Junior college night presentation 2012 for posting

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  • SCWe’re excited to start our work with the Class of 2014One of the things I like best about my job is that it’s cyclical. Every year we get the chance to meet and work with a new group of students who have a whole new range of interests and who investigate new colleges. This start of the process is always exciting because everyone is eager and interested in seeing what’s out there; There’s just a nice feel.We hope the parent panel was a helpful start to this process and that our comments tonight will help guide you and give structure to the coming year, helping you feel prepared and in control.On your way in, we hope you picked up your family’s copy of the College Planner. If not, please pick it up on the way out. I’m not sure if you watched the video clip I emailed last week as a reminder for tonight’s program but if not, you might want to unearth it. It might make you feel a little better and maybe laugh at the start of this process. I think if you can remember to laugh once in awhile and not take everything too seriously. I know there are conversations like this one that happen here all the time. One parent shares something and then everyone else gets nervous and does something too. I think the key thing to remember over the course of the coming year is to try to stay focused on your family’s college search and what is best for you and your child. Be realistic and don’t abandon all common sense. It will be ok.
  • SC-At Flint Hill, we feel strongly that the college search is about more than applying to college – It’s about knowing yourself, evaluating choices, and learning to make good decisions-It’s important to remember that any one college is not well suited to every student’s needs and so while there are a lot of “good” colleges, they aren’t all a good match for each student-In recent times, the notion that there is one perfect college out there for each student has materialized – it’s important to remember there are a lot of great schools that will be well suited for each student; the goal is to find 6 to 8 good matches to which to apply-The idea that there is one “perfect” school puts a great deal of pressure on students and is somewhat stifling on the search – we encourage students and parents to keep an open mind and consider a broad range of optionsResearch all types of college choices and use that information to define and/or test preferences Visit different types of schools – large and small, urban and ruralEven if you think you know what you want, visit something different to confirm your thoughts
  • SCThe mission of the college counseling office is to support students and families throughout the college search and application process.We do this by providing guidance about what to do at each point in the process; helping you stay on top of things throughoutWe serve as advocates for our students throughout the process through our letters of support and our relationships with admission officers at a wide range of collegesWe help students a lot, but we don’t do the process. We will give timelines and advice and coach students in interactions with admission reps but we will have the student complete each step.Please remember that admission reps and the media offer advice aimed at the general population – often the advice being given is the normal way things are done at Flint Hill – when you hear things in the media or on college visits, please remember they are speaking to a large group of students in all types of educational settings.We are the litmus test for information and rumors…please check in with us if you hear something that just doesn’t sound right; remember that families often speak anecdotally but generalize and so what was really a very unique situation can sometimes be relayed as commonplacePlease also remember that everything you read in the papers or hear on the news is not necessarily true; Sensationalism and playing on fears in an increasingly competitive environment sells many more papers than focusing on the positive facts that most students do get into their first choice and have good options
  • SC-There’s a thriving grapevine at Flint Hill – and in every community really – about the college search process. Some of the information out there is accurate but some just isn’t A couple years ago a family came back from a college visit at the University of Richmond and wanted to check in with us on something they had heard. They had run into another family from Flint Hill who warned them that AP scores from Flint Hill wouldn’t count at Richmond. No reason why but because they’d heard it, it must be true. It’s not and if you encounter something like this that just doesn’t sound right, please ask.If something sounds funny, please check with us and don’t take as fact things you hear on the sidelines of the football field or over cocktails at a party
  • SCThroughout the program tonight we have quiz questions. We hope that these questions will help both inform you and get you thinking about options you may not have previously considered.Here is the first quiz questions.The answer is D. 24There is often a grain of truth to rumors but remember not everything you hear or read is true.
  • SCThroughout the program tonight we have quiz questions. We hope that these questions will help both inform you and get you thinking about options you may not have previously considered.Here is the first quiz questions.The answer is D. 24There is often a grain of truth to rumors but remember not everything you hear or read is true.
  • SCNote that everything we’re covering is the PlannerHighlight Junior SeminarsWe have a variety of programs throughout the year to provide guidance and structureThe College Planner is a good resources for the whole process. Some will go home tonight and read every page while others will toss it in the trunk of the car and find it when they drop their junior off at college. Whatever works for your family is great.
