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  • A Summary of
    PE – Data
    RR – Community
    SK – Tech, Education, FB Course PM

    DF - Operations
    RS – Coaching & Education

    AP – Logistics
    AT – Communications & PR
    IL – CEO
    JP – Platform Developer
    LK - Fundraising
  • A Summary of
    PE – Data
    RR – Community
    SK – Tech, Education, FB Course PM

    DF - Operations
    RS – Coaching & Education

    AP – Logistics
    AT – Communications & PR
    IL – CEO
    JP – Platform Developer
    LK - Fundraising

  • the central questions for each step,
    how the educators role fits into getting answers for those questions,
    what artefacts, results, milestones educators should expect to see emerging

    Delivering over the next two days will be RR, DF, PE , and myself who taught one of our first school courses.

    You have quite detailed notes already. So much of what I will share is the why behind the what of AfG principles

    Debbie will also chime in toward the end of our look at each step and offer you tips for making AFG work in your school context.

    Between the 4 of us we hope to cover a lot of ground, we can field short questions as we go along, but they’ll also be Q&A time towards the end of the session to explore issues


  • Mohima Video –

    Note the passion for the problem and the solution Opportunities for networking; Support; career springboard
    Clarity of problem description; Elegance of Solution – all products of following the class
  • AFG, WHAT IT IS

    an award-winning problem-solving course
    is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK License (Please share and share alike)
    Work flow: Rapidly Incremental & Iterative: Fail fast, fail often.
    Guided by questioning from educator and student peers
    a cross-curricular and multi-disciplinary programme; designed to develop students across a wide spectrum of skills, including problem solving, research and analysis, innovation and value creation, and to some degree technical skills
    student-led; an opportunity for young people to create imaginative mobile apps that solve problems they care about; aims for a personal
    a personalised learning experience that students own
    Real world problems, owned by active learners



  • NOT

    Not impersonal, batch process approach. Where problem domains are prescribed
    WITI? Prescriptions would kill the course; remove the onus from students to explore

    an individual undertaking--it has a crucial teamwork and networking aspect
    WITI? ICT not famed for teamworking, for many its the first time to see the sum of the parts being greater than the whole on a student own tech project

    an app implementation or programming course, but is focused on problem solving and developing entrepreneurial skills.
    WITI? Common misconception that some find it hard to let go of, even after being trained. If you try to stretch beyond the boundaries of what this design programme is intended to do, you may come unstuck


    based on traditional standardised assessment and a simple right or wrong answer; the focus is on failing fast and often and emerging with a validated solution. We will provide a spectrum of varying degrees of quality though
    WITI? Two common myths that pervade one is that there is one way of doing things - a very definite approach to innovation. The other is that real world users are an afterthought, irrelevancy or impracticality. AfG challenges all of that.

    a traditional “waterfall” or linear model of software development; it uses agile models and is more like an iterative quest for the right problems, the right data, and of course, apt solutions
    WITI? As you’ll see the steps convey a general iterative and incremental movement through the course, and not a rigid sequence of things to do
    more like an iterative quest for the right problems, the right data, and of course, apt solutions


  • The map is not the territory; how you conceive of the programme in theory, will always vary from how it works in practice.

    Pacing: Different teams of differing competence moving at different pacing at the same time

    Resilience: Teams of students who don’t know what they don’t know. More resilient students find it easier to flourish, less resilient struggle with the fail fast fail often mantra

    Avoiding Suggestions: We’re use to dispensing advice and it can he hard initially to break the habit and turn our sagely advice into questions, can’t it?

    Aside from logistical challenges, most of the challenges are to do with perception. Chief among these is over complication, especially of a technical kind that imagines the course to be more technically demanding than it actually is. Most of the best design is simple, elegant and unobtrusive.
  • Problem Definition: Moving from big, vague out-of-scope ideas to precise problems that can be solved
    What is the problem?
    WITI?: Apps are about helping users solve problems. So beginning there is a good idea. Helping young people to understand that problems are the lifeblood of innovation. And the only reason we bother finding solutions. That is to say, we are not making software for it’s own sake but because it adds value, and makes the work meaningful

    Research: Validating hypotheses with customers and users
    Is the problem a real one?
    WITI? Everything conceived during step 1 is an assumption. Those assumptions need to be tested, research provides that opportunity to verify the story students have with the users reality

    Solution design: Exploring and describing and selecting from possible value-creating solutions
    What are the possible solutions?
    WITI? It’s the part students jump to, and it’s at the heart of the course. This is a conceptual course, and this step is where the solutions concepts are fleshed out

    Product design: Describing how users will navigate in, and experience value, through the solution
    What will the user experience be?
    WITI? AfG is a highly visual course, this is where the visual assets are created (sitemaps, wireframes, information architecture)

    First build pathway (in parallel with above steps):
    Moving toward a technical implementation (using App Inventor) that solves some aspect of, or the crux of the defined problem in the form of a prototype
    What aspects of the solution, if any, can we build with App Inventor WITI? Finally we have the 5th phase, which happens in parallel with the other 4 steps. We’ve built App Inventor activity into the other 4 steps. The diagram also shows step 5 circumscribing the other 4 steps to covey their parallel nature.
  • Incremental and iterative – students build up there projects incrementally through this process

    But the general flow of idea is iterative in practise, meaning students rapidly cycle through initial versions of problems and ideas, testing them on users and getting expert feedback for the next iteration.

