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Practical Tips for Staying Up-To-Date in
Technical Areas
Jean C. Sack, MLS
Public Health Informationist
CCHI Presentation
...
2
Learning Objectives
• By the end of the session, participants will be
able to:
• Make decisions about search approaches ...
What tools are essential for information
exchange today?
 Person to person
 Mailed letters and documents
 Fax exchanges...
How are Christian Medical Organizations
using these tools now?
4
Members of the African Christian Health Association
Platf...
ICHAP has information to share! How?
5
Because Health Workers Matter: They Need Our Support
http://www.africachap.org/x5/i...
What do you know and do already?
 Name a successful search for information
 From a colleague? Through a group email or C...
Why Search for Technical Information?
• Prepare or update national standards or guidelines
• Write concept note or brief
•...
Reflections
Think again about your experience with searching for
technical information. What has worked well? Have you
exp...
Tamponnement intra-utérin par ballonnet
Un atelier pour les agents de santé de
première ligne
In the language(s) of your
c...
Guiding Principles for Information Searching
10
Recency
Look at last 5 years (with exceptions)
Authority
Does author or or...
Relevance
• Relevance to location, project, culture
• Critical thinking about type of source
• Use professional networks
•...
WHO Guidelines – use digital!
12
http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/arv/arv-2016/en/
10 Mb
(download at
night!)
4 pounds/1.8 kg
Di...
Setting up alerts for topics from journals
13
Follow-up on current, relevant articles by creating
free citation alerts on ...
14
Select only the most appropriate alerts!
Grants and Foundation information
15
Free access ENOCH PRATT
Emailed alerts to grants,
fellowships, training: NIH
Use HINARI for more full text documents!
http://www.who.int/hinari/en/
Only qualified agencies in Low
income countries can...
Sign on to HINARI to search PubMed
17
HIN010
This CCIH training password
expires on June 22, 2016
Finding recent studies of typhoid in Nepal
18
A relevant
search can act
as an alert
Jhpiego technical information and training
21
www.reprolineplus.org
Authority
• What does “authoritative” mean for searching?
• Trusted source: Has a vetting process through
technical expert...
Beall’s Lists of Predatory journals and
publishers – Open Access
23
• For profit
publishers are
fishing for
reviewers =
wa...
Examples of Authoritative Sources
• WHO
• USAID’s DEC
• JHU’s POPLINE
• Jhpiego’s ReproLinePlusSM
• PubMed (National Libra...
Recency
• Exceptions to the 5-year window:
• Background: Provides overview that is still valid
• Topic-Specific:
• Fast-ch...
Check a resource for updates
Nepal study conducted on 5000 pregnant women
 Women who received two doses of albendazole
ex...
Check PubMed under author & subject
27
Think of a current topic – find MeSH terms
Zika virus Ebola
28
Less Credible Sources
• “Grey” literature
(self-published by
organizations)
POPLINE, USAID DEC,
Population Council, FHI
• ...
Signing Up for E-Mail Alerts
• Many excellent sources offer e-mail alerts
• How it works:
• Choose search terms or topics
...
Set up an NCBI alert to a topic
32
Use HINARI for more full text documents!
33
http://www.who.int/hinari/en/
More training is available in video & step by st...
Training materials for HINARI and other
34
Searches on PubMed can be simple
1. Use a technical area word with AND Nepal
2. Narrow to 5 years
3. Expand the format to ...
HIN010 50483 (training active until Dec. 7)
36
Free membership in NCBI for PubMed
37
38
39
40
S
41
Find Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) or
Apply limits to search
42
Let’s all practice one search on HINARI
 Sign into HINARI
http://www.who.int/hinari/en/
 Use your agency log-in and pass...
Other Possible Sources to Use in a
Search Strategy
 Google or Google Scholar (scholar.google.com/)
 PubMed for journal a...
45
Finding updates is important!
46
Consulting Experts or Leaders
• Leaders in different disciplines, organizations
• Know their core strengths
• Harness thes...
Summary
• On-going need to access up-to-date information
• Guiding principles for searching: Relevance,
Authority, Recency...
Thank you!
Questions?
Jean.sack@jhpiego.org
55
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Practical Tips on Research Jean Sack

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Information specialist Jean Sack of Jhpiego describes information tools to help researchers find information in academic journals, WHO resources, and other sources, including information on funding opportunities.