  • SCSenior Year Programs
  • SC – COver the past 3 years representatives from 275 colleges have visited Flint HillThese visits are a great opportunity for students to learn more about a school and for them to learn about Flint HillWe value them but don’t read too much into these visits – who visits and who doesn’t – UVa has visited just three times in 13 years and yet UVa is the school at which the most FHS alums have matriculated
  • SC – COver the past 3 years representatives from 275 colleges have visited Flint HillThese visits are a great opportunity for students to learn more about a school and for them to learn about Flint HillWe value them but don’t read too much into these visits – who visits and who doesn’t – UVa has visited just three times in 13 years and yet UVa is the school at which the most FHS alums have matriculated
  • SCOne thing that families sometimes struggle with during the college search and application process is managing stress; one of the best ways to manage stress is to stay current with the different facets of the process. If you get behind, you feel stressed just trying to catch up. Read our information, use the timelines, and do your best to stay on track in order to do things at the right time so you aren’t playing catch up.In the parent section of the planner, there is a listing of several good resources about the college search – be sure to read broadly and don’t rely on just one source for your information.Promote resources – College Unranked, Colleges That Change Lives, Acceptance
  • SCOne thing that families sometimes struggle with during the college search and application process is managing stress; one of the best ways to manage stress is to stay current with the different facets of the process. If you get behind, you feel stressed just trying to catch up. Read our information, use the timelines, and do your best to stay on track in order to do things at the right time so you aren’t playing catch up.In the parent section of the planner, there is a listing of several good resources about the college search – be sure to read broadly and don’t rely on just one source for your information.Promote resources – College Unranked, Colleges That Change Lives, Acceptance
  • SCCommunication is really an essential part of an effective college search. Be sure to keep talking throughout the process and start with questions like this. It’s important for both students and parents to know how the other feels.- Be honest with one another- Students share your true goals and interests- Parents share your limitations at the beginning – financial, distance, whatever; It’s understandable that there will be limitations to consider when beginning the college search just be sure to share them so that everyone knows what they are and can develop appropriate expectations
  • SCOne of the hardest concepts to grasp in the college search and what leads to the most unease is the idea that students can be qualified for admission – meaning they meet the minimum academic requirements for admission – but they may not be competitive or the most appealing applicant. At schools where a majority of the applicants are accepted, in most cases students who are qualified for admission and to complete the graduation requirements of the college are often accepted. At schools where the acceptance rate is low – probably 30 percent or less – students must not only be qualified for admission, they must be competitive or appealing to the school. Each school has priorities and each application reader has affinities; the students who help a school meet their enrollment priorities and/or appeal to the application reader are more competitive We’ve all heard of the straight-A student with “perfect” SAT scores who wasn’t admitted to some prestigious college; First, we have to remember we probably haven’t actually seen the student’s transcript or test scores – our impression may not be accurate Second, the student may be a very strong student academically but he may not make contributions; a majority of the more competitive schools strive to create a community through their admission process and so a student who doesn’t contribute to his/her community and/or school in high school isn’t likely to contribute in college and so this student may not be appealing in the admission processLastly, it’s often really hard to imagine just how “good” other kids can be…at very competitive places, the strength of the applicant pool is pretty difficult to imagine but in these pools, it’s likely that more valedictorians will be denied than admitted, more students with perfect test scores will be denied than admitted, etc.-Introduce Naviance – we have a powerful tool to help families determine where the student might fit at a wide range of colleges. We subscribe to Naviance, an online database, to which every junior and his/her parents will receive an account next month. We urge you to use this tool which Mr. Kane will describe shortly.
  • SCAs you start your search, it’s helpful to know where you fit academically – in the Planner you’ll find some information about the profile of the current senior class and because these stats remain pretty consistent from year to year they should be helpful to you in assessing where you fitAn important thing to keep in mind as you consider where you fit is that there are options for every student no matter what your GPA and test scores – they may be different than a student who has stronger or weaker academic credentials but you WILL find good options/good schools – always remember thisAnswer –D- 3.39
  • SCAs you start your search, it’s helpful to know where you fit academically – in the Planner you’ll find some information about the profile of the current senior class and because these stats remain pretty consistent from year to year they should be helpful to you in assessing where you fitAn important thing to keep in mind as you consider where you fit is that there are options for every student no matter what your GPA and test scores – they may be different than a student who has stronger or weaker academic credentials but you WILL find good options/good schools – always remember thisAnswer –D- 3.39
  • SCRemember that places have changed – your perceptions may be really out of date and places that were once not well thought of may now have very strong, appealing programs and may be quite selective and no longer be the back-up you think it is.One of the things we hope to share with you tonight is just how much things have changed in the world of admissions and how your perspective may need to change as well. One of the things I hear often is “if don’t get into X, I’ll just go to Mason”. Mason, though, like lots of schools has become much more competitive. This is not meant to scare you, it’s meant to help you understand where you may or may not fit so you can make good choices about where to apply. The Answer to this question is A
  • SCThis isn’t intended to scare you. It’s meant to help you understand the context of the applicant pool better so that you can make good choices and realize that schools may have a different student body on campus than you might expect given previous experience or impression of a school.
  • SCA trick question. All of these schools have an acceptance rate to medical school that is greater than 50%. Juniata is the highest at 89% followed by Pitt at 77%, Wm & M at 75% and Rutgers at 59%.Sometimes the most competitive or prestigious school isn’t the best way for your to get to where you want to be and you can get there from the place where you will feel more comfortable and better able to achieve.
  • SCA trick question. All of these schools have an acceptance rate to medical school that is greater than 50%. Juniata is the highest at 89% followed by Pitt at 77%, Wm & M at 75% and Rutgers at 59%.Sometimes the most competitive or prestigious school isn’t the best way for your to get to where you want to be and you can get there from the place where you will feel more comfortable and better able to achieve.
  • SCWe really encourage families to think broadly about the many options out there. Obviously there will be some parameters to consider – they may be financial, they may be geographic, they may be personal but we urge you to really research choices before discarding them as you may be surprised.Answer is BConsideration of financial circumstances is part of any good college search; every school is different but it’s important to remember that different schools have vastly different resources and the tuition rate is not necessarily the actual price paid so in some cases a private school may end up being less expensive than a public option; you’ll never know unless you apply so we encourage you to keep an open mind about this and other factors
  • SCWe really encourage families to think broadly about the many options out there. Obviously there will be some parameters to consider – they may be financial, they may be geographic, they may be personal but we urge you to really research choices before discarding them as you may be surprised.Answer is BConsideration of financial circumstances is part of any good college search; every school is different but it’s important to remember that different schools have vastly different resources and the tuition rate is not necessarily the actual price paid so in some cases a private school may end up being less expensive than a public option; you’ll never know unless you apply so we encourage you to keep an open mind about this and other factors
  • SCCollege – no matter public or private – is expensive so it’s not a surprise when families want to know if it’s worth the investment. This is a bit of a trick question – They all rank in the top 25 in terms of return on investment of tuition dollars according to Bloomberg Businessweek. Harvey Mudd ranks 1st followed by Babson at 11th, Lafayette at 17th and Stevens at 23rdHarvey Mudd graduates have the top starting salaries of all top liberal arts college graduates according to Payscale.com.