    So lets say a team comes up with a bunch of ideas during step 1, from which they choose 1 idea to explore. They may attempt to cycle through the validation of that idea, but find that the idea fails or is somehow flawed. They may then revisit the idea, perhaps redefining the problem they are trying to solve, or the solution they are proposing.

    We call this deviation from the existing plan a ‘pivot’.

    All this means there should be less anxiety about an idea ‘failing’. There is a sense in which the more fast failures the better/


  • Each AfG session plan is based on a 50-minute session
    Each session is a unit of progress; oversight of all sessions is possible via the online platform
  • We’ve talked about the lifecycle of the course, lets zoom in and take a closer look at the flow of a session

    Educator Talks
    These talks provide the core base of knowledge students need as stimuli for their ideas. Educator talk templates will be available on the confluence site WITI? Students probably won’t read up on this stuff; so it needs to be communicated in a punchy, economic way
     
    Student Tasks
    Practical, constructivist activities that help develop and improve a student's understanding of ideas they are working through. Some activities will lead to required outcomes (assignments) others will provide intermediate steps of progress.
    WITI? “Get on with you work” doesn’t produce the right results. Early on it’s especially important to help students manage the critical path by working through activities systematically
     
    Graphic Organisers
    Students tend to record their work with various lo-fi visual artefacts (e.g. mind maps and wireframes) which can be uploaded to the online platform. ~The graphic organisers make sure the artefacts that emerge are clear and can be easily interpreted by experts & third parties
    WITI? Course is not prosaic. Mobile is primarily a visual medium
     
    Expert Visits
    Talks enable and support the tasks, drawing on the information they gather from the students’ graphic organisers . Together they set up a critical path for productive work.
    WITI? Student Motivation; Breakthrough Insight, Knowledge gaps filled, role model to emulate
  • We use the terms schedule and scheme of work interchangeably
    The sequence of session plans over the course duration
  • We’ll talk continually about the role of the educator, but one of key feature of our pedagogy, is the aim of moving move beyond compliant and co-operative student reactions to responses of ownership; for us we’ve found that means
    Ask a lot of probing questions and LISTEN
    Getting clarity on what students are finding difficult


    For the first few session you will be having a more hands on role in keeping students on task; however as the course progresses you should start to see the teams become more cohesive and independent allowing you to take on a more non-directive, adult-to-adult style.

    What teams say and do will start to become more instructive to one another as the course progresses; allowing you to step back.

    Outline aims
    Signpost the online platform as repository of artefacts
    Stimulate the session with an Educator Talk
    Explain and illustrate required assignment or intermediate task
    Circulate--Avoid just giving instructions/giving answers to students; instead take on a question-asking and sound boarding role in trying to assist/encourage teams as you go around the class
    Avoid prescribing solutions or quick fixes; don’t allow students to complete tasks perfunctorily
    Identify any common problems / patterns of difficulty - address in plenary
    Focus on future possibilities instead of past mistakes
    Field student questions - if you don’t know the answer - say so. Encourage students to join you in finding the answer then seek guidance from AfG Education Team after the session or with an expert if you have one booked
  • Problem Selection ( ~ week 6)
    Advice on Implementing and Pivoting Solutions ( ~ week 14)

    To make the most of experts in a session
    Ensure students are really ready to share and interact with an expert

    RR will run through the practicalities of how you actually get experts on board for your course

    Give students the date of the visit well in advance
    Ensure all students understand the protocol for interacting with experts
    Keep interactions on track by moderating/chairing discussions to ensure equal access to expertise
  • Lets start with
    What apps are
    The main technology they make use of
  • For sports fans out there, It may help you to think about event handling in terms of a baseball play. The hitter hits the ball (which is our user event)…
  • And sure enough, the event handler has a recipe for responding: First he’s got to catch the ball, then decide which recipe to do next…

    So in summary,

    Apps help users to get jobs done
    An app is a set of event handlers which handle many events
    Event handlers have ‘recipes‘ they only perform in response to particular events
  • Mobile Platforms
    [“a mobile plaforms primary duty is provide access to the devices”. Which devices need to run software and services across a platform, or core programming language]
    Licensed: sold to device manufacturers for non exclusive distro on devices Java Micro edition (J2ME), Binary Run time Environment for Wireless (BREW), Windows Mobile, LiMo Proprietary: Platforms developed for manufacturers by manufacturers, exclusively Palm, Blackberry, iPhone Open Source: Freely available for users to download, alter and edit Android
  • Ontology: The class of relevant problems

    So we’ve talked about what apps are and their superpowers, but about the vulnerabilities and inconveniences in our everyday routines that mobile apps address. Just what kind of problem should we be on the lookout for.?
  • It’s very important throughout the course that students can state what the problem is quickly and concisely.

