CCIH 2013 Plenary 2 Global Response to SGBV Jacqui Patterson

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Jacqui Patterson of the NAACP shares global statistics on sexual and gender-based violence and addresses how Christian churches are handling the challenge, in both negative and positive ways.

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  • This template can be used as a starter file for a photo album.
  • Caption: Vegetables sprout in a Rio Coco gardening plot in Nicaragua where CWS programs are helping indigenous people achieve food security.Caption: A beneficiary of the Rural House Repair & Construction in Gantier & Boen, a partnership between CWS and Christian Aid, implemented by Servicio Social de Iglesias Dominicanas, standing in front of her home, nearly completed.:JenifferSindiri checks supplies in the business she began after learning to read and write at a CWS-sponsored literacy program in Kenya.
  • A young resident of the Dereig Camp with her pencil and workbook. Darfur, SudanCaption: Young girls attend classes in Nov. 2009 at the CWS-sponsored school in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where CWS now is responding to a devastating earthquake.CWS and partner support for innovative greenhouse gardening is enabling families in the highlands of Guatemala to improve their nutrition and their income.
  • CCIH 2013 Plenary 2 Global Response to SGBV Jacqui Patterson

    1. 1. Faces and Voices of Global Sexual Gender Based Violence
    2. 2. FOUR STORIES
    3. 3. IPV and SGBV Babita
    4. 4. Nepal • “He would beat me to the point that he was too ashamed to take me to the doctor. He forced me to have sex with him and beat me if I refused. Even when he was HIV-positive he still wanted sex. He refused to use a condom.” --Babita • “He used to force me to have sex with him. He would beat me and slap me when I refused. He never used a condom with him . . .. When I got pregnant I went for a medical check-up. When I gave birth, and the child had passed away, they told me I was HIV-positive. I cried. The doctor told me, “Wipe your tears, the whole world is sick.”
    5. 5. Climate Change and SGBV Susan
    6. 6. Conflict and SGBV Famatta
    7. 7. Liberia • During the 2002-2003 civil crises, Famatta was gang raped by a general and his body guards. • She reported the rape to her father but he felt powerless to help her. • A few months after the rape, Famatta began to feel ill; suffering from chronic diarrhea. She was pregnant. When she visited the hospital, she was diagnosed HIV positive. • Her partner abandoned her and her twin sons. Famatta believes that she acquired HIV/AIDS as a result of the rape.
    8. 8. SGBV and HIV Joyce
    9. 9. SETTING THE CONTEXT
    10. 10. Global SGBV Statistics • A multi-country study by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that 59% of women in Ethiopia and 50% in Bangladesh reported sexual violence by an intimate partner; and 34% of women in Brazil and 47% in Tanzania said they had experienced physical violence.4 • A multi-site study by the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) found that almost 40% of Indian women interviewed reported physical violence; 26% reported severe physical abuse – of whom half reported being beaten during pregnancy.
    11. 11. Global SGBV Statistics Cont’d • In Kenya, a Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed 68% of women agreed that a husband would be justified in beating his wife, including if she refused to have sex with him. • Reports from a range of nations, including Thailand, South Africa, and New Zealand indicate that between 20 and 44% of men admit that they are violent towards their wives or intimate partners.
    12. 12. Underpinning Social Determinants • Patriarchy • Sexism • Racism/Xenophobia • Unequal Distribution of Resources
    13. 13. Proximal Exacerbating Factors • Community/Societal attitudes condoning violence against women and girls • Lack of access to quality, appropriate health related messages and services • Lack of Female Controlled Prevention Methods • Harmful traditional practices/norms • Homophobia
    14. 14. High Risk Settings/Circumstances • Marriage/Intimate Partner Relationships • School • Immigration • Trafficking/Coerced Labor • Commercial Sex Work • Disability • Injecting Drug Use • Humanitarian Crises—Conflict/Disaster • Food/Water Insecurity • Immigration • Climate Change and Its Myriad Impacts
    15. 15. THE ROLE OF THE CHURCH
    16. 16. Churches—Mixed Messages
    17. 17. MOTHER’S DAY AND FATHER’S DAY SERMONS FOCUS ON RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN HUSBANDS, WIVES, AND FIANCÉS. THEY SHOULD RESPECT AND LOVE ONE ANOTHER. MESSAGES WE DELIVER, “HUSBAND LOVE YOUR WIVES. WIVES RESPECT YOUR HUSBANDS.”- “AS A PASTOR AND COUNSELOR I GO AND SAY TO THE HUSBAND, ‘ACCORDING TO THE BIBLE. YOU CAN’T BEAT ON YOUR WIFE. YOU CAN’T LOVE SOMETHING AND TRY TO DESTROY IT. YOU HAVE TO STOP DOING THIS THING.’ USUALLY, AS A PASTOR AND RESPECTED PERSON, I GET A GOOD RESULT.” SOMEONE TRIED TO BE VIOLENT AGAINST HIS WIFE. CHURCH STEPPED IN AND SUSPENDED HIM INDEFINITELY FROM MEMBERSHIP. HE WAS A CHURCH LEADER. THEY TOOK DECISIVE ACTION TO DISCOURAGE SUCH BEHAVIOR AMONG MEMBERS. Churches—Mixed Messages
    18. 18. ‘IF YOU WANT TO PUNISH HER, WHAT YOU NEED TO DO IS IGNORE HER.” “I TELL THE MEN YOU CAN’T ABUSE WOMEN IN FRONT OF CHILDREN OR IN PUBLIC.’ “WHEN WOMEN OR COUPLES COME TO ME WITH A PROBLEM WITH VIOLENCE, I TELL THEM THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS YOU HAVE TO GIVE IT TIME. GIVE TIME A CHANCE. SOMETIMES, IF YOU DO NOT GIVE TIME A CHANCE, YOU END UP CONCLUDING AND PUSHING AND USE THE WRONG SOLUTION. AS A RESULT YOU END UP ENDANGERING THE CASE AND THE RELATIONSHIP FALLS APART. SO I SAY, ‘I’VE HEARD THE CASE. LET US PRAY OVER IT AND THEN COME BACK TOGETHER.’ COUNSELING IS A PSYCHOLOGICAL THING.”- Churches—Mixed Messages
    19. 19. Christianity in Action
    20. 20. Multi-faceted efforts to address underlying dynamics that drive gender based violence Mechanical Flower Snapshots
    21. 21. Education and Food Security Are Keys to Wellness for Women and Girls
    22. 22. Taking it to the halls of congress as voices of advocacy
    23. 23. FAITH IN ACTIVISM
    24. 24. Girls in Haiti Courtesy of Women Thrive Worldwide
    25. 25. JACQUI PATTERSON JPATTERSON@NAACPNET.ORG

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