the	  Editors	  of	   M oney	  M agazine	  (2011,	  J une	  10).	  	  U l?mate	  G uide...
There	  are	  three	  main	  kinds	  of	  investments,	  or	  "asset	  classes":	  stocks,	  bonds	  and	  cash.	  Y our	 ...
Once	  a	  year	  is	  plenty.	  T hats	  when	  you	  should	  make	  sure	  your	  asset	  alloca?on	  s?ll	  makes	  se...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ultimate Guide to Retirement

305 views

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Ultimate Guide to Retirement

  1. 1. Ultimate Guide to RetirementFrom  the  Editors  of   M oney  M agazine  (2011,  J une  10).    U l?mate  G uide  to  R e?rement.    M oney  M agazine.    R etrieved  from  h Cp:// money.cnn.com/re?rement/guide/Basics/When  do  I  need  to  start  inves/ng  for  re/rement?We  get  it:  Re?rement  is  just  about  the  last  thing  on  your  mind  when  youre  in  your  20s.  However,  star?ng  to  invest  for  re?rement  as  soon  as  you  finish  school  and  begin  earning  income  is  a  brilliant  financial  move.  T he  reason  is  a  magical  liCle  thing  called  compounding.  I ts  what  happens  when  your  interest  keeps  earning  interest,  year  aSer  year.If  you  start  early,  the  effects  of  compounding  can  be  huge.  F or  example,  suppose  you  start  seVng  aside  $1,000  a  year  (about  $19  a  week)  when  youre  25.  Y ou  put  it  in  a  re?rement  account  earning  8%  a  year.  E ven  if  you  stop  inves?ng  completely  when  you  turn  35  -­‐  that  is,  youve  invested  for  only  10  years  -­‐  your  total  investment  will  have  grown  to  nearly  $169,000  by  the  ?me  you  turn  65  and  are  ready  to  re?re.  T hats  right:  A  $10,000  investment  turns  into  $169,000.OK,  heres  where  it  gets  really  interes?ng.  Lets  say  you  do  the  same  exact  thing,  but  you  dont  start  inves?ng  the  $1,000  a  year  un?l  you  turn  35.  A nd  you  keep  on  inves?ng  that  much  every  single  year  un?l  you  turn  65.  T hat  is,  you  invest  $1,000  a  year  for  30  years,  rather  than  for  10  years  as  in  the  previous  example.  How  much  do  you  wind  up  with  when  youre  65?  O nly  about  $125,000.  T hats  right:  E ven  though  you  invest  three  1mes  as  much  money,  you  wind  up  with  less.The  earlier  you  start  inves?ng,  the  more  you  can  benefit  from  compounding.  T hats  why  you  need  to  get  going  as  soon  as  possible.How  much  money  do  I  need  to  invest  for  re/rement?That  depends  on  a  whole  bunch  of  things,  like  when  you  start  inves?ng,  what  you  decide  to  invest  in,  and  when  you  decide  to  re?re.But  as  a  general  rule,  financial  planners  advise  that  every  year  you  should  invest  the  maximum  possible  in  any  tax-­‐advantaged  re?rement  plan  that  youre  eligible  for.  A nd  if  youre  geVng  started  with  re?rement  inves?ng  on  the  late  side,  you  may  need  to  invest  addi?onal  money,  over  and  beyond  the  money  in  such  plans,  into  regular  (taxable)  investment  accounts.For  a  beCer  sense  of  how  much  youll  need  to  invest,  go  to  our  re?rement  planner  calculator.Where  should  I  put  my  re/rement  money?When  you  invest  for  re?rement,  you  typically  have  three  main  op?ons:1. You  can  put  the  money  into  a  re?rement  account  thats  offered  by  your  employer,  such  as  a  401(k)  or  403(b)  plan.   These  plans  are  great  deals  because  the  money  will  grow  tax-­‐free  un?l  you  withdraw  it  in  re?rement.  Whats  more,  you   escape  taxes  either  on  the  money  you  put  into  the  plan  or  the  money  you  withdraw  from  the  plan,  depending  on  whether   you  choose  a  tradi?onal  or  Roth  op?on.  2. You  can  put  the  money  into  a  tax-­‐advantaged  re?rement  account  of  your  own,  such  as  an  I RA.   I RAs  offer  similar  tax   breaks  to  401(k)s,  though  some  of  the  eligibility  rules  differ.  3. You  can  put  the  money  into  a  regular  investment  account  that  doesnt  have  tax  advantages.The  first  two  op?ons  are  far  beCer  deals,  but  there  are  limits  on  how  much  money  you  can  put  into  them  each  year.  I f  youve  put  all  the  money  youre  allowed  into  tax-­‐favored  plans  and  you  want  to  save  even  more  for  re?rement  (for  example,  because  you  got  a  late  start  in  saving  and  need  to  make  up  for  lost  ?me),  youll  have  to  use  a  regular  investment  account.What  should  I  invest  in?Good  ques?on.  A nd  though  zillions  of  books  have  been  wriCen  about  this,  the  basics  are  hardly  rocket  science.