  • SCCollege – no matter public or private – is expensive so it’s not a surprise when families want to know if it’s worth the investment. This is a bit of a trick question – They all rank in the top 25 in terms of return on investment of tuition dollars according to Bloomberg Businessweek. Harvey Mudd ranks 1st followed by Babson at 11th, Lafayette at 17th and Stevens at 23rdHarvey Mudd graduates have the top starting salaries of all top liberal arts college graduates according to Payscale.com.
  • JRDuring high school I worked at our local grocery store, no one had ever heard of the college I attended. That’s ok!Consider a variety of sources – don’t base everything on one guide, one friend’s opinion, one anecdote. Be a little skeptical. Consider where the information is coming from. College website is obviously biased, as are emails from schools. Some college-related websites are basically chat rooms- these aren’t experts! When to visit – weekends, spring break, summer, and fall holidays. Consult school’s calendar or call their admissions office for warnings about dates students aren’t on campus. NO JUNIORS!
  • JRThink Twitter and blogs are just for 20-something hipsters? Think again. Colleges around the country use Twitter, blogs, Tumblr, Pinterest, Facebook and other social media to interact with students and share their campus with the world. *Like a college admissions office’s Facebook page. They will often update this page with pictures, admissions announcements and fun factoids to keep students (and parents!) in the know. * Follow a school on Twitter. Want late breaking news straight from the college campus? Interested in up-to-the-minute reports from faculty and staff? Want to know what the geology department is up to? Twitter shoots out short (140 characters or less) bursts of information, including pictures. And the instant delivery means you don’t have to stalk the college on Facebook!* Subscribe to the admissions office’s blog. Colleges spend many hours crafting an online presence through their blog. Reading can humanize the process and unlock some of the mysteries behind the gates of an admissions office. Go inside by logging on.Tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram, too many to name! If you’re interested in connecting with a school, log on to their admissions website. They will usually link to any of their social media outlets. The Choice by NYTDean J on Twitter A Warning Sure, your Facebook picture is hilarious. Most colleges can’t afford to spend valuable time hunting you down on the internet.Friending colleges on Facebook or following them on Twitter can be helpful, but make sure your profile picture or comments won’t hurt you in the process.  Here’s a good rule of thumb: Don’t post anything you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see! Admissions counselors may be younger than her…
  • JRWho?You cannot miss class to visit campuses as a Junior. Days are not excused.Bring mom and dad. They’re a piece of the decision making process as well! Don’t forget little brother or sister. My sister knows me TOO well and can see, with different eyes, where I might fit.What?Take the official campus tour and then take your own tour of the town, campus, bookstore. Go off the beaten path and explore.Information sessions are just that- informative! Bring a pen and paper. And make sure to take down the name of the person who hosts.Personal interview- depends on campus, another contact point, opportunity for individual attention.When?Avoid summer or holiday vacations, spring break, exam periods, any time when campus will not be its usual selfWhere?You can start local- to refine your sense of what you’re looking for. Start with some big, some small, urban, rural, and then expand search based on what you liked/didn’t like.
  • JRWhy?No commitment- other than tank of gas, easy way to see for yourselfBecause you’re going to be living here for the next four years. Would you rent an apartment without seeing it first? You get to know the PEOPLE, not just the images of a campus. These two ideas can be very different in your mind vs. reality.Some campuses will track which students and future applicants visit their campus- part of demonstrated interest.How?Each school is different. Some ask for you to call their office, others have online form.
  • JRAnswer is B
  • JRAnswer is B
  • JRAptitude vs. AchievementSATAptitude test- tests critical reasoning, what you can learn/deduce from information.3 Pieces- Critical Reasoning, Mathematics, and a required Writing Test.ACTAchievement test- tests what you have learned in school5 components- English, Mathematics, Reading, Science, and an optional Writing TestHip new trend called Score Choice – how it confuses the issue – note colleges will generally use your highest score of any typeAllows student to choose which test date(s) to release. Promise you a college only wants the highest test scores
  • JRJust emphasize that the ACT is as commonly accepted and used now as the SAT and students should take the one they feel suits them best.Answer is C
  • JRJust emphasize that the ACT is as commonly accepted and used now as the SAT and students should take the one they feel suits them best.Answer is C
  • JRGrowing number of colleges are offering score-optional programs; some will accept SAT Subject Tests in lieu, others ask for additional essays or teacher recommendationsPolicies vary greatly but if standardized testing has been an historical challenge, these schools might provide good opportunitiesrange of schools –from Arizona State to Wake Forest to Bowdoin, etc.
  • JRNote these are our suggestions but student/family schedules may dictate that another sequence is better
  • JRIf more test dates are needed, there are plenty in the senior year but plan ahead and watch for conflicts with sports, college visits, etc.Fall can be a busy time! This all adds up…
  • JRTwo sets of testing lends more validity to scores- first time jitters? Having two sets gives you a better picture of range
  • JRWe don’t see huge jumps in scores after test prep for a majority of students. Some kids actually see scores decline and many stay in a pretty similar range.If doing test prep, consider student’s learning style and schedule. There needs to be buy-in from the student in order for him/her to get anything out of it. It’s a considerable commitment of time and money so be sure it is the right type and at a time when the student can really invest in it.Just a note that the practice test results are often much higher than what the student scores on the actual test – in our experience.
