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Supporting post-school transitions through non-linear learning journeys to positive destinations and successful outcomes

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CELCIS Education Conference 2019: Glasgow Kelvin College shares its approach to supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged learners, with a focus on the Transitions to Learning and Work programme, which provides alternative pathways for young people who have been unable to sustain attendance at school.

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Supporting post-school transitions through non-linear learning journeys to positive destinations and successful outcomes

  1. 1. Supporting post-school transitions through non-linear learning journeys to positive destinations and successful outcomes CELCIS Education Conference 16th May 2019
  2. 2. Maggie Murphy Senior Curriculum Manager Faculty of Health, Care & Learner Development mmurphy@glasgowkelvin.ac.uk 07824 866 176
  3. 3. Session Outcomes GKC DEMOGRAPHIC AND PROGRAMMES STUDENT VOICE TRACKING INDIVIDUAL LEARNER JOURNEYS PARTNERSHIP WORKING AND FLEXIBLE DELIVERY MODELS OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN ‘LOOKED AFTER AT HOME’ GKC’S LEARNING JOURNEY LEARNING POINTS & REPLICABLE ACTIONS Q&A
  4. 4. College Ethos: Transforming lives through education. Mission Statement: Glasgow Kelvin College will enhance our learners’ aspirations, careers and lives through accessible, inclusive, high quality lifelong learning. (Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  5. 5. College catchment area: constituencies: 4,6 & 7 64% of the college’s enrolments (2016/17) come from students in the most deprived 20% of the population, as against a regional average of 41%
  6. 6. Partner Schools: Springburn St Andrews St Mungos St Rochs Whitehill All Saints Bannerman Eastbank Lochend Smithycroft • College is the most common positive destination for senior phase leavers in the College catchment area • The College has developed closer ties with local secondary schools. Programmes specifically aimed at S2-4 pupils to support raising attainment strategies impacts on the age range of its student body (16% compared to GCC 2% and CoG 2%). • NOMIS data for North East Glasgow posits that 27% of the population in this area has no qualifications, against a figure of 9.9% for Scotland.
  7. 7. College Context Statement: 2018-2020 24.6% of the North East Glasgow population are income deprived, a figure which is 86% greater than that for Scotland. In 2016 in Glasgow North East, 36.8% of children were living in poverty, against a Glasgow figure of 34% which in itself is higher than any other Scottish city. In 2014, 46.9% of children in North East Glasgow were classed by Social Work criteria as ‘vulnerable’, against a total Glasgow rate of 18.8% and this has implications when allocating resources within the city region. Of the then North East Social Work area’s Children & Families Service Users, 31.8% are classified as ‘looked after’, ahead of the city average of 28.8%.
  8. 8. The Student Voice Welcome Leah & Caitlyn
  9. 9. Fiona Templeton Community Learning & Development Manager Faculty of Health, Care & Learner Development ftempleton@glasgowkelvin.ac.uk 07775 586 225
  10. 10. Transitions to Learning & Work programme: Developed by legacy John Wheatley College- commencing in August 2008- 2011, offered as pilot programme. 2012, programme secured Big Lottery Funding for three years delivery, including staffing costs for managers, lecturers and youth workers Largest delivery partner for EVIP virtual school (Enhanced Vocational Inclusion Programme) 2013, College regional merger. Vocational subjects offer expanded to include wider variety from across merged college curriculum
  11. 11. Programme Development 2015, programme secured continued funding from Big Lottery and also from the Robertson Trust for three years delivery, with a strong focus on working towards mainstreaming Commitment to increased recruitment and delivery Combined targets and reporting, accountable to external steering group End of reporting period, current challenges and opportunities
  12. 12. Criteria for referral Specifically designed to support young people from the following criteria to successfully re-engage in Educational opportunities: • Young people aged between 15-18 years • Young people who are care experienced (in the broadest terms); • Young people who are excluded, or at risk of exclusion, from education; and • Young people at risk of early entry into the criminal justice system. Commonly the programme enrols young people who have never before been able to sustain an educational experience and for whom there are few other realistic options to sustain attendance at and progress from an educational experience.