  2. 2. There  are  three  main  kinds  of  investments,  or  "asset  classes":  stocks,  bonds  and  cash.  Y our  re?rement  accounts  should  probably  contain  a  mix  of  stocks  and  bonds  -­‐  and  maybe  cash  too.You  can  invest  in  stocks  and  bonds  in  one  of  two  ways:  by  buying  them  individually  or  by  buying  them  via  a  mutual  fund.   A  mutual  fund  is  simply  a  collec?on  of  stocks,  or  bonds,  or  cash  equivalents  -­‐  or  some?mes  a  mix  of  all  three.Some  people  also  invest  in  "hard  assets"  like  real  estate  or  gold,  but  those  arent  always  great  choices  for  the  average  persons  re?rement  account.Stocks?  Bonds?  Whats  the  right  mix?We  know:  Y ou  want  to  pick  a  home-­‐run  stock,  cash  out  at  the  top  and  -­‐  bam!  -­‐  enjoy  an  instant  re?rement.Unfortunately,  it  rarely  works  out  that  way.  T he  good  news,  however,  is  that  smart  re?rement  inves?ng  is  actually  much,  much  easier.The  key  is  having  the  right  mix  of  stocks,  bonds  and  cash.  T he  mix  of  those  three  asset  classes  is  known  as  your  "asset  alloca?on."  Pick  your  asset  alloca?on  wisely,  and  it  will  do  the  work  for  you.Should  my  asset  alloca/on  change  as  I  get  older?Absolutely.  T hats  because  different  investment  mixes  are  riskier  than  others,  and  your  tolerance  for  risk  decreases  as  you  age.Stocks  -­‐  which  are  shares  of  ownership  in  a  corpora?on  -­‐  provide  the  most  juice  for  long-­‐term  growth.  But  theyre  vola?le,  so  they  can  lose  you  a  lot  of  money  in  the  short  term.  When  youre  young,  the  long-­‐term  growth  poten?al  of  stocks  outweighs  the  risks.  When  youre  older,  not  so  much.  S o  you  should  scale  back  on  the  percentage  of  stocks  in  your  porkolio  over  ?me.Bonds  -­‐  which  are  basically  interest-­‐bearing  loans  that  you  provide  a  company  or  government  -­‐  give  you  weaker  long-­‐term  returns  than  stocks  do,  but  less  vola?lity.  S o  you  should  increase  the  percentage  of  your  holdings  in  bonds  over  ?me.Cash  -­‐  or  "cash  equivalents,"  such  as  money-­‐market  funds  -­‐  are  the  least  risky  of  all.  But  they  also  have  the  lowest  returns.  Y ou  might  not  need  cash  in  your  re?rement  account  at  all  un?l  youre  approaching  re?rement  age  or  in  re?rement.Whats  the  best  asset  alloca/on  for  my  age?The  old  rule  of  thumb  used  to  be  that  you  should  subtract  your  age  from  100  -­‐  and  thats  the  percentage  of  your  porkolio  that  you  should  keep  in  stocks.  F or  example,  if  youre  30,  you  should  keep  70%  of  your  porkolio  in  stocks.  I f  youre  70,  you  should  keep  30%  of  your  porkolio  in  stocks.However,  with  A mericans  living  longer  and  longer,  many  financial  planners  are  now  recommending  that  the  rule  should  be  closer  to  110  or  120  minus  your  age.  T hats  because  if  you  need  to  make  your  money  last  longer,  youll  need  the  extra  growth  that  stocks  can  provide.To  find  the  right  asset  alloca?on  for  you,  go  to  our  asset  alloca?on  calculator.How  much  should  I  save  if  I  want  to  re/re  early?To  step  off  the  corporate  treadmill  in  your  50s  or  early  60s  and  maintain  anything  close  to  your  standard  of  living,  you  need  a  seriously  big  re?rement  kiCy.How  serious?  Y oull  likely  need  assets  worth  10  to  16  ?mes  your  salary  by  the  ?me  you  leave  your  job.  A  45-­‐year-­‐old  making  $120,000  who  hopes  to  re?re  at  age  60,  say,  should  already  have  nearly  $700,000  set  aside.  (See  the  Re?re  E arly  calculator.)You  can  get  by  with  less  if  youll  have  other  sources  of  income.  I f  that  same  45-­‐year-­‐old  has  a  typical  old-­‐fashioned  check-­‐a-­‐month  pension,  for  example,  he  might  need  only  $432,000  in  savings  to  be  on  track.  I f  you  expect  to  hold  down  a  scaled-­‐back  job  for  your  first  decade  of  re?rement,  you  can  also  get  by  with  less.S?ll,  your  target  is  a  big  number,  and  to  reach  it  youll  have  to  save  diligently,  invest  aggressively,  and  keep  taxes  and  expenses  from  eroding  your  returns.How  oAen  should  I  check  on  my  re/rement  investments?
  3. 3. Once  a  year  is  plenty.  T hats  when  you  should  make  sure  your  asset  alloca?on  s?ll  makes  sense  for  your  age,  and  perhaps  sell  certain  investments  that  have  grown  so  big  that  your  target  alloca?on  is  out  of  whack.  Reinvest  the  money  in  order  to  bring  your  asset  alloca?on  back  where  you  want  it.One  nice  benefit  of  rebalancing  like  this  is  that  it  forces  you  to  do  what  so  many  investors  fail  to  do:  Buy  low  and  sell  high.  

×