  • AKWe will begin scheduling the family conferences in mid-January, and they will take place during the student’s free period.For the past few years virtually every family has gotten one of the top two choices in terms of dates so please don’t be anxious about getting an appointment when it is convenient for you. The Family conferences will take place between the beginning of February and the end of April. The college survey that the student will fill out in Naviance MUST be completed by noon the day before the family conference (or by noon on Friday if the meeting is on Monday). Juniors, the survey will be made available to you when we have our seminars in December. If the survey is not completed when indicated, the meeting will be rescheduled. We tell juniors this every year, and every year when the survey is not completed, they seem surprised that we reschedule the meeting. And don’t forget, students, it is not just you but your parents who are being rescheduled. So please be considerate of everyone involved and consider this the first of many reminders to have the survey completed in the necessary timeframe.
  • AKThe family conference will be a personal meeting in which the student, parents, and college counselor will all participate and we want the conference to be an interactive discussion. It is an opportunity for us, your college counselors, to learn about both the student and family goals for the college search. It will be a discussion of the student’s academic record as well as advice on senior year course selection. It is an opportunity to note both strengths and concerns in the record and future schedule plans. We will be able to review the testing sequence and it is a chance for all to discuss any individual areas of concern. After the meeting, your college counselor will put together a list of suggested schools based on everything discussed on the meeting. I just want to make a quick note about that list we generate. In the early stages of the process, we are trying to help students take a broad approach to the search, look at a big list and narrow it down. In the past, some have seemed to be upset by some of the schools we put on the list. That is never our goal. These lists are suggestions, not judgments or anything like that. There are 2200 4-year colleges and universities in the United States and we want to make sure that our students and families are aware of the many different opportunities available to them. 
  • AKAfter the Family Conference, the next step is to begin developing a college list. There are several resources that you can use, and the first is a list of suggestions that we’ll provide for you after our meeting. These suggestions will be based on the preferences that you give us and they are certainly not meant to limit you—the list is just a starting point for your research.  In addition to using our suggestions, we also encourage all families to use our Naviance program.  Naviance has a few purposes: 1. It houses basic information about each student including contact information, GPA, and test scores.2. It allows families quick access to information about thousands of colleges3. It keeps track of each student’s applications4. It also maintains a history of past Flint Hill students and their application decisions. The program is easy to learn and navigate, and it’s proven to be a very helpful tool for our families. Because it’s such an important resource, right now I’m going to give you a quick preview of the ways that we can use it.  LOGIN INFORMATION: schiarolanzio@flinthill.org / husky09 Each student has an individual account, and juniors are going to be logging into your accounts for the first time during the Junior Seminars in just a few weeks. Shortly after that, we’ll email parents with login information so that they can also manage their own accounts and use the program.  On the first page, I can see messages about upcoming college visits (Christopher Newport), as well as helpful links to the Common Application website, College Board, ACT, and a few others. Under the About Me tab, I can see personal information, as well as information about my parents and the GPA. The test score link gives us a snapshot of all tests that have been taken. There is a resume builder that we will use during the Junior Seminar. You can actually print out different versions of your resume and include them with your applications if you’d like.  Under the careers tab, you can access surveys that may be helpful for you as you consider what is important to you in a college. During our seminars, we will be doing the Do What You Are survey which is a personality test that may give you some ideas about possible careers.   Under colleges I’m apply to, is a list of applications that I have already submitted to the college counseling office. From this page, I can quickly see the deadlines for each college, whether or not the college accepts the Common Application, and the status of each application (each of these says “Initial materials submitted” which means that I’ve submitted my application and I’m waiting for a decision).  Also on the left, there is a link for colleges I’m thinking about. This is where I can keep a list of colleges that I’m considering as I’m building my list. [Go to college visits] I can also view a list of colleges that are visiting Flint Hill. Right now this list is very short because we only have two visits left this fall, but as Mr. Callard mentioned already, at one point there were about a hundred schools on this list. I can sign up for a visit online as well.  Under college lookup, I can type in the name of a college and immediately gain access to information it. (type in example) From this page, I can access a tour of the campus, link to the college website, and find contact information for the admissions office.  I can also see how I compare to other Flint Hill students who have applied to Virginia Tech and have been admitted.  I can see a snapshot of our admission history [point out last year], also information about deadlines. College search is also a helpful tool [demonstrate]. The scattergram function is probably one of the more popular parts of Naviance because it is a quick way to see how you compare to past applicants from Flint Hill. I am going to pick a popular college because it will provide lots of data [show JMU].  On one axis is GPA and on the other is SAT score. Each symbol represents a Flint Hill student who applied to JMU in the past three years. The green squares are students who were accepted, the red x’s are students whose applications were denied, and any blue diamonds represent students who were deferred or were waitlisted. I am represented by the red circle. This is obviously a helpful tool because it can quickly show you where you stand and really, if it’s appropriate for you to consider this college. From this scattergram, I can tell that JMU is a place that would be reasonable for me to consider.  Keep in mind that scattergrams are certainly not intended to predict admissions decisions (especially because they don’t take into account any personal qualities such as activities, essays, or recommendations). However, they can help families to set realistic expectations and to make informed choices when building a college list. Finally, I have to show you my favorite function on Naviance. If you click on college maps, you can see all the colleges that have accepted Flint Hill students! Please be assured that our students have hundreds of excellent choices! Again, we will spend a lot more time exploring Naviance during the Junior Seminars, but also keep in mind that this is just one of several resources that is available to you.