    Ambiguity or waffling is a sure sign that story is either not well understood, or is merely a symptom of deeper, underlying and specific issue
  • The good problems, the best ones, are BAD for the prospective user of your solution. They are

    Familiar: They effect either real people you know (and can name), or yourself

    Frequent: They happen often enough to justify a solution

    Specific: They have a clearly defined story you can tell

    Irritant: They often get on somebody’s nerves

    Expensive: What you forfeit if you don’t have a solution is pretty high

    Moves: You physical position is not static when you encounter this issue
  • How familiar is this issue? how many of people in the team agree?
    How often do you encounter the problem?
    Is this problem encountered during a set of specific tasks?
    Are people irriated by it? How much?
    Is the opportunity cost expensive? How big is the gap between the current situation and the best available solution?
    Do people encounter this problem on the move?
  • Describe 5 Problems
    Keep in mind

    the criteria for good problems that we’ve just outlined
    need of those affected by the problem
    Routines and ways of doing things you go through in work, rest or play

    Unwritten rule: Keep it simple! & Tell a story
  • Describe 5 Problems
    Keep in mind

    the criteria for good problems that we’ve just outlined
    need of those affected by the problem
    Routines and ways of doing things you go through in work, rest or play

    Unwritten rule: Keep it simple! & Tell a story
  • Include the key parts of the 5w’s
  • The techniques

    Image JD Hancock
  • Once you’ve considered the vex factor, another time honoured way of capturing the story behind the problem is the 5 w’s: News Story Pyramid
  • Who: Lets say it’s students (16-25)
    What: The circumstances are that the student is studying for exams
    Where: Student dorm
    When: 7am
    Why: Late night cramming, leaves the student jaded!

    Alll of which precipitate in the student ignoring snooze, running late and potentially missing the exam!
  • Describe 5 Problems
    Keep in mind

    the criteria for good problems that we’ve just outlined
    need of those affected by the problem
    Routines and ways of doing things you go through in work, rest or play

    Unwritten rule: Keep it simple! & Tell a story
  • Compare the merits of each problem; are they familiar, frequent, specific, irritant, expensive, unpredictable, simple?
  • Remember to really empathise with those affected; Break down the stories you’ve been telling into discrete steps.
    Consider the mental model of those effected
  • Include the key parts of the 5w’s
  • Include the key parts of the 5w’s
  • Key Learning Outcomes for Problem Definition
    Student Identifying multiple, divergent interests / problem
    Students exploring business problems
    Negotiation and cooperation with team members
    Assignments required for Problem Definition
    Prioritised list of 5 'Big' Ideas
    Selected Idea (with clear problem) presented as
    '5 ws'; (Who, What, Why, When, Where attributes of problem)
    SCQA Mapping (Situation, Complication, Question attributes of problem)

    Adapting Problem Definition for your students
     
    Deductive or Inductive Approach
    We recommend moving from the general to the specific by starting with where students are, (which is typically very excited about large, impractical app ideas that are unlikely to work) and breaking these down to zero-in on plausible scenarios
    Alternatively you can insist students focus on coming up with problems first. However, be advised this is challenging for even gifted students.

  • Problem Definition: Moving from big, vague out-of-scope ideas to precise problems that can be solved
    What is the problem?
    WITI?: Apps are about helping users solve problems. So beginning there is a good idea. Helping young people to understand that problems are the lifeblood of innovation. And the only reason we bother finding solutions. That is to say, we are not making software for it’s own sake but because it adds value, and makes the work meaningful

    Research: Validating hypotheses with customers and users
    Is the problem a real one?
    WITI? Everything conceived during step 1 is an assumption. Those assumptions need to be tested, research provides that opportunity to verify the story students have with the users reality

    Solution design: Exploring and describing and selecting from possible value-creating solutions
    What are the possible solutions?
    WITI? It’s the part students jump to, and it’s at the heart of the course. This is a conceptual course, and this step is where the solutions concepts are fleshed out

    Product design: Describing how users will navigate in, and experience value, through the solution
    What will the user experience be?
    WITI? AfG is a highly visual course, this is where the visual assets are created (sitemaps, wireframes, information architecture)

    First build pathway (in parallel with above steps):
    Moving toward a technical implementation (using App Inventor) that solves some aspect of, or the crux of the defined problem in the form of a prototype
    What aspects of the solution, if any, can we build with App Inventor WITI? Finally we have the 5th phase, which happens in parallel with the other 4 steps. We’ve built App Inventor activity into the other 4 steps. The diagram also shows step 5 circumscribing the other 4 steps to covey their parallel nature.
  • Users are often selfish... Like Garfield
  • It’s a search not just data but genuine insight. It should culminate in story board of the problem and a video
  • Include the key parts of the 5w’s
  • Operators
    Alerts Keywords
  • Here is the link in case the video is not working.
    https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=1024bf4073c21bb5&resid=1024BF4073C21BB5!312&parid=root
  • Assignments Required for AfG Research
     
    Research Findings
    Results gathered from surveys; represented graphically AND what conclusions might reasonably follow from the findings
     
    Completed Problem Video
    An illustration of the problem; by role play or other means

    Key learning outcomes AfG Research
    Students are able to answer a range of questions about existing solutions (if they exist)
    Students obtain validation of the idea they’ve selected OR manage to pivot to an idea that better meets users needs
    Students attempt some information design to display their research findings in a compelling way

    Adapting AfG Research for your students
     
    If you find students are distracted with going through the motions with data collection and creating pie charts, then limit the time they can spend on these in the class. Perhaps you might challenge them to summarize the findings without aid from these traditional means.
     