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Practical Tips on Research Jean Sack

  1. 1. Practical Tips for Staying Up-To-Date in Technical Areas Jean C. Sack, MLS Public Health Informationist CCHI Presentation June 18, 2015
  2. 2. 2 Learning Objectives • By the end of the session, participants will be able to: • Make decisions about search approaches for the kind of information or knowledge needed • Use HINARI access to PubMed for full text journal retrieval • Create a strategy for repeated searches or alerts to meet a need • List key sources of technical resources to consult or reference supporting the major technical areas • Consider starting Communities of Practice for CCIH members
  3. 3. What tools are essential for information exchange today?  Person to person  Mailed letters and documents  Fax exchanges  Phone conversations  Emails, Yammer,  Skype, Adobe Connect, Webinars  Blogs and social media  Publications databases 3
  4. 4. How are Christian Medical Organizations using these tools now? 4 Members of the African Christian Health Association Platform [ACHAP] gathered for the opening of the World Health Assembly Geneva May 2016
  5. 5. ICHAP has information to share! How? 5 Because Health Workers Matter: They Need Our Support http://www.africachap.org/x5/images/smilies/because%20h ealth%20workers%20matter%20-%20final.pdf
  6. 6. What do you know and do already?  Name a successful search for information  From a colleague? Through a group email or CoP?  Through a database or an alert to a topic?  In a document or references?  From a librarian?  Tell us about a failure to find data or information  Because of external factors: time, connectivity, experts  Because don’t know how to do it  May not be available in language of user 6
  7. 7. Why Search for Technical Information? • Prepare or update national standards or guidelines • Write concept note or brief • Contribute to technical working group • Inform and adjust project design • Create bibliography for a proposal • Write background and discussion section of journal article • Stay up-to-date in your field • Give a lecture or presentation as an expert in your field 7
  8. 8. Reflections Think again about your experience with searching for technical information. What has worked well? Have you experienced challenges in translating it for workforce? Write it down – we will find some answers at the end! 8
  9. 9. Tamponnement intra-utérin par ballonnet Un atelier pour les agents de santé de première ligne In the language(s) of your choice…
  10. 10. Guiding Principles for Information Searching 10 Recency Look at last 5 years (with exceptions) Authority Does author or organization have a record of credibility? Relevance Is the information relevant to the country or regional context?
  11. 11. Relevance • Relevance to location, project, culture • Critical thinking about type of source • Use professional networks • Value of expert opinion • Ask as part of search process  Name three technical resources that are important to you! • 11
  12. 12. WHO Guidelines – use digital! 12 http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/arv/arv-2016/en/ 10 Mb (download at night!) 4 pounds/1.8 kg Digital is easy to search and share portions! Fits on thumb drive /computer
  13. 13. Setting up alerts for topics from journals 13 Follow-up on current, relevant articles by creating free citation alerts on the journal homepage!
  14. 14. 14 Select only the most appropriate alerts!
  15. 15. Grants and Foundation information 15 Free access ENOCH PRATT Emailed alerts to grants, fellowships, training: NIH
  16. 16. Use HINARI for more full text documents! http://www.who.int/hinari/en/ Only qualified agencies in Low income countries can register!