  • AKAs you build your list, you should aim to apply to a reasonable number of schools. It is not necessary to apply to 26 schools, as a student has done in the past. Ultimately, that yielded about the same number of acceptances as the student who applied to 7 institutions and at the end of the day, you can only attend 1 school. What I have learned since is that when students are applying to that many colleges, it’s because either they haven’t done their research, or they’re really nervous about getting into college.  We encourage our students to apply to 6-8 colleges. Within that list, there should be at least 2 likely options, 2-4 possible options, and maybe 2 colleges that are a reach from the admission standpoint.  I’ve heard some students say that they think applying to a large number of colleges will increase their chances of being accepted. Unfortunately, college admissions just doesn’t work that way and this isn’t a good strategy. The “Law of Averages” does not apply here. This is especially true if you plan to fill your list with reach colleges. Remember that each college has a unique applicant pool, so a decision that is made at one school has absolutely no impact on a decision that is made at another school. While it’s really easy to get excited about the reach schools that are on your list, we always encourage our students to spend just as much time—if not more—researching their likely and possible options. We can’t emphasize enough how important it is that you like all of the schools on your list and you should only apply to colleges that you would actually attend if they were your only choices. Making good decisions now will yield options next spring.
  • AKLet’s have another quiz - see if you can put these schools in order from the lowest acceptance rate to the highest acceptance rate.
  • AKAll of these schools have competitive admissions processes, but I think some of you might find these results surprising. What stands out to me is that a lot has changed in the past few years and schools that used to be accessible to a wide range of students are now extremely competitive. This is why it is important to use resources such Naviance to make sure that you are making informed decisions.
  • AKAfter you are happy with your college list, the next step, of course, is to apply! Most applications are due between November and February. This seems like a long way off right now, but keep in mind that senior year is really busy with classes, sports, clubs, and other activities, and the deadlines will be here before you know it.  To alleviate some of this stress, we highly recommend that students use the summer to get started on applications. You can access most applications by mid-summer and the Common Application will be available August 1. It is especially helpful if you work on your essays during the summer, but at the least you should begin filling out the personal information on the applications. Keep in mind that anything you can do early will help you out later. It’s also a good idea to get organized BEFORE the school year starts. Make a list of what is required by each college, and figure out a system that will help you to stay on top of all of the deadlines and everything you need to do. Over the summer, our office is open and we will be available to you. You can look for a mailing from us that will include a calendar of the coming year—this should also help you to plan ahead and stay organized. Remember, anything you can do over the summer will help you out later on. 
  • AKOne of the items that we will send you over the summer is a list of deadlines for submitting applications to our office. Basically, you should be prepared to submit an application to us about 3 weeks before it is actually due to the college. This will give us time to review each application and to meet with each student to offer suggestions. Because each of us has worked in admissions offices, we are able to give feedback from the standpoint not only of a college counselor, but also of an admissions committee. We often hear from families whose seniors have graduated that the review process was one of the most helpful parts of our program, and we hope that you will find that to be true as well.
  • AKAfter we offer our suggestions, it is up to the student to make any changes and then submit the application to the college before the deadline. The student is also responsible for submitting official SAT or ACT scores to each college on his or her list. I’m going to say that again, because we have a little bit of trouble with it every year: the student is responsible for submitting their portion of the application as well as having the official SAT or ACT scores sent to each college to which he or she is applying. Our office is responsible for writing the counselor recommendation, which is the official school letter of support, and filling out any secondary school reports. We also collect your teacher recommendations and submit them, along with our part, the transcript, and a school profile that provides information about Flint Hill. Next fall, we will go into a lot more detail about submitting applications, and you can also read more about how this works in your planner.
  • AKThe correct answer is D - the average number of applications submitted by Flint Hill seniors is 7.  This is a very good thing – colleges know applications from here are “real”, representing sincere interest and kids who have been thoughtful about where to apply end up with better choices for themselves in the end.
  • AKThe correct answer is D - the average number of applications submitted by Flint Hill seniors is 7.  This is a very good thing – colleges know applications from here are “real”, representing sincere interest and kids who have been thoughtful about where to apply end up with better choices for themselves in the end.
  • AKThe next step in the application process is just to wait, and for some students, this can be the hardest part.  Try to find some distractions, find a new hobby, and most importantly remember that it’s okay to talk about things other than college. It’s also okay to keep this process private. You don’t have to share admissions decisions or even the places you have applied with other people. If it will help you to keep it within your family, that is perfectly fine. I am the youngest of 10, so you can imagine what I dealt with when I decided to keep my college search process relatively private. I still had a whole lot of thoughts and opinions coming at me all the time. Finally, try to keep a healthy perspective on where this process fits in the larger scheme of your life. Try your best to keep your anxiety in check - and I am talking to both students and parents here. Parents, please try to remember that your anxiety rubs off on your kids; if they see that you are anxious, it will only make it more difficult for them to manage their own stress. And the last thing we want is for everyone involved to be stressed out.are anxious, it will only make it more difficult for them to manage their own stress.
  • AKThe last step, of course, is to make good decisions! As you consider your acceptances, keep in mind what is most important to you and what you value in a college experience. Take a look at what each choice can offer you and which college is the best fit for you. The National Candidate’s Reply Date is May 1 - this is a date that colleges have agreed upon to mark the end of the application process. By this date, students should have committed to one college. You will hear us say that this process is about so much more than getting into college. Yes, that is one of the goals, but we also feel that this is a learning process, an opportunity to take ownership of your future, and we hope that you’ll also be able to look back on it in that way, preferably with a smile.