    Roleplay is not a requirement for the problem video. If Students can describe/illustrate the problem some other, more effective way then so much the better.

     
  • R


  • Direct Fee The person or business pays for receiving a direct service/product, without other parties involved
    Charity The donor pays money so that the recipient gets a service or product
    Advertising Advertisers pay publishers to show viewers their ads
    Transactions The marketplace owner takes a cut from a transaction between buyer and seller
  • The solution is not the just set of event handlers that make up the app, is envisioning how this business model canvas will look. This canvas of 9 building blocks allows you to describe, analyze and create business models

    RHS

    1.Every business model has a customer, first you find your customer; What problems are we gonna solve?
    2. Next how are you gonna reach them: online? Mobile? Mass marketing?
    3. What kind of relationship, mass customisation? Personalised relationships?
    Revenue models, what are people willing to pay for?

    LHS: What are the key resources we need?

    5. What are the key resources we need? Developers? A great brand? Servers? Great people?
    6. What are the activities we need to perform? What is it that we really do? Marketing, maintaining servers?
    7. Who are the key partners/collaborators?
    8. Now you know what the cost structure is

  • End of Day 1
  • End of Day 1
  • Tends to not be done well – will be the subject of further webinars
  • 118 Skinburness Road Silloth Wigton Cumbria CA7 4QH
     
    Dove Consumer Care UK Unilever UK Freepost Admail 1000 London SW1A 2XX
    24/04/2012
    Dear Sir/Madam
    We are writing to you to concerning your recent advertisements surrounding self esteem. We are a currently involved in a group called Apps for Good which is a competition to make an app for an android phone. After researching different ideas we settled on an app for self esteem and this would help boost children’s confidence in secondary school. Now that you are also looking towards preventing this problem, we were wondering if you would be interested in supporting us in our app building project. Your advice would help us greatly with what we might put into our app and original ways that we can overcome this problem. Your support would be very much appreciated and we would be grateful if you could get back to us on this inquiry.
    Yours faithfully,
    Alison Storey, Sophie Thompson, Gemma Redmond and Katrina Weightman
    Year 11 pupils at The Nelson Thomlinson School, Cumbria.
     
  • Assignments Required for AfG Solution Design
     
    User Personas
    Photo / Scan of Completed Scenario Map
    Photo / Scan of Business Model Canvas
    Blurb for App stores

    Key Learning Outcomes AfG Solution Design
     
    Identifying multiple, divergent solutions to the user’s problem, and select one to focus on
    User focused - design, testing and refining of possible solutions to maximise value add
    Describe how a proposed solution creates, captures and delivers value
    Create a high-level design architecture: Organise a user’s journey according to their needs, and as required by the brand experience
    Design a feature set with economy; eliminate features that do not support user needs

    Adapting AfG Solution Design for your students
     
    This step culminates in the creation of an initial pitch presentation. The prescribed activities help to arrive at this presentation, as such there is less room for deviating from the course map. However, it is worth noting that students will frequently need to return to elements of step 1 and 2 as they pivot through various alternatives.


  • Followed by confluence demo
  • Followed by platform demo
  • We experimented with google groups last year and for a number of reasons it didn’t work as an online community. We think we have found the best solution in Stack Exchange
  • Demo Stack Overflow as an example
  • We need to audition, we will drive this forward but will need your participation

    Firstly, as a community, we need to define the range of topics and questions the AfG site will cover.

    To do this we need a minimum of 60 people to ‘follow’ our proposal

    A minimum of 40 questions that have been submitted and voted up by members of the AfG community

    Once we have that we need everybody to digitally ‘commit’ to actively particpating in the community

    The site will then go live on a probationary period but will be taken down if it isn’t used frequently (no activity within one month)

  • Agenda
  • OVERVIEW
    We’ll look at some of the artefacts, processes and challenges of this step that get produced along this stage

    Central Question: Precisely how should the interaction be laid out (app)? What should the user experience be?
  • : Precisely how should the interaction be laid out (app)? What should the user experience be?
  • Purpose of sitemap
  • Uxforthemasess, Neil Turner
    Prototypes are a much better at communicating a design. It’s much easier to sit down with designers, developers, product owners and of course users to get feedback and to run through design ideas if everyone can see how things might work with their own eyes.
    Prototypes are more user friendly. Where as people are often scared off by wireframes everyone understands what a prototype is (just make it clear that prototypes are very different from the finished article).
    Prototypes require less documentation as they are less open to interpretation and on-page interactions can be mocked up. If you do need to document your prototypes (hopefully with an emphasis on ‘just enough’ documentation) then you’ll find yourself having to write many fewer comments for a prototype than a set of wireframes.
    Prototypes better support user-centred design. It’s much easier to carry out usability testing with a prototype than a set of wireframes and to get lots of juicy feedback from users in general.
    Prototypes require less work. If you are careful to prototype ‘just enough’ to get the feedback that you need then prototypes typically require less work than wireframes because you’ll need to write (and maintain) less documentation. –
  • Koubachi is another app on the app market which has similar features.
    They alert you when you next need to water or feed your plants.
    Unlike our app they do not integrate other phone features into their app like Weather Birds does and does not tell you how much to water your plant each day according to the weather.
    www.koubachi.com


  • Mock ups
    Front page when app is launched
    Selection process
  • Use of camera to take picture of plant
    Use of recognition software like those of fingerprint recognition.
    Notifications/alerts on how much to water each day.