  17. 17. Sign on to HINARI to search PubMed 17 HIN010 This CCIH training password expires on June 22, 2016
  18. 18. Finding recent studies of typhoid in Nepal 18 A relevant search can act as an alert
  19. 19. Jhpiego technical information and training 21 www.reprolineplus.org
  20. 20. Authority • What does “authoritative” mean for searching? • Trusted source: Has a vetting process through technical expertise (e.g., WHO); trust accuracy • Updating process: Has a systematic process for updating information (Jhpiego; K4Health; Popline) • Organizational values (reputation of WHO or UNFPA) • NOT on Beall’s list of predatory journals but IS ON PubMed/Medline’s indexed journals 22
  21. 21. Beall’s Lists of Predatory journals and publishers – Open Access 23 • For profit publishers are fishing for reviewers = wasted time! • Some journals use conference proceedings to request articles and charge too much money • These publishers and journals are not recognized by PUBMED https://scholarlyoa.com/2015/01/02/bealls-list-of-predatory-publishers-2015/
  22. 22. Examples of Authoritative Sources • WHO • USAID’s DEC • JHU’s POPLINE • Jhpiego’s ReproLinePlusSM • PubMed (National Library of Medicine) • International Professional Association Conference Proceedings (e.g., FIGO) 24 Look for these top. level domains: • .gov • .edu • .org
  23. 23. Recency • Exceptions to the 5-year window: • Background: Provides overview that is still valid • Topic-Specific: • Fast-changing science (e.g., HIV) • On-going research not yet approved by boards (e.g., pharmaceuticals) • Context-Specific: Recent events affect suitability of information (e.g., safety, reliability, availability) • Negative Recency Factor: Tragic news; “fanfare” for a popularized commodity 25
  24. 24. Check a resource for updates Nepal study conducted on 5000 pregnant women  Women who received two doses of albendazole experienced less severe anaemia (Hb <7 g/L)  The study also reported increase in birthweight after two doses of albendazole (mean difference=59g).  The studies in Nepal ,Sri Lanka also reported a beneficial impact of antihelmenthics on infant survival.  Nepal study showed a decreased risk of infant mortality at 6 months . RR = 0.59 26
  25. 25. Check PubMed under author & subject 27
  26. 26. Think of a current topic – find MeSH terms Zika virus Ebola 28
  27. 27. Less Credible Sources • “Grey” literature (self-published by organizations) POPLINE, USAID DEC, Population Council, FHI • Non-indexed, non-peer- reviewed, for-profit journals Check Bealls List or AOJ • Commercial websites Perhaps for products or drugs 30 Use critical thinking with sites that have these top.level domains: • .com • .net
  28. 28. Signing Up for E-Mail Alerts • Many excellent sources offer e-mail alerts • How it works: • Choose search terms or topics • Enter your e-mail address • As new material becomes available that matches your criteria, you receive an e-mail with links to the material • See NCBI PubMed for how this works 31
  29. 29. Set up an NCBI alert to a topic 32
  30. 30. Use HINARI for more full text documents! 33 http://www.who.int/hinari/en/ More training is available in video & step by step how tos!
  31. 31. Training materials for HINARI and other 34
  32. 32. Searches on PubMed can be simple 1. Use a technical area word with AND Nepal 2. Narrow to 5 years 3. Expand the format to abstract 4. Check those most relevant 5. Save, email, put in your NCBI bibliography 6. Follow newer citations (to right of key articles) 7. Notice review articles! 8. Look at bibliography on best articles 9. Use the Medical subject headings (MeSH) 35
  33. 33. HIN010 50483 (training active until Dec. 7) 36
  34. 34. Free membership in NCBI for PubMed 37
  35. 35. 38
  36. 36. 39
  37. 37. 40
  38. 38. S 41
  39. 39. Find Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) or Apply limits to search 42
  40. 40. Let’s all practice one search on HINARI  Sign into HINARI http://www.who.int/hinari/en/  Use your agency log-in and password  Jean Sack is using HIN010 50483  Do a simple search on a topic of your choice –15 minutes for this tutorial! 43
  41. 41. Other Possible Sources to Use in a Search Strategy  Google or Google Scholar (scholar.google.com/)  PubMed for journal articles (www.nlm.nih.gov/ ) or key journals on topic  Document repositories:  RH and MNCH Training manuals (www.reprolineplus.org)  Respectful maternal care (http://whiteribbonalliance.org/)  World Health Organization (www.who.int )  USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse (www.dec.usaid.gov )  POPLINE reproductive health literature database (www.POPLINE.org)  Nepal Health Research Council (www.library.nhrc.org.np )  DOVE (www.stopcholera.org )  As needed:  Manufacturer websites  Asking expert opinion through networking (such as through listservs: CoPs or e-mail discussion lists) 44
  42. 42. 45
  43. 43. Finding updates is important! 46
  44. 44. Consulting Experts or Leaders • Leaders in different disciplines, organizations • Know their core strengths • Harness these sources as needed • How do you build a network? • Exposure to an event: training, meeting, conference • Establish relationships • Maintain contact and active membership • Ask for support • Acknowledge received support and tell them how you used their support 48
  45. 45. Summary • On-going need to access up-to-date information • Guiding principles for searching: Relevance, Authority, Recency • Good sources include: ReproLinePlus.org, WHO.int, dec.usaid.gov, popline.org • Tap into expert opinions 51
  46. 46. Thank you! Questions? Jean.sack@jhpiego.org 55

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