  • SCCertainly we want students to find colleges they are excited about but we also look at this process as something bigger than just finding a school.Learning how to make good, informed decisions is a great life skill and this process allows that in a very supportive settingOur primary hope is that students will assess themselves so they know what they need to maximize their potential
  • SCJuniors – you need to take ownership of this process. There are lots of adults around who could do it for you - and who will step in if you don’t – but then you’ll end up at a great college for us, your friends, your teachers or your parents…you want to end up at a college that’s a great match for you.You must be honest with yourself about what you want and need and what will help you be successful – sometimes what you want and need are different things – you need to be strong enough to accept thisYou need to do the research and you need to develop preferences – just sort of going along for the ride isn’t going to help you find the right places.It’s important to remember that it’s ok for you to have preferences – your parents will likely have some parameters for your search but they will still likely leave you with a lot of leeway for deciding what setting is best for you – you need to do thatYou need to figure out how to manage all of the details of the application process and you need to be responsible about it
  • SCParents have an important role in this process but it is often a behind-the-scenes roleParents are usually much more experienced organizers and time managers – these roles are great supports for students and are most appropriateIt’s really important to be honest with your child about your expectations and limitsIt’s also essential that you help your child be honest with him/herself so you can all set reasonable expectationsAs hard as it can be, it’s important to remember that students are likely going to approach this process at their own pace and so while we may be advising families to visit colleges over spring break, your child may not be ready then and it might be best not to push the issue; you know your child best – be prepared to push when you think it will help but also to let them direct the process if they just aren’t ready – this can be really uncomfortable and stressful but it may help the student manage the search better and ultimately end up making better decisions – situation with Brendan who is exactly the type of kid who will thrive in college but just hadn’t heard the right things yet – then he sat in on a college visit and learned about a special program that seems like a perfect match for him – all of a sudden he wants to find other places like it; it was an anxious time for a bit for his parents but in the end, he will now find better places for him.
  • SC – BMy sense is the root of the anxiety that surrounds this process is the desire to know that we or our children will be “ok”. Our students have been very fortunate in recent years, despite all the of the coverage this process gets that might suggest otherwise. Here are some examples of how successful they have been.
  • SCAnswer is C
  • SCIf you followed the news reports any spring for the past dozen, it would be hard to know that any students had any college choices let alone several. Students in the Class of 2012 had a good numberAnswer is DAs you think about this process, remember a student can only attend ONE college; there’s no need to apply to huge numbers of schools in order to yield a reasonable number of choices; the more thoughtful you are during the search and application process, the more thoughtful and less stressful your actual decision-making process can be
  • SCIf you followed the news reports any spring for the past dozen, it would be hard to know that any students had any college choices let alone several. Students in the Class of 2012 had a good numberAnswer is DAs you think about this process, remember a student can only attend ONE college; there’s no need to apply to huge numbers of schools in order to yield a reasonable number of choices; the more thoughtful you are during the search and application process, the more thoughtful and less stressful your actual decision-making process can be
  • When I first started at Flint Hill in the summer of 1999, my boss commented to me about how for every parent of every kindergartener, Harvard is still an option. This was an interesting perspective and one I hadn’t thought of. When a child is young, the sky’s the limit – we don’t know yet who they will become and see only the potential.As kids grow, we as parents begin to see better their potential – their strengths and the things that make them struggle.My first boss gave me some very good advice that year and that was to remember as you go through this process, it is not about self-worth as a student or a parent. It’s about finding the place where you or your child will succeed. Harvard may still be an option – but just because it’s an option that doesn’t mean it’s the right one. Be thoughtful and reflective and you will find a great match.Thank you for comingWe appreciate your timeIf you have any questions, please feel free to see us
  • Junior college night presentation 2012 for posting

    1. 1. Find YOUR MatchJunior Family College Night November 8, 2012
    2. 2. Find YOUR Best Match• Know Yourself• Determine What You Need to Be Successful• Research Your Options• Make Informed Decisions• The Myth of the Single Perfect College Finding Your Way
    3. 3. How We Help• The College Counselors Facilitate the Student’s Search – We Provide Support – We Provide Guidance Regarding the Steps of the Process and Resources – We Advocate for Our Students – We Do NOT Do the Search; Rather, We Teach Students What to Do – We are the Litmus Test for Rumors Finding Your Way
    4. 4. FACT or FICTION?Rumors about this process abound. Be sure toask if you hear something that doesn’t makesense or that seems too good (or bad) to betrue. Finding Your Way
    5. 5. FACT or FICTION?Rumor has it that gaining admission to theUniversity of Virginia from Northern Virginia ismore difficult than from other parts of thestate. How many of the 25 high schools thatsend the most students to UVA are located inNorthern Virginia? A. 10 B. 14 C. 17 D. 24 Finding Your Way
    6. 6. FACT or FICTION?The answer is D – 24 of the 25 schools thatsend the most students to UVA are located in“northern Virginia”. Finding Your Way
    7. 7. Our Program• The College Planner• Junior Seminars – Topics: Self-Assessment, Intro to Naviance, Campus Visits, Application Essay, Pre-summer Check-in• College Conference for Juniors (April 4th)• Family Conferences in the Spring• Evening Programs on Specific Aspects of the Search• Summer Essay Workshops Finding Your Way