  • End of Day 1
  • Assignments required for AfG Product Design
    Sitemaps
    Wireframes / Balsamiq Mockups

    How to Facilitate AfG Product Design
    Allow students to quickly ‘sketch’ prototypes by hand or with Balsamiq
    Encourage systematic feedback with real users
    Ensure the feedback loop is closed (i.e. students action the user feedback) with an amended iteration

    Adapting AfG Product Design for your students
     
    Technically artistic students may be keen to go straight to Product Design and skip Solution Design. Provided students are using wireframes in step 3 to help get real world feedback, and there is someone else on the team working through conceptual details, this need not be prohibited. In fact, in some cases this more closely mirrors what happens in industry: the intertwining of conceptual and visual thinking, along with testing.
     
    Balsamiq is a rapid prototyping tool that allows designers to quickly mock up and test design online using an interface that supplies lots of ready made widgets; many students prefer this to drawing out neat sketches of phones.


  • Summarized from App Inventor: Create your own Android Apps Wolber Abelson,
  • What is MIT App Inventor?
  • Learning – Helping others learn - NESTA
    The Power to do More - Getting the most from your time – Dell
    Community – Bring people together - Omyidar Network
    Travel – Helping people get from A to B - Blackberry RIM
    Money – Making the most of your money - Barclaycard
    Information – Using information for good - Thomson Reuters
    Well-being – Encouraging healthy safe and sustainable lifestyles – Nominet
    Play & Creativity - Games and positive play for social good - CDI Apps for Good
  • Resources – I will be running through these in more detail shortly
    Course management via the platform
    Session plans, reference materials, student activities, troubleshooting guides, tutorials via Educator Zone
    Submit requests and fill expert sessions via the platform

    Regular training opportunities via webinars
    Tune in online to short presentations from the education team followed a Q&A session

    Our certified partners will receive termly in person or Skype visits, a chance for us to see how your course is working on the ground, provide feedback and tailor support. Visits are a chance for us to observe NOT inspect, we are here to help not assess.

    As well as troubleshooting guides on the Educator Zone, you can find an



  • Throughout the course we will send a range of comms from scheduling visits to requests to fill out evaluation surveys.
    We require one member of staff (preferably the lead educator) to oversee all comms from us and ensure they are responded to appropriately

    If there are any changes in staff or prolonged absence – let us know as soon as you can. If you are experiencing difficulties with the course– tell us. If you are doing well – tell us, we want to know.

    If you are experiencing technical difficulties (software or hardware) please check for guidance online before you seek help. We provide guides via the Educator Zone, most software will have their own FAQs and troubleshooting guides online as well.

    If you cannot find a solution to a problem yourself, please in the first instance, reach out to the wider Apps for Good community, the chances is are someone would have experienced a similar problem and will already have a solution.

    I mentioned stack exchange earlier, our Q&A site will connect you with the wider community – more on that later

    Also

    Please do share best practice and any resources you have developed yourselves with our partners and collaborate with local AfG schools

