Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality

612 views

Published on

An overview of how my PhD has developed so far. Using a transdisciplinary approach to examine the knowledge UK farmers’ practice when assessing soil quality

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality

  1. 1. Stephen Jones BSc (hons), MSc PhD Student, University of Nottingham
  2. 2. Overview • Before my PhD • Pathway and supervisors • My original project • Where it all went wrong • Refocused project Stephen Jones
  3. 3. Before my PhD • BSc (hons) Human and Physical Geography • 2007-2010 • Electrical and Battery recycling compliance scheme • 2010-2013 Stephen Jones • MSc Environmental Management • 2013-14
  4. 4. PhD Pathway • Awarded funding through ESRC Doctoral Training Centre • 4 year interdisciplinary pathway - Energy, Environment and Society Pathway • PhD + 1 years worth of taught research training modules Stephen Jones
  5. 5. PhD – Supervisors 3 supervisors and an advisor: • Carol Morris - Geography • Susanne Seymour - Geography • Sacha Mooney – Biosciences • Chris Stoate – GWCT Allerton Project Stephen Jones
  6. 6. The Project Title: A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones
  7. 7. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones • Combining soil and social sciences as well as drawing upon both academic and non-academic bodies of knowledge. • an integrative approach is vital if seeking to solve “real world problems” (Hadorn et al., 2008)
  8. 8. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones • More specifically East Midland farmers’…
  9. 9. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones • Productivist (Burton et al, 2008) • Scale of thinking • Know-how vs Know-why (Ingram, 2008) • Problems and Gaps: Knowledge types, differences within farming, the effect of this knowledge on the soil?
  10. 10. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones • Knowledge can only exist through being practiced • “If something is real this is because it is part of a practice. It is a reality enacted” (Mol, 2002) • Anti-perspecivalist • Multiple realities - there is not one nature or countryside, “but multiple natures and multiple countrysides because of people’s diverse spatial practices” (Macnaghten & Urry, 1998)
  11. 11. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones • Although recognition of the importance of soil is nothing new, until towards the end of the 20th century the concept of soil quality was primarily concerned with soils ability to provide food (Lal, 2008). • More recently a more holistic concept of soil quality has emerged which acknowledges the key role soil plays in a variety of issues facing the world today. • Soil Health, Security, Sustainability…? (Figure based on McBratney et al, 2012)
  12. 12. The Project A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Aim: To use a transdisciplinary approach to examine the knowledge-practices farmers employ in managing soil quality and see how this relates to the scientifically measured soil quality in the field. Objectives: • Use a transdisciplinary approach that draws upon both soil and social science disciplines as well as both non-academic and academic bodies of knowledge. • Identify the knowledge-practices which farmers in the East Midlands employ when seeking to manage soil quality. • Investigate where these knowledge-practices come from and how they relate to and interact with one another. • See if the use of different knowledge-practices affects the quality of the soil in the farmers’ fields as measured scientifically by soil quality indicators
  13. 13. Planned Methodology Stephen Jones
  14. 14. Planned Methodology Soil Quality Analysis Stephen Jones • Soil Quality Indicators • Selected on the basis of: • Being sensitive to the local context in terms of policy, geography and the needs of stakeholders (Doran, 2002) • Providing a mix of chemical, biological and physical indicators. • What is understandable and potentially reusable by the farmers going forward. • Being relatively quick and easy to measure. • Clusters of neighbouring farms – Relative indicator of soil quality
  15. 15. Planned Methodology Stephen Jones
  16. 16. Where it all went wrong Stephen Jones Depth vs Breadth Understanding vs Statistical Power
  17. 17. Where it all went wrong Stephen Jones How can you say it’s the knowledge affecting soil quality?
  18. 18. Where it all went wrong Stephen Jones “This is two PhDs” 1. The effect of management practices on soil quality 2. The knowledge that farmers use to manage soil quality • Both sides weakened by the demands of the other. • Lack of integration and complementarity between the two disciplines
  19. 19. Where it all went wrong Stephen Jones Problems : • 2 PhDs • How can you say it’s the knowledge affecting soil quality? • Clusters • Tensions between Quan and Qual
  20. 20. Refocus on assessment A transdisciplinary examination of UK farmers’ knowledge-practices in relation to soil quality Stephen Jones Aim: To use a transdisciplinary approach to examine the knowledge-practices farmers employ in managing assessing soil quality and see how this relates to the scientifically measured soil quality in the field a scientific assessment of soil quality. Objectives: • Use a transdisciplinary approach that draws upon both soil and social science disciplines as well as both non-academic and academic bodies of knowledge. • Identify the knowledge-practices which farmers in the East Midlands employ when seeking to manage assess soil quality. • Investigate where these knowledge-practices come from and how they relate to and interact with one another. • See if the use of different knowledge-practices affects the quality of the soil in the farmers’ fields as measured scientifically by soil quality indicators • Compare farmer’s assessments of soil quality to a scientific assessment.
  21. 21. New Planned Methodology Stephen Jones Interviews and observations. How do farmers assess their soil quality? Soil Quality Analysis using SQI’s Compare the results of the two assessments and discuss with the farmer
  22. 22. Where it all went wrong Stephen Jones Problems : • 2 PhDs • How can you say it’s the knowledge affecting soil quality? • Clusters • Tensions between Quan and Qual
  23. 23. New Challenges Stephen Jones Problems: • “Soil Quality” – leading language? • Farmer trust Unknowns: • Sampling? • Is knowledge still the best framework?
  24. 24. Moving Forward Stephen Jones • Continue to develop my project • Attending workshops • Pilot study – summer 2016
  25. 25. Thank you for listening Stephen Jones lgxsrj@nottingham.ac.uk
  26. 26. References Stephen Jones • Burton, R., Kuczera, C., & Schwarz, G. (2008). Exploring Farmers' Cultural Resistance to Voluntary Agri‐environmental Schemes. Sociologia Ruralis, 48(1), 16-37. • Doran, J. W. (2002). Soil health and global sustainability: translating science into practice. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 88(2), 119-127. • Hadorn, G. H., Biber-Klemm, S., Grossenbacher-Mansuy, W., Hoffmann-Riem, H., Joye, D., Pohl, C., Wiesmann, U., & Zemp, E. (2008). The emergence of transdisciplinarity as a form of research. In G. H. Hadorn, S. Biber-Klemm, W. Grossenbacher-Mansuy, H. Hoffmann-Riem, D. Joye, C. Pohl, U. Wiesmann & E. Zemp (Eds.), Handbook of Transdisciplinary Research (pp. 19-39). New York: Springer. • Ingram, J. (2008). Are farmers in England equipped to meet the knowledge challenge of sustainable soil management? An analysis of farmer and advisor views. Journal of Environmental Management, 86(1), 214–228. • Lal, R. (2008). Soils and sustainable agriculture. A review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development, 28(1), 57-64. • Macnaghten, P., & Urry, J. (1998). Contested natures. London: Sage. • McBratney, A. B., Minasny, B., Wheeler, I. and Malone, B. P. (2012) Frameworks for Digital Soil Assessment, in B. Minasny, B. P.Malone and A. B. McBratney (eds.), Digital Soil Assessment and Beyond. London: Taylor and Francis, pp. 9–14. • Mol, A. (2002). The body multiple: Ontology in medical practice. London: Duke University Press. • Tress, B., Tress, G., & Fry, G. (2005). Defining concepts and the process of knowledge production in integrative research. In B. Tress, G. Tress, G. Fry & P. Opdam (Eds.), From Landscape Research to Landscape Planning: Aspects of intergration, education and application (pp. 13-26). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer.

×