  13. 13. Referrals and enrolment Most referrals come through Social Work Area teams and Guidance or Pastoral Care Secondary school teachers (Joint Support Team pathway) . Referrals are accepted throughout academic the year and new learners will be integrated where and how it best fits learner(s) need. Following referral, learners are initially invited for an informal interview, along with a supporting adult, in which their views about their own goals and ambitions are recorded.
  14. 14. Programme design • Relational CLD approach. Development of positive trusted relationships with peers, youth workers and other adults in authority; • Small group class sizes throughout academic year. • Group work activities are strong focus for many classes with accredited outcomes. • Adhering to the Code of Learner Behaviour; • Ongoing guidance, setting personal and educational learning targets using College based Individual Learning Plans • Introduction to subject lecturers, SQA qualifications (SCQF levels 3, 4 & 5) and support for progression.
  15. 15. Curriculum offer • Introductory college certificates via VLE (benchmarked at SCQF3) • GKC Community Achievement Awards (SCQF4-7) • Youth Achievement Awards (SCQF4-7) • Trinity College Arts Awards (EQF1-4) • SQA units from: • Hairdressing & Beauty • Construction Crafts • Automotive Engineering • Early Years Education & Childcare • Employability Award • Working with Others • Numeracy • Literacy
  16. 16. 42% of leaners are care experienced Learners from North East Glasgow most likely to sustain the programme 54% North East 26% North West 5% South 2% other Local Authority
  17. 17. On referral to the Transitions to Learning & Work programme: 10% have left school 11% Winter 2018 leavers 45% Summer 2019 leavers 32% Winter 2019 leavers 2% are 2020 school leavers
  18. 18. Progression trends based on age at enrolment: 21% • May progress to 16+ destination part-way through session 45% • Likely to remain for a year before progressing to 16+ destinations 34% • Likely to return to Transitions for part or full second year
  19. 19. Challenges and recurring themes SUSTAINED ATTENDANCE AND INCREASED AND IMPROVED LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT MANAGING LOW LEVEL DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR WITHIN CLASSROOM AND WIDER COLLEGE ENVIRONMENT. RAISING AWARENESS OF PROGRAMME WHILST CHALLENGING MYTHS AND STEREOTYPES SECURING MEANINGFUL AND SUSTAINABLE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
  20. 20. Objectives of home supervision to provide effective measures for the care, protection, support, guidance, treatment or control of children living at home with their families; to enable children and their families to recognise and tackle successfully the difficulties and problems which led to the child being referred to a children's hearing; to reduce offending behaviour where this is an issue; to provide protection for children from others or from themselves, where this is an issue; to help ensure school attendance where this is an issue; to provide programmes of supervision which will maintain the confidence of Children's Hearing members and the public in the effectiveness of home supervision as an option; to provide programmes of supervision which aim to integrate the child in the community and maintain the confidence of the community.
  21. 21. Challenges with home supervision Continued exposure to problematic environment; ‘good enough’ care? Children, young people and families resist intervention Stigma of labels, ‘on supervision’ ‘looked after’ Not a priority for resources; mismatch between need and provision Lack of research focused on home supervision All family needs should be addressed The ‘Overseen but Often Overlooked’ Study. Vicki Welch (2016)
  22. 22. Learning Points • Whole college approach: • Support from Board of Management and Senior Management Team; • Youth work and teaching staff partnership; • Mandatory Safeguarding and Corporate Parenting CPD module for all staff; • Support positive interaction with reception/café/cleaning staff. • Wide and effective networks: • Secondary schools and Skill Development Scotland; • Social Work Services; • Youth networks – linking young person with local agencies. • Open and honest communication among care team: • Full information on referral with Wellbeing Plan; • Representation at Social Work meetings and Children’s Panel hearings; • Family engagement. • Positive choice to follow alternative pathway, not a ‘last resort’
  23. 23. Thank you for listening Questions or comments?

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