    Go to Pauls Map



  • TTT 2012 slide deck

    1. 1. Train the Trainer 2012
    2. 2. Welcome to AfG Debbie Forster COO
    3. 3. Introducing the team
    4. 4. AfG and being agile
    5. 5. Introducing our growing network
    6. 6. TTT is a meta course: A short programme about a larger programme
    7. 7. Introduction to AfG Richard Smartt
    8. 8. Agenda
    9. 9. A Student’s Perspective http://vimeo.com/29314692
    10. 10. Benefits & Challenges Benefits Challenges Vibrant, engaged cohort Teams working at different paces Student growth Student resilience Student-led progress Avoid over-direction Huge potential for effective Solutions Over-complication if SOW not followed
    11. 11. AfG Lifecycle Overview Richard Smartt
    12. 12. 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design 5:Firstbuild&test The 5-Step approach
    13. 13. refine Lifecycle Attributes: Incremental & Iterative
    14. 14. refine Experts App Inventor SCQA framing Problem video Scenario map Business model canvas Wireframe Pitch Student experience of Apps for Good AppResearch outputs User personas
    15. 15. AfG Session ~50 Minutes
    16. 16. Graphic OrganisersExpert Visits Practical TasksKnowledgebase AfG Sessions
    17. 17. AfG Schedule / SOW No. of weeks (excluding holidays) 26 Session Duration (mins) 50 Guided Learning Hours In classroom [21] + Curriculum Enrichment or other supplementary time [4] 25 Non - Guided Learning Hours inc AFGA Support (6) + App Inventor home study (10) + AFGA Finalist Prep (9) [If Applicable] 25 Total 50
    18. 18. Facilitation Non-directive, adult-to-adult style. Maximised peer learning
    19. 19. AfG Experts –An Overview 1. Market research 2. Business models 3. User Experience Design 4. Development/ Programming 5. Marketing/ customer acquisition 6. Public speaking 7. Intellectual Property Law 1. Problem Selection 2. Advice on Implementing and Pivoting Solutions Ad hoc support
    20. 20. Introducing Smart Phone Apps to students
    21. 21. There’s a recipe for responding CATCH THE BALL! TAG OUT A BASE RUNNER THROW THE BALL COVER A BASE THROW BACK TO PITCHER
    22. 22. Functions an app can use Location services Purchase channel Touch screen and internal sensors (shake, draw, layout) Multimedia (audio, video, stream live) Notifications Connect
    23. 23. Open Source Proprietary Licensed
    24. 24. Unpacking the 5 steps 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design
    25. 25. Introduction to Problem Definition 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design
    26. 26. So what kind of problems are we looking for exactly?
    27. 27. Problem Statement A concise description of the problem to be addressed
    28. 28. THE ‘VEX’ FACTOR Familiar Frequent Specific Irritant Expensive Moves
    29. 29. Familiar Who never wakes up late? Frequent When was the last time it happened to you? Specific The story is easy to tell in a few clear points Example: Ignoring Snooze Button Irritant “So near… but so far” Expensive Missing key appointments Unpredictable Never know for sure when it’ll happen
    30. 30. Individually, describe a problem that fits the criteria below (vex factors) Familiar Frequent Specific Irritant Expensive Unpredict able
    31. 31. Pass your description to the team member on your right; try to improve on the description you’ve received, OR describe a new problem below it.
    32. 32. Framing Problems
    33. 33. Who? What? When? Where? Why?
    34. 34. Who? What? Where? When? Why?
    35. 35. Pick 3 problems that resonate most with the team; briefly describe the ‘5 ws’ for each
    36. 36. Discuss the problems your team identified and take a vote on two problems to explore (one is a back-up) Familiar Frequent Specific Irritant Expensive Unpredict able
    37. 37. What are the specific steps someone experiencing each problem goes through? Tell us the story...
    38. 38. Situation Complication Question Answer The background to the specific issue Explains what the specific issue is A specific inquiry into how the complication can be addressed, given the situation A possible answer to the question SCQA Mapping
    39. 39. Situation Complication Question Answer There are 100 million 12-18 year olds in the developed world A recent poll from the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) found that 61% of employers had encountered problems with young people’s discipline and punctuality. Everyday young people frequently oversleep despite setting alarm clocks. Ignoring the snooze button leads to oversleeping, and costly opportunities are lost such as sitting exams, maintaining a good punctuality record at school, missing out on job interviews and key opportunities in the morning How can we help students to wake up on time and get out of bed promptly? A gamified commuting experience where the user is rewarded for punctual arrival at various checkpoints mapped with Google pins.
    40. 40. Create your team’s SCQA problem framing
    41. 41. Draft a concise description of the exact problem.
    42. 42. Step 1 Review Practicalities Adaptation Key Assignments
    43. 43. Overview of the Build Path “Where is Step 5?”
    44. 44. 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design 5:Firstbuild&test
    45. 45. refine Experts App Inventor SCQA framing Problem video Scenario map Business model canvas Wireframe Pitch Student experience of Apps for Good AppResearch outputs User personas
    46. 46. Introduction to AfG Research 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design
    47. 47. Introduction to AfG Research
    48. 48. Central Questions What are users thoughts about the problem? Can users validate team’s assumptions from Step 1? Feed me, already.
    49. 49. What to look for... Profile Story Obstacles REAL USER REAL USER REAL USER
    50. 50. Research Design: Prospective Questions How old are you? How often do you get out of bed late? How often do you wake up late? What responsibilities do you have in the mornings? Do you use the snooze button? How many times in succession? Have you ever had a wake up call (by telephone)? What is the biggest opportunity you’ve missed through lateness?
    51. 51. Using the web
    52. 52. Write a list of the people you would speak to, and sources you would explore to research the problem
    53. 53. The Problem Video
    54. 54. http://youtu.be/PJUP_OLFDgU Student Example - Good