    8. 8. Our Program• Senior/Parent College Night in the Fall• The Senior Binder• Senior Seminars – Topics: Application Workshop/Mock Admissions, Financial Aid and Scholarships, Senioritis, Money Management• Individual Senior Check-ins• Application Review Service• Visiting College Representatives Finding Your Way
    9. 9. What Do You Think?• The number of colleges and universities that sent representatives to visit Flint Hill this year is: • A. Around 50 • B. Around 65 • C. Around 85 • D. Around 100 Finding Your Way
    10. 10. What Do You Think?• This year approximately 85 colleges visited Flint Hill School. On average, 85-100 schools visit each fall, giving our students the opportunity to learn more about their programs. Finding Your Way
    11. 11. The College Search: Step by Step• Keep Informed• Use the Resources Provided• Stay Current with the Process Finding Your Way
    12. 12. The College Search: Step by Step• There are many great resources available (and many not-so-good ones) for families. These are good ones to consider:Colleges UnrankedColleges that Change LivesAcceptanceCrazy UCollege Admission from Application to Acceptance Finding Your Way
    13. 13. Step 1: Family Discussion– Parents, ask yourself: • What do I want for my child with regard to college and his/her future? • What setting will allow my child to thrive?– Students, ask yourself: • What am I looking for from the college experience? • What kind of school will help me reach my goals?– Both Consider: • What are my concerns for the college search? • What role will each of us play in this process? • How will we stay organized? Finding Your Way
    14. 14. Step 2: Student Self-Assessment• The College Survey – Each student will complete an online survey on our Naviance site• Where Do I Fit Academically? – Honestly assess your academic record – your course load, your grades, any upward or downward trends, your standardized test scores – Use Naviance – Am I “Qualified”? – Am I “Competitive”? Finding Your Way
    15. 15. What Do You Think?The average GPA of this year’s senior class is: • A. 2.95 • B. 2.97 • C. 3.02 • D. 3.39 Finding Your Way
    16. 16. What Do You Think?The average GPA of this year’s senior class is 3.39 Finding Your Way
    17. 17. How Have Things Changed?Many schools have changed since weopened the West Campus, let alone sincetoday’s parents applied to college.Lowest Flint Hill GPA accepted in 2002 at:Elon University – 2.9James Madison University – 2.8Vanderbilt University – 3.2 Finding Your Way
    18. 18. How Have Things Changed?Lowest Flint Hill GPA accepted in 2012 at:Elon University – 3.5James Madison University – 3.3Vanderbilt University – 4.1 Finding Your Way
    19. 19. You Can Get There from HereWhich school has a higheracceptance rate to medical schoolthan the national average of 50%? • A. Juniata College • B. College of William & Mary • C. Rutgers University • D. University of Pittsburgh Finding Your Way
    20. 20. You Can Get There from HereThis is a bit of a trick question. All ofthese schools have a medical schooladmission rate higher than the nationalaverage. In order, they are: Juniata College at 89% University of Pittsburgh at 77% College of William & Mary at 75% Rutgers University at 59% Finding Your Way
    21. 21. You Can Get There from HereWhich school’s graduates have thelowest level of loan indebtedness upongraduation? • A. University of California at Berkeley • B. Harvard University • C. Stanford University • D. College of William & Mary Finding Your Way
    22. 22. You Can Get There from HereSome schools have tremendous financialresources, making them more affordablethan others might seem at first glance.Of these schools, Harvard’s graduateshave the lowest form of loanindebtedness. Finding Your Way
    23. 23. It’s Expensive, What’s it Worth?Which of these schools madeBloomberg’s Businessweek’s list ofschools with top return on tuitioninvestment? • A. Harvey Mudd College • B. Babson College • C. Lafayette College • D. Stevens Institute of Technology Finding Your Way
    24. 24. It’s Expensive, What’s it Worth?Again, a bit of a trick question. All of theseschools made the Bloomberg’sBusinessweek List for return on tuitioninvestment. They were ranked as follows: Harvey Mudd College - 1st Babson College – 11th Lafayette College – 17th Stevens Institute of Technology – 23rd Finding Your Way
    25. 25. Step 3: Research• Virtual: College Websites and Other College- related sites• Junior Seminars and an Introduction to Naviance• Local College Fairs and Information Sessions• Remember the library? College Guide Books and References• Snail Mail and Email from Colleges• Campus Visits – Juniors should not miss school for college visits; any such visits will not be considered “excused” Finding Your Way
    26. 26. Step 3: Research• Twitter• Facebook• Blogs• Instagram• Caution! They can see you… Finding Your Way
    27. 27. Campus Visits• Who? – Seniors are granted 3 excused absences• What? – Campus Tour – Information Session – Personal Interview – Sit in on Classes – Stay Overnight• When? – Avoid vacations, breaks, exams, etc.• Where? – You can start local! And then hit the open road… Finding Your Way
    28. 28. Campus Visits• Why? – No commitment. – It’s all sunny days and grassy lawns until you see campus for yourself. – Make some friends. – It looks good.• How? – Visit college’s website – Call the Admissions Office Finding Your Way
    29. 29. What Do You Think?• FHS School policy allows SENIORS how many excused absences to visit colleges?• A. 1• B. 3• C. 5• D. 8 Finding Your Way
    30. 30. What Do You Think?• Seniors may take 3 excused absences to visit colleges. Finding Your Way
    31. 31. Step 4: Standardized Testing• The Options – The SAT Reasoning Test – The ACT with Writing• Score Choice – What Is It? – How Does It Impact You? Finding Your Way
    32. 32. What Do You Think?• Which is true?• A. The College Board administers both the SAT and ACT.• B . The ACT and SAT are similar in design.• C. Both the ACT and SAT are accepted by almost all colleges and universities in the U.S.• D. Every college requires the SAT or ACT for Admission Finding Your Way
    33. 33. What Do You Think?The requirements for standardized testing in thecollege application process have changed quite abit over the past 15 years.Many schools no longer require standardizedtests and both the ACT and SAT are accepted byalmost all colleges and universities in the U.S. Finding Your Way
    34. 34. What if I’m Not a Good Tester?Many, many colleges no longer require the submission of standardized test scores as part of the application process. The Fairtest site provides a comprehensive listing of these schools and what they do require in lieu of test scores. www.fairtest.org Finding Your Way
