Age differences in high prevalence of sexual concurrency and concurrent UAI among US MSM

360 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
360
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Age differences in high prevalence of sexual concurrency and concurrent UAI among US MSM

  1. 1. Age differences in high pre alence of se al prevalence sexual concurrency and concurrent UAI among US MSM Eli S Rosenberg, Christine M Khosropour, Patrick S Sullivan 2011 National HIV Prevention Conference 8/15/2011Department of EpidemiologyEmory University Rollins School of Public HealthAtlanta, GA
  2. 2. round [1]:  HIV and MSMV prevalence among MSM is high and MSM continue to bear the V prevalence among MSM is high and MSM continue to bear therden of HIV incidence in the USck MSM continue to be overrepresented among new infectionsreasing HIV incidence among young MSM is most driven by  i HIV i id MSM i td i brease among young black MSMasons for both racial disparity and increase in incidence among ung MSM  remain unclearxual network factors such as sexual concurrency have been ggested as drivers of HIV disparities among MSM   t d di f HIV di iti MSM
  3. 3. round [2]:  Concurrency, illustratedperson has sex with A, B, C A B C time Serial monogamy other situation: A B C time
  4. 4. round [3]:  Concurrency: definitionverlapping sexual partnerships where sexual intercourse th one partner occurs between two acts of intercourse with th t b t t t fi t ithother partner.” Consultation on Concurrent Sexual Partnerships  Consultation on Concurrent Sexual Partnerships UNAIDS. Nairobi, Kenya, 2009 
  5. 5. ds [1]: Checking In: a national web‐based study of MSM aged ≥ 18 years, having ≥ 1 male sex MSM aged ≥ 18 years having ≥ 1 male sexpartner in the p12m, and recruited from social networking websites.networking websitesParticipants completed an online questionnaire  hat included: • Dyadic behaviors for up to 5 sex partners in the p6m• A calendar‐based partnership timing module
  6. 6. ds [2]: Analysis objectives What is the period prevalence of sexual oncurrency in the previous 6 months?oncurrency in the previous 6 months?What differences, if any, exist by participant age?
  7. 7. s [1]:  Participants included in analysis 4,138 answered questions about male sex within the p6m 4,138 answered questions about male sex within the p6m 619 (15%) had no sex in p6m  3,519 (85%) had a sex partner within the p6m 3,519 (85%) had a sex partner within the p6m 989  had 1 sex partner 989 h d 2,530  had > 1 sex partner 2 30 h d 15,782 partner triads for  p concurrency calculations MSM included in analysis:ce/ethnicity:  53% white, 17% black, 14% Hispanicedian age: edian age: 27 years (IQR: 22 – 27 years (IQR: 22 – 38)lf‐reported HIV status: 68% HIV‐, 10% HIV+, 22% untested/unknown 
  8. 8. s [1a]:  Concurrency is a triadic‐level phenomenon An individual with partners yields  3 potentially concurrent triads. 3 potentially concurrent triads
  9. 9. s [2]:  Concurrency, by age group with any concurrent partnerships, p6m Age: 18 – 19 18  20 20– 24 25  25 – 29 30  30 – 39 40  40 – 49 50 + 50 + (n = 310) (n = 861) (n = 545) (n = 585) (n = 471) (n = 236) n 34 % 41 % 43 % 46 % 52 % 47 % (n = 218) (n = 630) (n = 378) (n = 427) (n = 347) (n = 179)with >1  49 % 57 % 61 % 62 % 70 % 62 %erslder men significantly more likely than younger men to g y y y gave concurrent partners (both trend p < .0001)
  10. 10. s [3]:  Biological relevance: concurrent UAI, by age group with any concurrent UAI triad, p6m (UAI with both partners) Age: 18 – 19 20– 24 25 – 29 30 – 39 40 – 49 50 + (n = 252) (n = 691) (n = 458) (n = 474) (n = 376) (n = 196) n 16 % 13 % 14 % 17 % 21 % 18 % (n = 171) (n = 475) (n = 301) (n = 331) (n = 262) (n = 140)with >1  23 % 19 % 20 % 25 % 31 % 26 %ersh levels of concurrent UAI, with modest but significant  erences by age (p = 0.007, 0.008) erences by age (p = 0 007 0 008)
  11. 11. s [4]:  Triadic findings: concurrency and concurrent UAI, by age groupurrency and UAI among triads of MSM with > 1 partner Age: 18 – 19 20– 24 25 – 29 30 – 39 40 – 49 50 + (n = 1,533) (n = 4,216) (n = 2,715)  (n =3,404) (n = 2,633) (n = 1,281) adj. pent triad 29% 30% 32% 36% 39% 38% 0.00026m among:rent triads 38% 27% 28% 26% 36% 37% pncurrent triadsncurrent triads 18% 17% 16% 19% 24% 21% interaction Prevalence OR  2.8 1.8 1.9 1.5 1.8 2.3 0.10ociation between concurrency and UAIviously undocumented compound risk valent by age groupsociation between concurrency and UAI, across all ages OR [95% CI]alence OR 1.9 [1.7, 2.1]
  12. 12. usions:SM reported a high prevalence of concurrency , particularly  p g p y,p yong those ≥ 30 years old• May  be attributable to different  norms on monogamySM also reported a high prevalence of concurrent UAIsociation between triadic concurrency and UAI suggests  nt risk that requires further characterizationomparing MSM to heterosexuals in the US : At least 4x more concurrency among MSM  + the greater transmission efficiency of UAI    = more expected transmission among MSM, despite   more expected transmission among MSM despite
  13. 13. ance:ontributions First estimates of concurrency from a large, national study of MSM and  of concurrent UAI at individual and triadic levels While prevalence is high, concurrency  may be modifiable, potentially  While prevalence is high concurrency may be modifiable potentially making it a high‐impact target in the MSM epidemic.mitations Individual‐level analyses allow measurement of the extent of  concurrency and associated factors, but cannot be directly related to  concurrency and associated factors but cannot be directly related to incidence 
  14. 14. Thanks!!se stop by our other Checking In presentations: cruitment and Retention of Racial/Ethnic Minorities in an Online HIV ehavioral Risk Study of MSMehavioral Risk Study of MSM Christine Khosropour ‐ Vancouver/Montreal @ 3:30‐home HIV testing of MSM Enrolled in an Online HIV Behavioral Risk Study h HIV t ti f MSM E ll d i O li HIV B h i l Ri k St d Christine Khosropour ‐ Vancouver/Montreal @ 3:30 What Extent is Serosorting Intentional among MSM in the United States? Erin Kaufman – Poster #054M, Monday work supported by NIH grants:R01HD067111 RC1MD004370  RC1MD004370

×