    55. 55. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7u_2IX_tzx4 Student Example - Poor
    56. 56. STEP 2 REVIEW Practicalities Adaptation Key Assignments
    57. 57. 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design Introduction to Solution Design - Pt 1 Discovering Value
    58. 58. Introduction to Solution Design Pt 1 Discovering Value
    59. 59. Central Questions What are the possible solutions? How do we create value for the users?
    60. 60. Personas
    61. 61. Source: Uxforthemasses.com Example persona
    62. 62. Create a persona representing the likely users of your solution
    63. 63. “Describes how an organization captures, creates and delivers value” Business Model
    64. 64. Put together the business model canvas for the Buzzer Buddies app
    65. 65. Discuss and complete a business model canvas that shows how your app could be structured to create & deliver value
    66. 66. ...describe what should happen Scenario Maps...
    67. 67. From the diary page the user can input daily feelings and notes that they can look back on. They can also rate each day out of 10. The user will select the app form the screen. Here the user can select a page from 3 options. These are: Diary, Goals, and Tips. From the Goals page users can input a goal and when this is achieved it can be turned into some visual prompt – graph. Also they can view finished goals From the Tips page the user can receive a tip daily. Will our product name be memorable enough for people to find the app and download it? This will then be turned into a line graph that would give you tips on how to improve if you get a low score Within each of these pages there may be other pages. For example on the goals page we will have an achievement log with achieved goal and on-going goals This will most likely be a picture of our logo. It would make you enter something you have done to make you feel proud. We can have another aspect of this page that makes people want to come back. When you have reached a certain amount you could get a reward of some sort These could be picture buttons or buttons with text It could play a clip of a song every time you enter something. If you get a high score it will congratulate you. Maybe we could work with companies to get discounts or special offers for users. StepIdeaComment Question Key
    68. 68. Create a scenario map showing what should happen in the solution you have decided upon
    69. 69. STEP 3 REVIEW Practicalities Adaptation Key Assignments
    70. 70. AfG Educator Community Robert Rankin
    71. 71. Overview Educator Zone • Session plans • Activities • Reference • Tutorials AfG Platform • Course management • Request experts • Set, review and publish student assignments Stack Exchange • Ask questions • Access a library of answers • Interact with the AfG community
    72. 72. Educator Zone An open source ‘Wiki’ style site that houses all our educational content and support materials. • No login required • Integrated with our platform • Access our session plans, reference materials and student activities for each step of the course • Find guidance notes, tutorials and information on course delivery and the AfG toolset.
    73. 73. 2011/12 Content: Now available on Educator Zone Session Plan Samples 1-5 : Distributed at end of training on Zip File 2012/13 Content: Available w/b 16th July on Educator Zone AfG Content Timeline
    74. 74. The AfG Online Platform Will enable you to: Run and manage Apps for Good courses. Access resources for delivering Apps for Good sessions Set, review and publish student assignments Connect with experts
    75. 75. Stack Exchange We have set one up for the Apps for Good community that will enable you to: • Post questions and get answers about all things Apps for Good • Access a library of questions and answers focused on the most important topics • Interact with other AfG educators (old and new), our expert community, our content only partners around the world and the AfG team.
    76. 76. Stack Exchange But there is a twist……before our Q&A site can go live, we have to prove ourselves as a community! There are three stages to this process: • Definition - defining the range of topics the site will cover • Commitment - building up members of the community • Beta - site goes live but will be withdrawn if not used frequently
    77. 77. Stack Exchange-Getting Started “Homework” via email: 1. Follow Apps for Good’s proposal link 2. Submit up to 5 questions you think would be useful 3. Pick your top 3 questions and vote them up 4. Pick your bottom 3 and vote them down
    78. 78. End of Day 1
    79. 79. Agenda
    80. 80. Safeguarding/Child Protection Using the Platform  Public website  Students as teams not individuals  Teachers/CDI can edit submissions  No direct contact with teams by public Joint child-protection responsibilities  School & CDI monitor platform jointly  Schools to brief students about online safety and appropriate behavior  Schools to align with their own Acceptable Use & Safeguarding Policies  If school develops ongoing relationship with expert, it can liaise with him/her re: CRB/List 99 if it so desires  If concerns are reported, schools to escalate to their child protection officer and alert Debbie at CDI & joint investigation will be carried out Expert Sessions  Experts NOT required to be CRB’ed  Generally by Skype  Initiated only by teacher  Uses school, not student, Skype accounts  Member of staff must be present
    81. 81. Re-capping on Day 1 Sharing your ideas
    82. 82. 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design Introduction to Product Design
    83. 83. Step 4: Product Design
    84. 84. Precisely how should the interaction be laid out? What should the user experience be? Step 4 Core Question
    85. 85. Intro Screen Select Alarm Record Message Confirmation Screen Add Alarm Sitemap sample
    86. 86. Recipe Browser
    87. 87. Recipe Step Through
    88. 88. Rapid Prototyping (RP) Prototypes are simulations of the product.
    89. 89. KoubachiWeather Birds App Weather watch: Alerts on weather forecast and effect for gardens/plants Information: Nutrients and how to care for garden and plant Visual diary: Plant/garden development Diary: Note progress/concerns: Tags, Student Example - Fair