    35. 35. Standardized Testing• The Sequence – Begin standardized testing in the spring of junior year. – The SAT Reasoning Test: • Precalculus or higher- the January test date is recommended • Algebra II/Trigonometry or a preceding course- the March and/or May test dates – The ACT: • February for those in Precalculus or higher; • April for those in a preceding course Finding Your Way
    36. 36. Standardized Testing: The Sequence• Continue with testing in the fall of senior year, if necessary• Fall SAT Test Dates: – October, November, December• Fall ACT Test Dates: – September, October, December Finding Your Way
    37. 37. Standardized Testing: The Key• Be sure to have two sets of standardized testing by the end of junior year so that you can accurately assess your place in the applicant pools of the colleges in which you are interested.• Two sets = 2 SATs, 2 ACTs or 1 of each test Finding Your Way
    38. 38. Standardized Testing: The Preparation• We encourage students to take the SAT and/or ACT without commercial test prep for the first administration• Students ARE encouraged to prepare themselves with practice tests and other resources such as www.number2.com, a free test prep site• If test prep is necessary, consider the best educational setting for the student as well as his/her schedule and choose the program that is best suited in order to encourage full investment by the student Finding Your Way
    39. 39. Step 5: The Family Conference• Scheduling will begin mid-January• Family Conferences will be available between February 4th and April 30th• College survey on Naviance MUST be completed by noon the day before the family conference (Friday for Monday sessions) or by April 3rd for conferences on April 4th or later. Finding Your Way
    40. 40. The Family Conference: What to Expect• A personal meeting that will allow us to learn about the student’s and family’s goals for the college search• A discussion of the student’s academic record, noting strengths and concerns• Advice regarding senior year course selection• Testing Sequence, if necessary• An opportunity to discuss individual areas of concern• A list of suggested colleges based on our meeting Finding Your Way
    41. 41. Step 6: Begin Developing a List of Potential College Choices• Use our Naviance site – access will be provided to juniors and parents in December.• Be honest about where you/your child fits• Research schools of interest through visits and other personal contact Finding Your Way
    42. 42. Be reasonable in your approach to the application process• Compose a list of 6 to 8 colleges to which to apply – 2 “likelies”, 2 – 4 “possibles”, and 2 “reaches”• Make application choices that will yield options at the end• LIKE all of your choices Finding Your Way
    43. 43. What Do You Think?Which Schools Accept the Fewest Applicants?Are They Close? – University of Miami – Northeastern University – University of Virginia – Wake Forest University Finding Your Way
    44. 44. What Do You Think?Were You Correct? – University of Virginia – 33.3% – Northeastern University – 34.5% – University of Miami – 38.3% – Wake Forest University – 39.9% Finding Your Way
    45. 45. Step 7: Complete Applications• USE the Summer! – College Counseling Office Summer Mailing• Confirm admission requirements of chosen schools and plan testing calendar and a schedule to meet each• Submit applications to the FHS College Counseling Office – Students will receive a calendar of important dates in July to aid in planning and alleviate stress Finding Your Way
    46. 46. Step 8: Application Review• Students submit applications by designated college counseling office deadlines• Student’s college counselor reviews the applications, providing feedback and suggestions• Student and counselor meet to review application suggestions Finding Your Way
    47. 47. Step 9: Submit Applications• Students submit all student portions of the application, including the essay and standardized test scores• The FHS College Counseling Office gathers teacher recommendations, school profile, college counselor recommendation, and student transcript and submits by the application deadline Finding Your Way
    48. 48. What Do You Think?• What is the average number of applications submitted by Flint Hill students?• A. 17• B. 12• C. 10• D. 7 Finding Your Way
    49. 49. What Do You Think?• For many years, the average number applications submitted by Flint Hill seniors is 7. This number is very reasonable and indicates our students are making thoughtful and good choices. Finding Your Way
    50. 50. Step 10: Wait• Find distractions• Protect privacy• Talk about things other than college• Keep anxiety in check Finding Your Way
    51. 51. Step 11: Make Good Decisions• Receive decisions• Consider acceptances• Make good decisions based on self-analysis and what each choice can offer Finding Your Way
    52. 52. Our Goals• Students learn how to make good, informed decisions• Students have choices• Students are happy and find schools which both challenge and support them in order to maximize their potential Finding Your Way
    53. 53. Student Responsibilities• The student MUST own this process• The student MUST assess his/her own strengths and challenges• The student MUST research options• The student MUST complete the application process and attend to its details Finding Your Way
    54. 54. Parent Responsibilities• The parent must help his/her child assess him/herself honestly and objectively• Be honest about expectations/limitations from the outset of the search• The parent should facilitate campus visits• The parent should help the student keep organized• The parent should NOT complete the process• If the student is not taking ownership of the process, the parent SHOULD initiate conversations about the student’s thoughts about college, being willing to consider the student may want to take some time off before attending college Finding Your Way
    55. 55. What Do You Think?• The 117 members of the Class of 2012 received how many offers of admission? – A. 552 – B. 457 – C. 402 – D. 312 Finding Your Way
    56. 56. What Do You Think?• The 117 members of the Class of 2012 received acceptances from how many different colleges? – A. 97 – B. 152 – C. 192 – D. 227 Finding Your Way
    57. 57. What Do You Think?• Each of the 117 seniors in the Class of 2012 had an average of how many admission offers from which to choose? – A. 2.83 – B. 3.47 – C. 4.02 – D. 4.50 Finding Your Way
    58. 58. What Do You Think?• The Class of 2012 received 457 offers of admission from 192 different colleges. On average, each student received 4.5 offers of admission. Finding Your Way
    59. 59. Good Luck! Finding Your Way

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