    90. 90. Have a go creating some of the initial screens for your idea on Balsamiq Mockups
    91. 91. Step 4 Review Practicalities Adaptation Key Assignments
    92. 92. 1: Problem definition 2: Market Research 3: Solution Design 4: Product Design Build Path & Tools
    93. 93. AfG Tool Recap
    94. 94. Using App Inventor
    95. 95. Download Assets for Basic Drum Tutorial www.bit.ly/lSGTA6 AfG Educator Zone App Inventor tutorials www.bit.ly/appinventortutorials Download Dell Streak Driver www.bit.ly/dellstreakdriver 1. Scroll down to the ‘Éclair v2.1’ download and download zip folder 2. Run installation file extracted folder 3. Ensure driver is installed, then reboot laptop 4. Connect Dell Streak to laptop and run App Inventor Blocks Editor (‘Connect to Device’)
    96. 96. APP INVENTOR UI Programming Concepts A I
    97. 97. HTML5 HTML5 + programming Javascript + jquery CSS HTML
    98. 98. MOBILE APPS HTML5 PhoneGap Mobile App (STEP 5)
    99. 99. HTML5 • JSON Facebook API • Timeline Hosting • Heroku /Github Server Side • PHP/ Ruby/ Node.js Database • PostgresSQL Facebook App FACEBOOK APPS
    100. 100. Ending the course & AFGA Coming to the end of the course
    101. 101. AFGA Sponsors
    102. 102. Learning The Power to Do more - Getting the most from your time Community Travel Money Information Well-being Play & Creativity AFGA Categories 2012
    103. 103. •Categories finalised •Competition opens •Entries submitted online •Semi-finalists named •Judging panel chooses finalists •Mentors work with Finalists •Finalists come to London •Presentation to Dragon’s Den panels with Q&A •Elevator Pitch to live audience and streamed on internet •Category winners have paid development team take app to Market AFGA-how it works
    104. 104. In teams prepare a Dragon’s Den pitch-- 30 minutes prep 2 minute pitch Good luck! Your Turn at AFGA
    105. 105. How AfG Maps to Curricula
    106. 106. Mapping AfG to the KS3 ICT National Curriculum
    107. 107. OFSTED What makes a good AfG lesson? What makes a good Ofsted lesson? - new January criteria
    108. 108. Mapping AfG to other curricula
    109. 109. Mapping AfG to other curricula
    110. 110. Assessment • Educators • Experts • Users • Compare with curricula • Good, average, poor • User feedback • Expert feedback • APP Assessment criteria • Educator community • CDI Europe Who? How? Other support
    111. 111. Making AfG Work in Your School Next Steps
    112. 112. How we will work We are here to support you in delivering the apps for good course. We will: • Provide you with the resources to deliver the course through the AFG Online Platform & Educator Zone • Help you connect with experts through our booking system on the platform • ‘Top-up’ training sessions via periodic webinars • Support you through regular visits or virtual catch-ups on Skype to see how you are doing and where we can help (certified only) • Help you find answers to queries and address problems through guidance on the Educator Zone and our Q&A site – Stack Exchange
    113. 113. What we require In order for us to best support you in delivering the course, we need you to:  Have a dedicated point of contact to receive and act upon all AfG communications in a timely fashion  Proactively communicate any difficulties you maybe experiencing  Troubleshoot before you seek help on technical problems  We are a community and as such help each other – we encourage you to connect with and support other partners
    114. 114. Embedding AFG in your School Whole School/ Strategic Level Opportunities  Embedded in policies & practice  Built into school calendar  Influencing pedagogy/practice Cross- Curricular Links Actions  Meet with senior team regularly to update them  Get AFG milestones in calendar  Feed into staff briefings, L&T groups, middle management/SLT  Particularly useful for English, Business Studies, Design & Tech  Opportunities to work at Year Group level, PSHE, Work related learning, etc.  Meet with HODs & HOYs, seek opportunities to bring in “guest speakers”  Explore opps for taster lessons, assemblies, enrichment days Wider school opportunities  PR/Press opportunities  Involvement of parents/local business/governors/PTA  Use of school website/social media  Liaise with SLT on opportunities  Draw on AFG press release templates  Use Twitter @appsforgoodcdi for wider broadcasting
    115. 115. Book planning time with Senior Team member and appropriate staff Open zip files and go onto Educator Zone Do Stack Exchange homework If you are willing to help test AFG platform let Rob know Next steps - within the week
    116. 116. 137 Next steps - within the month Agree with Senior team and staff how you will implement the course, incl recruitment & parents Consider how you can inform/involve other staff and departments Use Educator Zone to access new materials Align AFG planning with school planning to get delivery plan for the year Ensure equipment, software ordered, installed, etc. Begin interacting with network of schools locally and beyond
    117. 117. 138 Next steps - by August Course planning in place for year, 1st half term detailed planning in place Equipment/software in place- Test App Inventor!! Familiar with content & tools-learning content and App Inventor and Stack Exchange Plans for student recruitment in place ready for September launch, including informing parents Plans for promotion in place-incl local press, school newsletter/website, using Twitter, LinkedIn, etc
    118. 118. 139 Next steps - September and beyond School Launch of AFG AFG platform formally launched & teams onboarded Baseline data return completed by educator & students Use Stack Exchange to interact with wider network Onboarding discussions and meetings with Rob & Debbie
    119. 119. Download Session Plan Samples bit.ly/MubxAS These session plans are provided for your reference for the purposes of training. Term 1 session plans and corresponding materials for 2012/13 will be published on the AfG Educator Zone w/b 16/07/12
    120. 120. Evaluation www.bit.ly/AfGtraining (capital A, capital G)
    121. 121. Education – Community Robert.Rankin@cdieurope.eu Partnerships / Senior Team Liaison: Debbie.Forster@cdieurope.eu Evaluation/data Paul.Edkins@cdieurope.eu
    122. 122. Thank you and good luck! www.appsforgood.org Special Thanks to JD Hancock for images CC

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